Spain boss Luis Enrique will consider Valencia defender Gabriel Paulista for selection if he becomes available to the national team.

Brazilian-born centre-back Gabriel is in the process of gaining Spanish nationality and last year expressed an interest in representing Spain once he is eligible.

Speaking to Movistar+, Luis Enrique confirmed it was a situation he was monitoring.

"I am aware of every player who could be called up," he said.

"Paulista is going through a process that could make him eligible."

Should Gabriel make the cut for Euro 2020, it would evoke memories of Diego Costa making a switch to play for Spain as opposed to his native Brazil ahead of the 2014 World Cup.

Costa struggled as the defending champions were dumped out in the group stage and, although he eventually improved to 10 goals from 26 caps, the Atletico Madrid striker has not featured at international level since the penalty shoot-out defeat to hosts Russia at the 2018 World Cup.

Spain will face Sweden, Poland and a play-off qualifier in Group E at Euro 2020. 

Dani Olmo claims a formal offer has been received from Barcelona ahead of a prospective transfer from Dinamo Zagreb.

Catalan forward Olmo spent six years in the youth ranks at Barca's famed La Masia before making the surprise switch to Croatia in 2014.

The 21-year-old was named man of the match after he scored the winner in Spain Under-21s' European Championship final victory over Germany in 2019.

He brought that form into this season with a string of impressive displays during Dinamo's Champions League campaign, earning a first senior Spain cap in November – another occasion Olmo marked with a goal against Malta

Dinamo reportedly want €40million for Olmo, who hopes to arrive at Camp Nou in January rather than the end of the season if an agreement is reached.

"It makes me happy the rumours have become a formal proposal and Barca are planning my return," Olmo told L'Esportiu. "I spent six years at La Masia and they taught me values for a lifetime.

"I do not know if Barca wants me now or at the end of the season, it's something my representatives control.

"If there is an agreement between the clubs, it seems to me it is best to leave Zagreb now."

Olmo believes joining Barca in January would aid his development and boost his chances of securing a spot in Luis Enrique's Spain squad for Euro 2020.

"My goal is to go to the European Championship and it will be difficult for me in the next few months if I only play in a minor competition," he said.

"Not only for going to the European Championship, also for continuing to improve. I am prepared to take a step forward in my career."

Wolves winger Adama Traore would have no problem forgetting his ties to Barcelona if a move to Real Madrid presented itself, though a return to Camp Nou appeals more.

Traore, 23, spent most of his formative years in Barca's academy and had been considered one of La Masia's crown jewels for a long time.

The rapid forward even made his first-team debut in LaLiga as a 17-year-old in November 2013, playing seven minutes in a 4-0 win over Granada.

Barca allowed him to leave for Aston Villa in 2015, with Traore revealing the following year he had become frustrated with a lack of development at the Catalan club, as they kept him in the second team instead of helping him push on.

Concerns over his footballing mindset and end product became apparent at Villa and persisted after moves to Middlesbrough and Wolves, but this season he has taken on a key role at Molineux, even earning a Spain call-up.

As such, talk of a move to a bigger club has surfaced in recent times, and he would not close the door on a potential switch to Madrid, even though it is not a priority.

"If I do not have the option of Barca and I have to go to Real Madrid, I do not close any doors," he said on La Sexta show Jugones, before hinting at a previous issue with La Blaugrana.

"There was a misunderstanding with Barca. Something happened that I didn't like, but I prefer to keep it for myself."

And while Traore is open to returning to Spain, he has a goal to achieve in the Premier League first.

"Yes, why not [return to Spain]," he said. "But I made a promise to become one of the best in England."

Robert Moreno wants to put his departure as Spain boss and subsequent fallout with Luis Enrique behind him after being unveiled as the new head coach of Ligue 1 side Monaco.

The 42-year-old served as an assistant for La Roja until Luis Enrique stepped down in June to care for his young daughter Xana, who died in August following a battle with bone cancer.

