Stefanos Tsitsipas believes he is "really close" to winning a grand slam after his ATP Finals success on Sunday.

The Greek, 21, became the youngest player to win the ATP Finals since 2001 after a thrilling 6-7 (6-8) 6-2 7-6 (7-4) victory over Dominic Thiem in London.

Tsitsipas, a semi-finalist at the Australian Open this year, feels a major success is not far away, with Wimbledon a goal.

"For sure Wimbledon is the tournament that has a lot of tradition. I think most of the players if you ask would want to win Wimbledon, but for me any grand slam would be great," he told a news conference.

"I feel like my game is getting better over time. I believe I'm really close on being crowned a grand slam champion. I know these are strong words that I say but I do feel like I belong to be there.

"I'm competing against some of the best players in the world and the amount of effort and the amount of work I put [in] every day deserves to have an outcome like this."

While Tsitsipas and Thiem reached the final in London, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic won two grand slams each in 2019.

The 'Big Three' of Nadal, Djokovic and Roger Federer have won 55 grand slams since 2003, including the past 12, and Tsitsipas is aware of the huge challenge awaiting the next generation.

"The thing that we have, the 'Big Three' dominating in the grand slams the last couple of years makes it really difficult for us because someone needs to get the job done to defeat them [in the] early rounds because once they get deep into a tournament they tend, as we saw, over the years to get better and play better, feel better," he said.

"For me, that's a really difficult task to do, for players to be able to beat them in these grand slams because it's a best-of-five format and this gives them more chances to stay in the match.

"It's not a best of three. If things were best of three it could have been much more different when it comes to grand slam champions over the years.

"So, that's an issue because they have been sharing how many grand slams? I don't know, 60 something?

"And for the young guys, it's all about time. I don't know. We'll either have to beat them or wait for them."

Stefanos Tsitsipas described himself as "living the dream" after knocking out Roger Federer to book an ATP Finals showpiece against Dominic Thiem.

Greek star Tsitsipas ousted Federer 6-3 6-4 in the semi-final of the season-ending event to reach the biggest final of his career.

Tsitsipas has had an up-and-down year which started with a run to the last four of the Australian Open and was followed by a mid-season slump, but he appears to be keeping his best until last.

The 21-year-old saved 11 of Federer's 12 break points on Saturday and explained beating the 20-time grand slam champion, who he watched winning major tournaments growing up, was difficult to comprehend.

"I grew up watching Roger here at the ATP Finals and Wimbledon and other finals," said Tsitsipas, who also beat Federer in the last 16 of the Australian Open.

"I wished one day I could face him and now I'm here living the dream.

"I remember myself being one of the kids here watching the event and I could never picture myself here. But it can happen.

"This victory is probably one of my best moments of the season. These are the moments I live for.

"This does feel, in a way, like a grand slam, because all eyes are here. Everyone knows this event. Everyone who watches tennis knows what the ATP Finals are.

"For me, it's a great new start, great new beginning to be here, playing in the Finals. It's really very difficult to be in that position I am in right now and it counts a lot."

Kyriakos Mitsotakis, the prime minister of Greece, was in attendance for the match and greeted Tsitsipas afterwards, highlighting the magnitude of his triumph.

"I'm really glad I played well, stayed calm," Tsitsipas said.

"It's a great moment not just for me, for everyone else, my country, my team. I'm proud of myself, how hard I fought, how concentrated I stayed in the break points. 

"I didn't crack under pressure. I was very composed and very mature in my decisions."

Tsitsipas and Thiem have met on six occasions over the last two years.

Thiem won four of those, including the most recent clash last month, which was a three-set battle in the China Open final.

Roger Federer conceded he had let chances slip through his fingers and made "pretty bad" mistakes as he crashed out of the ATP Finals with defeat to Stefanos Tsitsipas.

The Swiss star went down 6-3 6-4 in London, taking only one of his 12 break-point opportunities to lose the semi-final in straight sets just two days on from a near-faultless victory over Novak Djokovic.

It means he ends the year having not won any of the four grand slams or the season-ending event, with Sunday's final to be contested by Dominic Thiem and Tsitsipas.

Federer turns 39 in 2020 but, as he reflected on a year that saw him squander two championship points against Djokovic in the Wimbledon final, he is optimistic he will have plenty more opportunities to win top tournaments.

