David de Gea is one of the best goalkeepers in the world having saved Manchester United many times in his career, according to team-mate Nemanja Matic.

After a shaky start to life at Old Trafford following his arrival from Atletico Madrid, Spaniard De Gea became a pivotal part of a United team in transition, winning player of the year for three successive seasons.

However a slip in his previously lofty standards has led to greater scrutiny on his performances, with former Red Devils skipper Roy Keane even declaring he was "sick to death" of the keeper following Tottenham's goal in the 1-1 draw back in June.

Commenting on Steven Bergwijn's opener on Sky Sports' live coverage of the Premier League fixture, Keane said: "I would be fighting him at half-time. I would be swinging punches at that guy."

However, speaking to Stats Perform News, Matic explained that while he understands the role of those working in the media, De Gea remains in the top tier at his position.

"I didn't see what he [Keane] said but I think we have to agree David is one of the best goalkeepers in the world," the United midfielder said  

"He has saved us many times, saved points. Everyone is allowed to have mistakes - we are human.  

"The pundits, their job is to say their opinions. They have to speak because one team loses. No problem - we respect them, and we will always try to improve."

De Gea kept three clean sheets in four league outings after the draw with Spurs, though he was beaten twice as United drew with Southampton on Monday in his 400th appearance for the club.

The result saw Ole Gunnar Solskjaer's side miss the chance to climb into third place in the table above Chelsea, who duly won 24 hours later against Norwich City to increase the gap to four points.

Frank Lampard has the Blues on course to qualify for the Champions League and while in direct competition for a top-four finish with his old club, Matic is impressed at the job done by his former team-mate at Stamford Bridge.

"I am happy for [Frank Lampard], I have to say that he is doing good. Of course we are fighting with them for that Champions League spot, but I have to be honest and say that I am happy he is doing great, because he is a great, great guy," Matic said. 

"I played with him when I signed for Chelsea in 2009, he was one of the best midfielders in the world, so when I trained with him he was a big example for me as a professional and I am happy for him after being a player, he's continued to do a great job as a manager.

"I wish him all the best, but of course this season I wish to be ahead of him in the Champions League spots."

David de Gea's struggles at Manchester United have gone beyond the point where they can be considered a blip, according to the club's former captain Gary Neville.

The Spain international made a costly mistake against Tottenham on Friday as he failed to keep out a shot from Steven Bergwijn.

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer's side went on to salvage a 1-1 away draw thanks to Bruno Fernandes' late penalty.

But De Gea's error prompted an astonishing rant from another ex-United skipper, Roy Keane, who branded him "overrated" and said he would have been tempted to punch the Spaniard in the dressing room.

Neville has similar concerns and feels United can no longer rely on the 29-year-old, whose problems date back to the World Cup.

"De Gea was the one player United could rely upon for the last four years but he is not the same," he said on the Gary Neville Podcast.

"He hasn't been the same for some time. When form drops for six months it's a blip but when it goes on for a year you start to worry. When it goes over two years it becomes more permanent.

"That is now a fair representation of what De Gea is as he's making lots of mistakes. Ones he would never make – he was always somebody you could completely rely upon. 

"The reception he's got in Spain has affected him. He's even been booed by Spanish fans when he's wearing the Spanish shirt. 

"In the World Cup in 2018 he really struggled and from that he's doubted himself."

Neville believes the problems for De Gea – who joined United in 2011 – are in the mind, urging him to get back to basics and work harder than he has done at any other point of his career.

"It can only be a confidence thing," said Neville. "Mentally he's not quite the same. The arms, legs and body are the same – it's got to be the mind.

"He's got to go back to basics. There's only one thing you can do when you're having a tough time: work, work harder than you have ever done in your life. 

"What will happen is that you will tell yourself the amount of work you put in you deserve to be good again. That means coming in at 7.30am and leaving at 6pm if needs be.

"He has to do something to stop the erosion. Mistakes like that can happen on the first game back but it's happening far too much over the past couple of years."

Roy Keane said he was "sick to death" of David de Gea and "staggered" by Harry Maguire after their part in Steven Bergwijn's first-half goal for Tottenham against Manchester United.

The Red Devils went 1-0 down in north London in their first Premier League match since the coronavirus pandemic forced the competition to be suspended in March.

A simple long ball headed away by Luke Shaw came to Bergwijn, who ran straight past Maguire before firing a shot at De Gea that the United keeper failed to parry away.