Moreno took charge permanently at that point and oversaw Spain's qualification for Euro 2020, but Luis Enrique returned in November and did not appoint his former deputy to his staff due to an apparent disagreement.

The former Barcelona boss accused Moreno of being "disloyal" last month, claims the latter described as "ugly and unfair".

Speaking two days on from being appointed as Leonardo Jardim's successor at Monaco, Moreno - who previously worked with Luis Enrique at Roma, Celta Vigo and Barcelona - was keen to draw a line under the matter.

"I spent nine wonderful years at his side," he said at Monday's unveiling news conference. "I only have thanks. What happened a few weeks ago is already in the past.

"I have been a coach for 28 years. Since I was 14, I have been training and now the important thing is this presentation. The past is there, but you have to leave it behind."

Moreno has never previously managed a professional club but insists he is aware of what it requires to be successful.

"I have always been involved in the whole training process," he said. "I used to do all that before, so my processes will not change.

"I will give the talks, analyse the opposition, talk to my players. I am used to this.

"We all want to win and to achieve the best for the club. Our main objective here must be to improve every day. If we do that we will be able to reach our main aims."

Moreno's first game in charge is a Coupe de France clash with Reims on Saturday, before returning to Ligue 1 action with a trip to Paris Saint-Germain the following weekend.

Monaco have been tipped to bolster their squad ahead in the January transfer window, but the new coach was unwilling to discuss any specific targets.

"I will not make it public - that would be disrespectful to my players," he said. "Monaco have a large squad but we have to be attentive to the market to find good players.

"But I am not going to highlight particular positions [to strengthen] in public."

Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo have dominated the 2010s in terms of individual awards and moments of pure inspiration.

Future generations will look back on this past decade as a period obsessed with the two generational talents - their often-exaggerated rivalry exacerbated by spending such a long time on opposite sides of the Clasico divide.

But, while Ronaldo and Messi have filled more column inches than any other player on the planet, there are plenty of others who have been world leaders in their respective positions.

Having looked back over the last 10 years, using Opta data for inspiration, we have selected a Team of the Decade. But who makes the cut?

Is David de Gea selected in goal? Does Luis Suarez join Messi in attack? Has Virgil van Dijk done enough for inclusion? Find out below...

OMNISPORT TEAM OF THE DECADE

Manuel Neuer

There is not much more Manuel Neuer could have achieved over the past 10 years. For much of that time he has been one of the globe's most dependable goalkeepers, even if he has shown signs of decline since a spate of foot injuries. A veteran of seven Bundesliga title triumphs and a World Cup winner with Germany, Neuer boasts a save percentage of 74.2 per cent and has comfortably the most clean sheets (139) this decade in the German top flight.

Dani Alves

Has there ever been a better right-back than Dani Alves? The Brazilian stands to leave an impressive legacy, not just through his thrilling style of play, but with his record-breaking trophy haul of 43 after captaining Brazil to Copa America success this year. Despite being a right-back, he claimed 67 assists in league action through the 2010s, though his greatest contribution came in LaLiga with Barcelona, for whom he set up 51 goals. Marcelo (48) is the closest to him, but he has played 77 times more than the current Sao Paulo star.

Vincent Kompany

Although a brilliant player at his best, it is understandable to suggest Vincent Kompany never reached his ceiling due to injuries. Nevertheless, the Belgian will go down as a Premier League great such has been his impact with Manchester City, with whom he enjoyed four title wins. Kompany recorded 83 Premier League clean sheets in the 2010s, just 10 fewer than record-setter Kyle Walker, who has played 57 more matches. His leadership qualities have been missed by City this season.

Sergio Ramos

Sergio Ramos is a player who often polarises opinion, but he's one of only three players to have been at Madrid for the entire decade, so he must be doing something right. An undisputed leader and fierce competitor, Ramos is a big-game player like few others and boasts a goal-scoring record even many midfielders would be happy with, having netted 43 times in LaLiga since the start of 2010, more than any other defender. Over the past 10 years, he's helped Los Blancos to a remarkable four Champions League titles, while he won the 2010 World Cup and Euro 2012 with Spain.