"No doubt I had my chances," Federer – who hit 26 unforced errors including two wayward smashes in his opening service game – said after his defeat, which leaves him without an ATP Finals title since 2011. 

"The break points were part of it. I had some good spells, but the spells where things were not working well, they were pretty bad.

"Getting broken and missing two smashes in one game – that hasn't happened in a long, long time or ever, so that was tough.

"At this level, you just can't have it happen, so that was pretty disappointing."

Of his 2020 hopes, Federer said: "I've got to keep on playing at the level like I have this year and then I will create some chances. 

"[I have] Got to take care of my body, listen to the signs, work well with the team and get the balance right with everything that's happening in my life."

Federer had produced a fine display to see off Djokovic in the round-robin stage but conceded he cannot afford to let his level drop when big matches and important moments arrive in quick succession.

He added: "When the matches come, it's not maybe as easy as it was maybe 10, 15 years ago, where you're just going to play very good day in, day out. 

"Maybe you need to do extra effort sometimes for that to happen. Maybe that's what it felt like, just things were complicated. 

"But I've got to maybe do even a better job at figuring these moments out, because the opportunities were there. They were there in other moments as well this season, maybe Indian Wells [in a final defeat to Thiem] or Wimbledon.

"That can change an entire season around, the confidence, the flow of things."

Federer retained an optimistic outlook going into another season on the ATP Tour, adding: "I'm happy [with] how I played this season. I thought I played some consistent, solid tennis and I'm extremely excited for next season."

Stefanos Tsitsipas described playing Roger Federer as the "biggest honour" after he overcame the 20-time grand slam champion in the ATP Finals.

Tsitsipas - debuting at the season-ending tournament - set up a final against either Dominic Thiem or defending champion Alexander Zverev with a 6-3 6-4 win on Saturday.

While Federer was wasteful, failing to take 11 out of 12 break points afforded to him by the Greek, Tsitsipas showed clinical composure to progress to his sixth final of 2019.

Saturday's triumph marks a second win over Federer for Tsitsipas, who also beat the world number three in the Australian Open, and the 21-year-old insisted there is no higher honour in men's tennis than going up against the Swiss.

"I am so proud of myself today, a great performance and once again the fans were great. I really enjoyed my time on the court," Tsitsipas said.

"Sometimes, matches like this you wonder how you overcome all these difficulties, those break points down. It's really like a mental struggle so I'm really proud that I managed to save so many break points today.

"Roger was playing good, shout out to him as well because he's played pretty well this week, an inspiration as always.

"Playing him is the biggest honour I can have, today's win is probably one of the best matches of this season and these are the moments I wait for and want to prove the best of my game."

"It's not easy to copy Roger. This guy does magic on the court so I'm trying to do half of what he does. He can be so good sometimes. We all have different styles.

"There is so much to learn from all these players. I grew up watching Roger as a kid, watching him here at the finals, Wimbledon, plenty of finals. I wished I could step out on the court one day and face him and today I'm here, living the dream.

"I remember being a kid here, watching the event, I could never picture myself standing here, but it happened, dreams do come true."

Tsitsipas has been in brilliant form at the O2 arena, and will now face Thiem or Zverev - who he beat in the round-robin stage - in Sunday's showdown.

"I have no preference [Thiem or Zverev]. Anything can happen in the final," he added.

"I played Zverev already in the group and last year he proved, when he lost to [Novak] Djokovic in the group and then went out in the final and beat him. Now I need to be super careful. Let's hope for a good semi-final, I'm going to watch it."

ATP Finals debutant Stefanos Tsitsipas booked his place in Sunday's final with a clinical 6-3 6-4 triumph over a wasteful Roger Federer at the O2 Arena.

Tsitsipas was beaten by world number one Rafael Nadal in a marathon match on Friday but showed little sign of weariness as he claimed his second win over six-time ATP Finals champion Federer.

The 21-year-old saved 12 break points in his Australia Open victory over Federer in January and the world number three failed to take 11 out of 12 this time around.

Tsitsipas made Federer pay, progressing into his sixth final of what has been a fantastic season, with Dominic Thiem or defending champion Alexander Zverev awaiting.

Having held serve in game one, Tsitsipas broke at the first time of asking with a well-worked point to take control of the set.