Former captain Keane was left furious with the manner of the goal and claimed he would not have allowed them to travel home with the team if he were still playing.

"I'm shocked at that goal," he said at half-time on Sky Sports. "To give away that goal… I'm fuming here watching Manchester United.

"I can't believe Shaw, heading the ball up in the air and then running forward. I'm staggered at Maguire, staggered that an international player can just get done like that.

"And I'm sick to death of this goalkeeper. I would be fighting him at half-time. I would be swinging punches at that guy.

"This is a standard save for an established international goalkeeper. I am flabbergasted.

"Maguire and De Gea – I wouldn't even let them on the bus after the match. Get a taxi back to Manchester. They are established international players. We can analyse this until the cows come home. You just do your job.

"We are trying to get in the top four here, not win leagues. God forbid about winning trophies. I'm disgusted with it. Maguire, De Gea, you should hang your heads in shame."

Keane added of De Gea, who made a fine one-handed save to stop Son Heung-min making it 2-0: "He is the most overrated goalkeeper I have seen in a long time."

Alex Ferguson was joined by coaching staff at Manchester United's training base, The Cliff, as normal at 9am on Friday May 28, 1999.

It was like any other pre-season planning meeting, as the men looked ahead to the 1999-2000 campaign over bacon sandwiches and cups of tea.

But, really, it wasn't like any of the planning sessions to have come before for Ferguson and his staff.

Less than 24 hours earlier they had all been on an open-top bus parade around Manchester, showing off an unprecedented treble of the Premier League, FA Cup and Champions League to an estimated 700,000 supporters.

The crowning achievement of that treble came the night before the parade, on May 26, 1999 in Barcelona – it was Ferguson's masterpiece, the iconic victory of his association with United.

The Road to Barcelona

United's route to the 1999 Champions League final was by no means straightforward – they were grouped with eventual runners-up Bayern Munich, Barcelona and Brondby, with the Catalans ultimately the one of the three giants to fall before the knockout phase.

A 3-1 aggregate win over Inter followed in the quarter-finals, helped massively by Dwight Yorke's brace in the 2-0 home-leg triumph, before a chaotic showdown with Juventus in the semis.

Ryan Giggs salvaged United a 1-1 draw with an emphatic late strike at Old Trafford in their first meeting, but United appeared to be crashing out in comprehensive fashion when Filippo Inzaghi netted a brace inside the first 11 minutes in Turin – his second taking a wicked deflection off Jaap Stam and looping over Peter Schmeichel.

But a satisfying glancing header from Roy Keane put United back in it, before Yorke's diving header levelled it on the night and gave them the away-goals advantage.

Andy Cole rounded things off late on, tucking in from an acute angle after Yorke had been felled by Angelo Peruzzi. United were in the final for the first time in 31 years.

'That night in Barcelona'

Ferguson stood on the Camp Nou touchline in the build-up to kick-off. He turned back towards the crowd and just stared as a mass of photographers swarmed in front of him.

He was a picture of calm, pure zen, as he gazed into the seemingly endless maw of seats in Barcelona's gigantic stadium. What was going through his mind? Who knows, but the idea of what would unravel before his eyes was surely not in his wildest dreams.

"My lack of vanity precludes me from being gutted about it," Ferguson had said in his pre-match news conference, as he was reminded of the fact rivals and detractors used his previous lack of Champions League success as a stick to beat him with. "I think what I've achieved stands for itself, and I'm lucky to be able to do that. What I've won as a manager – I'm blessed, so why should I look upon failure to win a European Cup as a tragedy for me?"

Anyone suggesting United were already at a disadvantage at kick-off might've had a point, as they were without the suspended Keane and Paul Scholes, and within six minutes Mario Basler's free-kick found its way into the bottom-right corner.

The many chances continued to come and go for a dominant Bayern, who had Samuel Kuffour marshalling Cole expertly. United were fortunate to be only 1-0 down at the break.

"[Ferguson] then said to us, 'This is the European Cup final - some of you may never get here again - make sure when you come in at full-time knowing that you have given your all and left nothing on the pitch'," Cole recalled of his manager's half-time team talk years later.

The Bayern onslaught continued. Mehmet Scholl's delicate chip hit the post and fell into Schmeichel's arms, before a Carsten Jancker overhead kick came back off the crossbar.

"When the chip hit the post, I didn't turn around at first because I knew that was 2-0 – when I saw it hit the post and come straight back to me, I knew we'd win," Schmeichel told UEFA in 2018.

And United duly rallied.

'Football. Bloody hell.'