Jordi Alba

At his best, Jordi Alba was almost unstoppable. The flying left-back became a staple and key outlet for one of the great Barcelona teams, with his driving runs – on or off the ball – often creating havoc. A master at making a darting run into the box before cutting a pass back to create a chance, Alba has 38 LaLiga assists to his name for Barca, a record bettered by only Dani Alves and Marcelo among defenders. He gets the nod ahead of his Madrid counterpart as his assist haul is from 72 fewer matches.

Luka Modric

The only player to break the Cristiano Ronaldo-Lionel Messi Ballon d'Or duopoly, Luka Modric has enjoyed a wonderful decade. A vital part of the Croatia team that enjoyed an historic run to the 2018 World Cup final, Modric also played a big role in Madrid's incredible Champions League domination. Toni Kroos (11,260) is the only midfielder to have completed more passes in LaLiga than Modric (10,759), while he laid on 42 assists and created 522 chances.

N'Golo Kante

If there was an award for the most likeable player of the decade, N'Golo Kante would surely be a frontrunner. Sadly there is no such thing, so he'll have to contend with inclusion in this team. Arguably the key cog in Leicester City's remarkable Premier League title win, Kante followed that up with similarly impressive form at Chelsea and with France, winning the World Cup with Les Bleus last year. He has made 912 tackles and interceptions in the Premier League, putting him fifth among players with 200 appearances or fewer this decade, and each of those who rank higher have played at least 20 matches more.

David Silva

When David Silva leaves Man City at the end of the season, there will inevitably be a debate as to whether he can be regarded the Premier League's greatest 'import'. That this will even be suggested tells you the impact he has had. No one gets close to Silva's record of 89 Premier League assists in the 2010s, with the Spaniard almost certainly the most consistent creator the division has seen in the past 10 years. He was similarly important for Spain until his post-World Cup retirement last year, having previously lifted the trophy in South Africa in 2010 and at Euro 2012, eventually accumulating 125 caps.

Lionel Messi

Where does one even begin with Lionel Messi? If any single player has defined the 2010s – from an individual perspective – in world football, it is surely the Barcelona talisman. In LaLiga, Messi has amassed 505 goal involvements (369 goals, 136 assist) in 343 matches since the start of the decade, routinely carrying Barca to victory. He has won every trophy possible with the Blaugrana over the past 10 years and claimed five Ballons d'Or, with his 2019 victory giving him a record-breaking sixth. Although now 32, he remains frighteningly decisive – all that eludes him is international success with Argentina.

Robert Lewandowski

A long list of immense strikers have starred throughout the 2010s, but arguably chief among them – Ronaldo aside – is Bayern Munich's Robert Lewandowski. Having moved from Borussia Dortmund, whom he helped turn into Champions League contenders, the Poland international has developed into a remarkable all-round striker. In 307 Bundesliga games he has 221 goals from 1,163 attempts, meaning he scores every 5.2 shots – by contrast, Ronaldo needs 6.4 efforts per goal. Although he is yet to win Europe's elite club competition, there is little doubt the Pole appears to be getting better with age having already notched 19 league goals this term, just three short of his total for 2018-19.

Cristiano Ronaldo

In the somewhat tiresome 'Ronaldo or Messi' debate about which superstar is "better", the former can at least point to his international successes with Portugal as something that sets him apart, having lifted Euro 2016 and the 2018-19 Nations League. That is just the tip of the iceberg for his brilliance in the 2010s, however. Across spells with Real Madrid and Juventus, Ronaldo has scored 335 league goals and laid on 95 assists. With Los Blancos he helped inspire four Champions League successes, also winning a couple of LaLiga titles. What a privilege it has been to see Ronaldo and Messi in the same era.

Monaco have sacked head coach Leonardo Jardim for the second time in just over a year and replaced him with former Spain boss Robert Moreno.