Tsitsipas saved three break points in game seven, though Federer subsequently held to love before winning a brilliant point at the culmination of a thrilling rally.

Three set points went begging for Tsitsipas as Federer teed up a sixth opportunity to break, only for a long backhand to hand his opponent a reprieve.

An incredible game rolled on, but at the seventh time of asking, Tsitsipas finally wrapped up a 47-minute first set.

Federer started set two with a crisp hold, yet the Swiss found himself a set and a break down when he sent a weak effort into the net as Tsitsipas broke to love.

But Federer responded brilliantly, taking a 40-love lead on Tsitsipas' serve, only to once again squander three more break points.

A sublime backhand and exquisite drop shot set up Federer's 10th break point, however, and this time he took advantage to draw level at 2-2.

Tsitsipas broke back immediately though and two overhit efforts put Federer two games down.

Another strong hold of serve put Tsitsipas on the brink, and - despite some nervy shots on his last service game - a thumping ace secured a deserved victory.

Rafael Nadal produced a magnificent comeback to keep his ATP Finals hopes alive with a three-set victory over Stefanos Tsitsipas at the O2 Arena.

Nadal went into Friday's contest knowing he had to win to have a chance of progressing to the last four of the season-ending showpiece.

His prospects of achieving that feat looked slim when the in-form Tsitsipas - who won his first two matches in straight sets - took the opener in a tie-break.

However, Nadal, who fought back from 5-1 down in the third set to see off Daniil Medvedev on Wednesday, again demonstrated his incredible powers of recovery in an absorbing encounter.

Devastating off both wings and supreme at the net, Nadal clinched a 6-7 (4-7) 6-4 7-5 triumph in two hours and 52 minutes.

For the Spaniard to join Tsitsipas in progressing from Group Andre Agassi, he will need Medvedev to beat Alexander Zverev. Should the Russian do him that favour, Nadal will face Roger Federer in the semi-finals.

Neither player faced a break point in a high-quality first set, but it was Nadal whose defences were breached in the tie-break.

The world number one went long after an accurate forehand down the line from Tsitsipas, who wisely challenged mid-point to bring up a pair of set points. 

Tsitsipas sent down five aces in the opener and he took his first set point in that fashion, Nadal having no answer for a serve down the T.

A sensational forehand return helped Nadal bring up the first break points of the match in the fifth game of the second, but Tsitsipas saved both and an emphatic forehand volley saw him hold.

With the help of a spectacular passing shot, Nadal went 30-0 up on Tsitsipas' next service game, only for the world number six to again fight his way out of trouble behind some hugely impressive serving.

However, the pressure finally told in the ninth game as, after a rasping overhead from Nadal, Tsitsipas skewed a simple forehand wide to surrender the first break of an engrossing contest.

Nadal's fists were pumping when Tsitsipas sent a return long to set up a deciding set and he maintained his intensity in a fascinating third.

A brutal cross-court backhand return gave Nadal his third break point of the set at 3-3 but an admirably dogged Tsitsipas held firm once more.

The reward finally came for the relentless Nadal as he produced an incredible stretching forehand that forced Tsitsipas into an awkward volley he could only send wide, and the reigning French Open and US Open champion made no mistake in holding to wrap up a superb victory.

Stefanos Tsitsipas made light work of defending ATP Finals champion Alexander Zverev to book his place in the last four in London with a 6-3 6-2 victory.

Zverev outdid world number one Rafael Nadal on Monday but could not match the speed, power and precision shown by Tsitsipas, who has made the semi-finals on his first appearance in the season-ending tournament.

A break on Zverev's final serve of the opener put the 21-year-old in control, with another concession of serve from the world number seven following at the start of set two.

With victory firmly in his sights, Tsitsipas did not let up as he charged on to serve out a dominant triumph in just 75 minutes.

"I was really surprised by my performance," Tsitsipas said. "I did everything right. I just played my game. I had a clear picture on the court."

After an even start, it was Tsitsipas who made the breakthrough.

Having played two excellent drop shots in succession to hold serve, the Greek broke with an exquisite return onto Zverev's toes to lead 5-3.

Tsitsipas took the 39-minute set at the first time of asking – Zverev sending a lob just beyond the baseline.

The German survived two break points at the start of set two, with a fine backhand pass at the culmination of a long rally forcing deuce.