Teddy Sheringham had been introduced from the bench for Jesper Blomqvist, leaving United with a single central midfielder – Nicky Butt – as David Beckham moved back towards the right and Giggs to the left.

Lothar Matthaus' withdrawal 10 minutes from time, he felt, emboldened United. Soon after, Ole Gunnar Solskjaer replaced Cole, leaving Ferguson's men with three up top – they were not about to give up without a final push.

"On the bench, we all thought we'd won. There was nothing to suggest United would score. What followed was unbelievable – it was like watching a horror film," Matthaus reflected.

As United enjoyed a late flurry, a Denis Irwin cross in the 90th minute was deflected behind. The corner could only be cleared as far as Giggs on the edge of the box, and his scuffed shot was turned in by Sheringham in similarly scruffy fashion, sparking scenes of disbelief on both benches – Oliver Kahn's half-hearted offside appeal falling on deaf ears.

Another attack up the left, this time led by Solskjaer, brought a second corner in the third minute of stoppage time.

Another tantalising Beckham delivery was this time met cleanly by a United head, Sheringham glancing it on, and before anyone could work out whether it was heading wide or not, the now iconic sentence was uttered on British commentary: "And Solskjaer has won it!"

With Kuffour getting drawn towards the centre of the box, Solskjaer was left in space and he stuck out his right foot to divert Sheringham's flick-on into the roof of the net.

Even in a match as unpredictable as this, United knew there was no way back for the German champions after two goals in 103 seconds. "All the Bayern players were on the floor - they didn't even want to kick off again. We knew we'd won it," Ferguson's assistant at the time, Steve McLaren, once said to the Daily Mail.

Bayern players, officials and sympathisers weren't shy in their lambasting of United and their luck afterwards – though Ferguson's succinct appraisal of the situation summed it up a little better in a post-match interview with ITV: "Football, bloody hell."

Ferguson's career with United was a truly remarkable success – the longevity, the trophies, the 'Fergie time'.

They all sum up this incredible era for United, and that night in Barcelona will be remembered as Ferguson's magnum opus.

But the defining moment? That came 36 hours later, as Ferguson's unrivalled work ethic had him already planning his next successes when anyone else would have surely been nursing the mother of all hangovers.

Manchester United should sell Paul Pogba and bring in a player with "the right mentality and desire", according to former striker Teddy Sheringham.

France star Pogba has been restricted to just seven Premier League appearances this season due to injuries to his foot and ankle.

The 2018 World Cup winner has been training at Carrington again and is expected to be fit to play a part if the 2019-20 campaign resumes as planned following its suspension amid the coronavirus crisis.

Pogba's future beyond this term is far from certain, though, with Real Madrid and Juventus persistently linked with a move for the 27-year-old.

Sheringham, a key part of United's treble-winning side of 1998-99, thinks the Red Devils should cash in on their record signing and bring in a player more like former captain Roy Keane.

"People mention top players and captains," Sheringham told Sky Sports. "When things weren't going right in our time, Roy Keane put things right. He would drive our team on, he would dig deep and make sure we had a say in every game we played in because of his desire.

"When you look at Pogba, yes, he may be a talented boy, but does he have the same mentality? Does he really dig deep and get Manchester United out of the mire when the going gets tough? For me the answer is no.

"He gives off the wrong vibe as a Manchester United player. Yes, it's good to be cocky and arrogant at the right times, Dwight Yorke had that as well, a big smile on his face when he played. But Yorke had a desire to do the right things at the right times. You've got to have that, and I don't think Paul Pogba gives you that.

"He would be one that would need to go so that you can get someone in with the right mentality and desire to drive Manchester United out of the position they are in."

Roy Keane sees cause for optimism in Manchester United's progress over recent months but still believes they have "a long way back" before challenging Liverpool or Manchester City.

United have endured an inconsistent season under Keane's former team-mate Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, yet the 20-time English champions headed into the coronavirus-enforced break in form.

The Old Trafford outfit are unbeaten in 11 and up to fifth in the Premier League, inspired by the January arrival of midfielder Bruno Fernandes.

Ex-captain Keane is looking for United to have a strong finish to the season, but he recognises there remains a sizeable gap to rivals Liverpool and City, the runaway league leaders and defending champions respectively.

"I think there's certainly a feel-good factor back at United over the past number of games," Keane told Sky Sports.

"Also, in the back of your mind, you're thinking if [Paul] Pogba can get back, people like [Marcus] Rashford can get fit towards the end of the season, that would be a big boost for them.