Jardim was reappointed by the Ligue 1 club in January, three months after first being dismissed, but results in 2019 have been mixed.

Pressure had recently been building on Jardim, who previously led Monaco to the French title and a Champions League semi-final in 2017, after last week's 3-0 home loss to Lille in the last 16 of the Coupe de la Ligue.

Monaco confirmed on their official website on Saturday that the 45-year-old has been dismissed with immediate effect and Moreno installed in his place on a deal that runs through until 2022.

Moreno has never previously managed a club at professional level, with his only previous top-level experience coming with the Spain senior side earlier this year.

He took temporary charge of La Roja in March when Luis Enrique – who he had worked as assistant to at Roma, Celta Vigo and Barcelona – stepped down for personal reasons.

Moreno was handed the job on a permanent basis in June after impressing in his caretaker role, but Luis Enrique returned five months later after qualification for Euro 2020 had been sealed.

The Spaniard will take charge of Monaco training next week ahead of the Coupe de France clash with Reims on January 4, with his first Ligue 1 game a rearranged meeting with champions Paris Saint-Germain the following weekend.

Mikel Arteta is the latest man to be charged with restoring success to a failing Arsenal, and Gunners fans will hope his previous working relationship with Pep Guardiola gives the Basque coach a head start.

Arsenal ditched another Basque tactician in Unai Emery last month and the process to appoint a replacement has been anything but swift.

Freddie Ljungberg took charge in an interim capacity but managed just a single win in five matches, highlighting the sorry state of the situation inherited by Arteta, whose appointment as head coach was confirmed on Friday.

It is former Arsenal captain Arteta's first job in management, having spent the three years since he retired from playing working as an assistant to Guardiola at Manchester City.

Guardiola has credited Arteta with improving him as a manager and believes the San Sebastian native is "absolutely ready" to strike out on his own after a "magnificent" time together at City.

Given his success in management, Guardiola has unsurprisingly been mentioned as a major inspiration for many coaches.

Here, we examine four others to have worked closely with Guardiola and enjoyed success.

Tito Vilanova

Guardiola and Vilanova came through Barcelona's youth academy together as youngsters, though the latter went on to spend much of his playing career in the lower divisions. They reunited as coaches in 2007, with Vilanova assuming the role of assistant with the Barcelona B side, before taking up a similar position when Guardiola was promoted to the senior team the following year.

They worked together until Guardiola departed in 2012, with Vilanova subsequently appointed his successor. He led Barca to LaLiga success despite requiring a leave of absence for cancer treatment, but he officially stepped down in July 2013 due to a relapse. Vilanova died in April 2014 due to complications from cancer.

Luis Enrique

Although Luis Enrique never worked specifically in tandem with Guardiola, he did succeed his friend and former team-mate when taking charge of Barca B in 2008. That meant Luis Enrique's team fed directly into Guardiola's senior side for three seasons.

"You could see from the start he was special," the City boss once said of the former attacking midfielder, who like Guardiola also won a treble in his debut season in charge of the Barcelona first team after spells at Roma and Celta Vigo. Luis Enrique has since gone on to become Spain coach.

Erik ten Hag

Ten Hag had already coached a senior team when he was put in charge of Bayern Munich's second string in June 2013, having led Go Ahead Eagles to a sixth-placed finish in the Eerste Divisie. Despite managing separate teams at the club, Ten Hag and first-team boss Guardiola worked closely. Guardiola said last season: "I was lucky to meet him at Bayern and he was an assistant from the second team. We had a lot of chats."

Ten Hag left Bayern the year before Guardiola and led Utrecht to fifth and fourth in the Eredivisie, earning him a shot at the big time with Ajax. Since his December 2017 appointment, the Dutchman has won a league title and taken Ajax to the Champions League semis last term. A return to Bayern – but this time with the senior side – appears likely.