But Tsitsipas could smell blood and, after squandering another chance to break, did so at the fourth time of asking with a combination of superb backhand efforts.

Tsitsipas failed to take another break point at 3-1 up, sending a makeable passing stroke out of play, but made no mistake at the next time of asking with a perfectly constructed attack.

Zverev challenged well to stay in the match, but it merely stalled the inevitable as Tsitsipas – who faces Nadal in his final group match – went on to secure a fourth straight win over his opponent with a sweetly struck ace.

Stefanos Tsitsipas has claimed his 7-6 (7-5) 6-4 win over Daniil Medvedev at the ATP Finals "means more than extra".

The pair have both enjoyed terrific campaigns in 2019 - while Medvedev has won four titles and made it to a further five finals, including in the US Open, 21-year-old Tsitsipas has cemented himself in the world's top 10.

However, it is no secret Tsitsipas and Medvedev do not see eye to eye, a rivalry which was established in March 2018 during their first meeting.

Medvedev came from behind to win, but was unhappy with his Greek opponent for a heated handshake, with the umpire forced to intervene.

Tsitsipas' triumph on Monday is his first in six attempts against Medvedev, who has won 29 of his last 34 matches and was in the hunt for a 60th tour-level win of 2019.

"It means more than extra," Tsitsipas told reporters after his win. "Our chemistry definitely isn't the best."

According to Tsitsipas, their rivalry began when Medvedev complained that the youngster did not hold his hand up to apologise for a rally winning shot hitting the net during their clash in Miami last year.

"He started telling me that what I do is unsportsmanlike. I tried not to pay attention, because I knew that it was something intentional, something that he wanted to pass to me," Tsitsipas added.

"Somehow it did affect me. I did get p***** and said what I said, which I do regret, but at the time I was very frustrated that things happened this way."

World number four Medvedev, meanwhile, acknowledged the better player won at the O2 Arena on Monday.

"He was better today, but I felt like I was missing some things." the Russian told reporters. 

"This frustrates me after. I do think it would frustrate me against any other opponent. Of course I wanted to make it an even bigger head-to-head, but it's the way it is."

Stefanos Tsitsipas produced a scintillating performance to beat rival Daniil Medvedev for the first time in a battle of two ATP Finals debutants at the O2 Arena.

Medvedev had won all five encounters with Tsitsipas before the Greek finally came out on top on Monday, winning 7-6 (7-5) 6-4.

Tsitsipas had a spring in his step from the start against an opponent whose game he has described as "boring" and did not face a solitary break point in the Group Andre Agassi opener.

Just the one break in the second set was enough for a fired-up Tsitsipas to seal a straight-sets victory over the fourth seed from Russia, who has been outstanding this year but faces a tough ask to reach the last four in London.

Tsitsipas started on the front foot and forced a break point in the second game, but Medvedev held to level at 1-1. 

That was the one break-point opportunity of the opening set, and it was Tsitsipas who then came out on top in a tight tie-break, punching a volley on the line for a third mini-break and letting out a roar as his opponent netted on the first set point.

There was no let-up with the high tempo in the second set as the two continued to trade blows from the baseline and demonstrate their prowess at the net.

Medvedev fended off two break points before holding for a 4-3 lead, but he gifted a relentless Tsitsipas a break point when he left a ball which landed in, and an errant backhand left him 5-4 down.

Powerful sixth seed Tsitsipas jumped for joy after serving out a match in which he won 89 per cent of points behind his first serve. 

Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer will meet in the group stage of the ATP Finals after being drawn together on Tuesday.

The pair have won 36 grand slams between them and triumphed at the season-ending tournament a collective 11 times, with Federer leading that head-to-head tally by one.

Joining the Swiss maestro and Djokovic in Bjorn Borg Group will be Dominic Thiem and Matteo Berrettini.

Andre Agassi Group consists of world number one Rafael Nadal, Daniil Medvedev, Stefanos Tsitsipas and reigning champion Alexander Zverev.

Nadal had been a doubt for the event after withdrawing ahead of the Paris Masters semi-final with an abdominal injury. 

The year-end number-one spot is up for grabs in London, with Nadal in the driving seat but Djokovic – the winner in Paris – ready to pounce.

Nadal has never won the ATP Finals, while Djokovic's last victory came in 2015 and Federer has endured an eight-year drought. 