Domenec Torrent

It is unlikely there is anyone in world football more familiar with Guardiola's work than Torrent. After first teaming up with Barcelona B, the pair worked side by side for 11 years until 2018. "When we started in La Tercera [fourth tier in Spain], I never thought I would be with him so much, but then we won every possible title," Torrent told El Diario earlier this year when he was in charge of New York City FC.

He presided over the MLS side as they won the Eastern Conference this year, before stepping down in November. Although keen to continue his management career, don't rule out a return to Guardiola's side. "If Pep calls me, I will go [to him]," Torrent said in May. "I am grateful and I know that I owe it all to him. If I had not been his assistant, I would not be here. I like being a head coach and I will only stop being one if Pep thinks I can be useful [to him]."

Ansu Fati has signed an improved contract with Barcelona until June 2022, the LaLiga champions have confirmed.

Under the fresh terms, the 17-year-old attacker's release clause is up from €100million to €170m and it will rise to €400m when he signs full-time professional terms.

Fati joined Barca's academy in 2012 and this season became the youngest LaLiga goalscorer in the club's history.

His second-half equaliser during August's 2-2 draw at Osasuna came with him aged 16 years and 304 days.

"For me, La Masia is the best school in the world," said Fati, who is both the youngest player to start a game at Camp Nou and also represent Barcelona in the Champions League.

"They helped me from the first day I arrived and I am extremely grateful to everyone who works there.

"They are all spectacular. From the first day, I have learned things from everyone. And they have also been there to support me through difficult times.

"Working every day with the best is a dream, and also a reward.

"From now onwards, what I have to do is keep working, even harder than ever, to keep getting chances and carry on enjoying myself. The rest will come after."

Fati, who is also eligible to play for Guinea-Bissau, was granted Spanish citizenship in September – clearing the way for him to represent them at Under-21 level for the first time the following month.

He has two goals in 11 appearances across all competitions in 2019-20, including four starts.

Luis Enrique was "looking on the bright side" after Spain were handed a good draw for the group stage at Euro 2020.

Spain will face Sweden, Poland and a play-off winner in Group E, with all their games to be played at San Mames in Bilbao.

The three-time European champions avoided the 'group of death' – featuring France, Germany and Portugal – and Luis Enrique was satisfied.

"It's about always looking on the bright side," the Spain coach told reporters.

"If we had to face France or Portugal, finishing first or second we would have avoided them until the end, which is not bad either way. Now future planning doesn't make much sense.

"I'm happy for the draw and to come back to represent the Spanish national team. Now let's wait for the months to pass to arrive at the competition."

With Spain playing at home, Luis Enrique said San Mames was among Europe's best stadiums.

"For me, without any doubt, San Mames is one of the most beautiful stadiums in Europe, along with Wembley. It's wonderful, beautiful," he said.

"The atmosphere that we are going to live there will be full of support and I hope not to disappoint, that we can do great in the group stages and win the three games."

Spain will begin their campaign against Sweden on June 15.

The last three European winners of major tournaments will play in the same pool at Euro 2020, after France, Portugal and Germany were all drawn together

Germany and France - victors at the respective 2014 and 2018 World Cups - will take on reigning European champions Portugal and a play-off winner in Group G.

Croatia, runners-up at last year's World Cup, will renew acquaintances with England, the side they beat in the semi-finals.

Here is the draw in full for next year's event, with four places in the finals still to be determined by the four path-winners in March's play-offs.

 

Group A: Turkey, Italy, Wales, Switzerland

Group B: Denmark, Finland, Belgium, Russia.

Group C: Netherlands, Ukraine, Austria, play-off winner from Path D (Georgia, Belarus, North Macedonia or Kosovo) or Romania if they win Path A.

Group D: England, Croatia, Czech Republic, play-off winner from Path C (Scotland, Israel, Norway or Serbia)

Group E: Spain, Sweden, Poland, play-off winner from Path B (Slovakia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Northern Ireland or Republic of Ireland)

Group F: Germany, France, Portugal, play-off winner from Path A (Iceland, Bulgaria, Hungary) or winner of Path D (Georgia, Belarus, North Macedonia or Kosovo) if Romania win Path A.

Holders Portugal will face world champions France and fellow heavyweights Germany in a daunting Group F at Euro 2020.

Saturday's draw in Bucharest pitted Fernando Santos' men and their talismanic captain Cristiano Ronaldo against the winners of the two World Cups either side of their Euro 2016 triumph.

It means Didier Deschamps' Bleus will have an opportunity for revenge after Portugal beat them on home soil at the Stade de France to lift the trophy.

The nation with the dubious pleasure of joining them is still to be determined. Iceland, Bulgaria or Hungary would claim the fourth spot if they progress through their play-off route in Path A.

However, if Romania are victorious in Path A, they will go into Group C with Netherlands, Ukraine and Austria.

In permutations that underline the convoluted and criticised format, one of Georgia, Belarus, North Macedonia or Kosovo from play-off Path B would enter Group F if Romania qualify. Otherwise, the winner of Path B goes into Group C.

Italy open the tournament, which will take place across 12 host cities, when they entertain Turkey in Rome on June 12. Wales and Switzerland are also in Group A.

England and Croatia renew acquaintances at Wembley in Group D – Gareth Southgate's men having been sunk by a Mario Mandzukic winner in the semi-finals of Russia 2018 before progressing to the Nations League Finals at the expense of Zlatko Dalic's team.

There is the possibility of an all-British encounter if Scotland prevail from their play-off path alongside Israel, Norway and Serbia, while Czech Republic will meet England again in the finals having traded victories with the Three Lions during qualification.

Group B is the second group not waiting to see how play-off cards fall, with the world's number-one ranked team Belgium lining up alongside Denmark, Finland and Russia.

Spain are aiming to make it three European titles in four attempts after securing glory in 2008 and 2012.

They head up Group C, where the winner of the play-off route including Bosnia-Herzegovina, Northern Ireland, Slovakia and the Republic of Ireland will round out the line-up alongside Sweden and Poland.

The Euro 2020 play-offs take place during next March's international break.

The last three European winners of major tournaments will play in the same pool at Euro 2020, after France, Portugal and Germany were all drawn together

Germany and France - victors at the respective 2014 and 2018 World Cups - will take on reigning European champions Portugal and a play-off winner in Group G.

Croatia, runners-up at last year's World Cup, will renew acquaintances with England, the side they beat in the semi-finals.

Here is the draw in full for next year's event, with four places in the finals still to be determined by the four path-winners in March's play-offs.

 

Group A: Turkey, Italy, Wales, Switzerland

Group B: Denmark, Finland, Belgium, Russia.

Group C: Netherlands, Ukraine, Austria, play-off winner from Path D (Georgia, Belarus, North Macedonia or Kosovo) or Romania if they win Path A.

Group D: England, Croatia, Czech Republic, play-off winner from Path C (Scotland, Israel, Norway or Serbia)

Group E: Spain, Sweden, Poland, play-off winner from Path B (Slovakia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Northern Ireland or Republic of Ireland)

Group F: Germany, France, Portugal, play-off winner from Path A (Iceland, Bulgaria, Hungary) or winner of Path D (Georgia, Belarus, North Macedonia or Kosovo) if Romania win Path A.

Robert Pires hopes France are paired with a reinvigorated and "motivated" England in the Euro 2020 group stage.

Both sides finished top of their qualifying groups to get their name in the hat for Saturday's draw in Bucharest.

England will host a total of seven matches in next year's finals and are in Pot 1, while France - despite being world champions - are in Pot 2.

Former Arsenal winger Pires would like to see his native France face off against Gareth Southgate's side, who he believes will be a big threat in the tournament.

"What's for sure is that we're going to draw a big team because unfortunately we're in Pot 2," he told Omnisport, speaking as part of the UEFA Champions League Trophy Tour driven by Nissan.

"Which one I would like to play against? France-England would be nice. 