Medvedev, Tsitsipas and Berrettini will each compete in the tournament for the first time, with the action scheduled to start on Sunday. 

Rafael Nadal battled past fan favourite Jo-Wilfried Tsonga to take his place in the semi-finals of the Paris Masters.

Tsonga had displayed fine form in Paris heading into Friday's encounter, but Nadal, who is still yet to win the ATP 1000 event, had too much quality after making the breakthrough in a hard-fought first set.

While Nadal laboured at times, Novak Djokovic, who will relinquish his number one status to the Spaniard next week, had no such issues as he confidently dispatched Stefanos Tsitsipas.

Meanwhile, Matteo Berrettini – who was sent out by Tsonga in the last 32 – clinched the last remaining ATP Finals spot thanks to Denis Shapovalov's straight sets victory over Gael Monfils.

NADAL DIGS DEEP

Nadal twice had to serve to stay in the first set, but having forced the tie-break, a wonderful backhand pass paved the way for him to forge ahead.

With the serve dominating throughout set one, it was Tsonga who blinked first in the second – Nadal taking full advantage of two sloppy shots to secure a first break of the match.

Soon-to-be world number one Nadal had finally hit his stride, playing a sublime through-the-legs shot to further drain Tsonga's confidence.

Despite showing resilience to hold, Tsonga was soon a double-break down, with Nadal wrapping up a 7-6 (7-4) 6-1 win when his opponent sent a desperate backhand return into the net.

 

DOMINANT DJOKOVIC HITS TOP GEAR

After struggling with illness in his opening matches, Djokovic was at his irresistible, untouchable best against Tsitsipas, who had no response to lose inside an hour.

A double break early in set one set the tone for Djokovic, who had the opener tied up in his favour inside 29 minutes.

Djokovic took just a minute longer to finish off set two, two more breaks ending any slim hopes of a Tsitsipas comeback before an overhit return from the Greek sealed his progression by an emphatic 6-1 6-2 scoreline.

 

BERRETTINI COMPLETES LONDON FIELD

With defending ATP Finals champion Alexander Zverev having claimed his spot at the O2 earlier in the week, there was one place up for grabs heading into Friday's play.

The permutations were simple, with Monfils – ranked 10th in the Race for London – needing a win to take the place of Berrettini.

However, the French number one came unstuck in some style against Shapovalov, who cruised to a 6-2 6-2 triumph, and Berrettini now completes the top eight, alongside Djokovic, Nadal, Roger Federer, Daniil Medvedev, Dominic Thiem, Tsitsipas and Zverev.

 

DIMITROV SWAPS HALLOWEEN TRICKS FOR SEMI-FINAL TREAT

Having already knocked out Thiem, Dimitrov claimed his spot in the last four with a 6-2 7-5 triumph over Cristian Garin, ending an 18-month wait to make a semi-final at ATP 1000 level.

The Bulgarian may have had to give up his Halloween celebrations, but it was a small price to pay.

"[A fantastic week] so far, I've skipped Halloween but it's a better place to be, here on centre court," Dimitrov told Tennis TV.

Halloween may have passed, yet the world number 27 now faces the scary prospect of going up against Djokovic for a place in the final.

Novak Djokovic made a statement of intent at the Paris Masters as he stormed into the semi-finals with a 6-1 6-2 demolition of Stefanos Tsitsipas.

Djokovic will lose his status as world number one to Rafael Nadal next week but put in a rampant performance to which Tsitsipas had little response.

Having succumbed to seventh-ranked Tsitsipas in Shanghai last month, Djokovic took his revenge in supremely confident fashion on Friday.

Djokovic had been under the weather heading into his previous match with Kyle Edmund, yet any doubts over his fitness were swiftly cast aside as a double break put him 4-0 up 18 minutes into the first set.

Tsitsipas clawed back three set points in his next service game, but it merely stalled the inevitable as Djokovic nosed ahead with his fifth chance.

With a sixth Paris semi-final firmly in his sights, four-time champion Djokovic did not let up – successive breaks putting the Serbian into a commanding position at 4-1.

Again, his Greek opponent managed to restore some pride when he held his next serve without conceding a point, but Djokovic had the match wrapped up when a delicate drop-shot forced Tsitsipas into an overhit return.

Gregor Dimitrov, who beat Cristian Garin earlier on Friday, awaits the top seed in the last four.

Novak Djokovic set up a tantalising clash with Stefanos Tsitsipas in the quarter-finals of the Paris Masters by seeing off Kyle Edmund.

The world number one, who will lose top spot to Rafael Nadal next week, appeared to be under the weather but ground out a 7-6 (9-7) 6-1 victory.

He growled through a post-match interview, his voice indicating all was not entirely well, but Djokovic still had enough in the tank to see off his British opponent.

Edmund ended a losing streak of eight matches when winning through the first two rounds in Paris, and the former top-20 player pushed Djokovic hard in the opening set.

Neither man registered a break, but the contest became one-sided once Djokovic nudged ahead. He clinched his 50th match win of the season in a hurry, claiming 12 of the final 14 points.

Now Tsitsipas awaits the 16-time grand slam champion, with the 21-year-old Greek having won two of his three previous matches against the all-time great.

The most recent of those meetings came in Shanghai just three weeks ago, when Tsitsipas prevailed in a deciding set.

Tsitsipas set up the fourth match in their rivalry by earning a 6-3 6-4 success against Australian Alex de Minaur.

Roger Federer produced another sterling display to defeat Stefanos Tsitsipas and move one win away from his 10th Swiss Indoors Basel title at a raucous St Jakobshalle.

Twenty-time grand slam champion Federer has been in brilliant, bruising form all week in his hometown, even if he reached the last four thanks to compatriot Stan Wawrinka's withdrawal due to a back injury.

There was no let up against his toughest opponent yet as Tsitsipas failed to withstand the Swiss storm, going down 6-4 6-4 to the stylish top seed and nine-time winner.

Tsitsipas, taken to three sets by Filip Krajinovic in the quarters while Federer rested, was immediately under intense pressure as a partisan crowd backed their man to go on the offensive.

The Greek escaped from the first five break points he faced but there was no halting Federer, who forced his opponent into a corner from where he could only find the net on the sixth opportunity.

Tsitsipas did well to prevent further damage but could not get back on serve, before Federer blasted into the lead in the first game of the second.

The 21-year-old forged his first break point in the final game of the match as the veteran favourite recovered from the brief hiccup to serve his way to a straightforward but impressive triumph.

Alex De Minaur awaits Federer in the final after battling past Reilly Opelka in three tie-breaks, winning 7-6 (7-2) 6-7 (4-7) 7-6 (7-3).

"In the second set, I did everything right - he just came up with two very big points," the Australian said. "I knew I just had to say, 'Too good,' and get ready for the third set."

De Minaur added of the Sunday decider: "I can't wait. It's my first time here and it's been a hell of an experience. I'm really looking forward to coming out tomorrow and having some fun."

Having never won an ATP Tour title prior to this season, De Minaur has triumphed in his three final appearances in 2019.

Stefanos Tsitsipas battled past Filip Krajinovic to set up a semi-final with favourite Roger Federer in the Swiss Indoors Basel.

Tsitsipas is already assured of his place in the ATP Finals in London and he will now be aiming to claim the scalp of former world number one Federer, who received a walkover due to Stan Wawrinka's withdrawal, ahead of next week's Paris Masters.

Krajinovic was no pushover for the Greek, however, with Tsitsipas initially falling behind before recovering to win 3-6 6-4 6-4.

Despite Tsitsipas cruising through the second set to restore parity, matters looked set to be complicated for the world number seven when he conceded a break early in the decider.

But Krajinovic was unable to capitalise – Tsitsipas holding his nerve and cracking his opponent's serve once more before wrapping up the win with the first match point on offer.

Meanwhile, Reilly Opelka ended a run of three successive defeats against top-10 opponents as he defeated Roberto Bautista Agut 6-3 3-6 6-3.

The 22-year-old American lost to world number 10 Agut at the Shanghai Masters, but inflicted revenge on Friday, inflicting a blow to the Spaniard's ATP Finals hopes.

With Matteo Berrettini having progressed to the last four in Vienna, Agut is now 130 points adrift of the Italian in the Race to London rankings.

Opelka will go up against Alex de Minaur – a Next Gen ATP Finals qualifier – in the semi-finals, after the Australian overcame Jan-Lennard Struff 6-4 7-6 (7-4) in Friday's other match.

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