"I think that we're strong but the English are having a renaissance and Southgate has built a good team, quite young, with a bit of experience and they can be a good surprise during the next Euros. 

"And as you know the final is in London so they will be motivated."

One team Pires is eager for France to avoid is Spain, who qualified for the competition with an unbeaten record that sets them out among the favourites.

"The team to avoid is always Spain," added Pires, who won the World Cup and European Championship during his playing days.

"They remain very strong, they're very skilled and they cause problems to us every time."

Former Spain coach Robert Moreno said Luis Enrique's "ugly" claims that he was "disloyal" and "ambitious" are unfair.

Moreno served as Luis Enrique's assistant for the national team until the latter stepped down in June to care for his young daughter, Xana, who died in August following a battle with bone cancer.

The former became coach at that point and oversaw Spain's qualification for Euro 2020 before he was informed Luis Enrique would be coming back as head coach.

Moreno was not appointed to Luis Enrique's staff a second time following an apparent fall out, as the former Barcelona boss questioned his former deputy's motives.

But the departed coach hit back as the feud continued on Thursday, suggesting he was always "faithful" to Luis Enrique.

Moreno also pointed out an alternative replacement when Luis Enrique initially departed would not have been so accommodating in granting him a return.

"I don't want to go into reproaches, but I have been personally attacked and labelled with something that I am not," he told a news conference. "In this puzzle, my pieces are missing.

"Nine years ago, I started working with Luis Enrique. We have always followed him, being faithful, until he reached the national team.

"Nobody knew for how long he would be out, but what we all did know was, if there was a possibility for him to return to the national team, our staff would have to stay.

"So, I stepped up and took charge of the team. If I had not done so, now Luis Enrique would not be coach of the national team. It would be another coach."

Moreno said he was left "in a state of shock for a week" after learning Luis Enrique did not intend to make him assistant again.

He added: "To this date, I honestly don't know why Luis Enrique doesn't want me to be with him. I don't know as he was not clear in his news conference.

"He labelled me with two adjectives ["disloyal" and "ambitious"] that are very ugly and that I don't deserve. I have proved over the whole time I worked with him that I am not like that.

"The years will pass and I will still not know. He could not explain it - or I could not understand it according to what my people have told me, as I did not watch the news conference myself."

Preferring to look forward, Moreno reiterated his desire to continue a career as a head coach despite a testing first high-profile experience.

"I have just started," he said. "I am really excited to be back on the pitch, to handle training sessions, to manage a team, to make decisions, to attend news conferences. I'm really looking forward to it.

"It has always been my passion to become a head coach. I am someone who started from the very bottom but was able to reach the top level."

Luis Enrique accused his ex-assistant Robert Moreno of being "disloyal" as the fallout from Spain's shock coaching change continued on Wednesday.

The former Barcelona boss faced the media for the first time since returning to the role on November 19 and took aim at Moreno's character.

Moreno served as Luis Enrique's assistant until the latter stepped down from the top job in June to care for his young daughter, Xana, who died in August following a battle with bone cancer.

Spain qualified for Euro 2020 under Moreno but he will not be part of Luis Enrique's backroom team moving forward after a falling out between the pair.

"The only person responsible for Robert Moreno not being on my staff is me," Luis Enrique said.

"On September 12, I met him at my house and he told me that he wanted to coach at the European Championship and then, if I wanted, he would be my assistant.

"I understand that he is ambitious, that it is his dream to be a coach, but for me it is disloyal, I would not do it. For me it is a big flaw. I understand his position but I do not share it.

"I told him I no longer see him as my assistant and that I don't know when I will be back, but that I feel like working. He finished the meeting in a cordial way and I called the people on my staff to let them know my opinion and that of the other side, so that no one misrepresents my words.

"From there, I must say that I never approached the federation. I never called them. 

"Professionally I have no reason to criticise Robert Moreno. He is very prepared and is a very good coach. His words said one thing and the facts were very different.

"I am not the good one in the movie, but neither am I the bad one."

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