"So there's definitely a feel-good factor, but there's still a long way back for United yet. I still think they're a long way behind City and, obviously, Liverpool.

"The signs are a lot better than six months ago, 12 months ago. The signings have all settled in very, very well and will only get better with time.

"If they can have a good finish to the season - if we get back to playing games - and if they can get one or two very good players again in the summer, then that's another big step.

"I always think in terms of their recovery, there's still a bit to go yet."

United have been linked with Jadon Sancho ahead of the coming transfer window, yet Keane believes their shortcomings are in defence.

"Whenever we talk about the big clubs, everyone always talks about attacking players," he said. "I still think they need one or two defenders.

"I'm still not convinced with the centre-halves, I'm certainly not convinced with [left-back Luke] Shaw. I think [Brandon] Williams has done well as a young kid, even though he's right-footed playing on that side."

Roy Keane has sympathy for the stars at elite football clubs being asked to take pay cuts amid the coronavirus pandemic.

With seasons suspended during the global crisis, pressure has been growing on players to forgo a portion of their wages.

Leading European sides including Barcelona have agreed cuts - Lionel Messi and co accepting a 70 per cent reduction - but Premier League discussions have been tricky.

England's top flight proposed a league-wide 30 per cent cut in early April, yet clubs have since held separate discussions with their squads.

While Arsenal secured a 12.5 per cent drop in wages, it was later reported Mesut Ozil was among three players to refuse the pay cut, prompting further criticism.

However, Premier League stars, led by Jordan Henderson, have launched their own #PlayersTogether initiative to support health services.

And former Manchester United captain Keane would prefer such calls on donations and cuts at cash-rich clubs to be left to the players.

"I'm not sure how I would have dealt with it, but I do have a lot of sympathy for the players," Keane told Sky Sports. "Once again, a lot of the players are getting criticised.

"The way I would look at it now - and I'm probably talking about players at the really big clubs, who have a lot of wealthy owners, with a lot of pressure to take pay cuts - I wouldn't take a pay cut from anybody if I was at one of the bigger clubs.

"I know there's pressure on players, but it's nobody's business what you do with your wages. You take your wages, and if you want to be generous, go ahead and do it.

"There's a lot of speculation out there - I don't think anybody should be believing what they're reading about what players are doing, whether they're taking 10 per cent, 15 per cent.

"Eventually there've been a few statements from clubs probably near the bottom of the Premier League over the past week or so. They've obviously taken 10 or 15 per cent.

"But I don't think any players should feel under pressure from clubs - particularly bigger clubs - to take pay cuts.

"They've signed a contract. I know everyone's different, different personal details, but your contract with the club is a personal matter.

"This idea that all the players should take a pay cut, that all the players have to do this, I think that's nonsense. I think it's up to the individual.

"If they want to stick to their guns and say, 'Listen, I'm sticking to my full wages while we've got a billionaire in the background', then do it.

"Don't be swayed by some sort of pressure by the media, who will constantly write lies anyway about certain players. All it is speculation.

"I'm really surprised by the amount of people I suppose jumping on the bandwagon with their criticism of the players. It's nobody's business.

"I'm talking about the top clubs here, with the really wealthy owners. Obviously I've got a lot of sympathy for the clubs in the lower leagues. You obviously make sacrifices, of course.

"But the players at the top, where the clubs have the money, stick to your guns."

Frank Lampard joked he was stunned by Roy Keane's praise for Billy Gilmour and believes his fledgling Chelsea midfielder has traits similar to another Manchester United legend in Paul Scholes.

Scottish teenager Gilmour was thrust into action in an FA Cup victory over Liverpool in March and followed up a Man-of-the-Match display in that game with a fine showing in a 4-0 hammering of Everton.

The suspension of the Premier League due to the coronavirus pandemic stemmed the 18-year-old's promising momentum but his performance against Liverpool looked "world class" according to Keane, a man notoriously difficult to impress in his role as a pundit.

Blues boss Lampard was surprised to hear such effusive praise from Keane but believes Gilmour was deserving of such comments. 

Speaking to Sky Sports, he said: "I had to put my cup of tea down to hear Roy say something nice! 

"I'm only joking – Roy was a fantastic midfield player and he probably won't give credit unless it's due. It certainly was due. 

"I heard the statements he made about Billy and he was spot on, and Billy should be happy with that. If he goes and follows the ideas of midfield play that someone like Roy Keane says, he won't go far wrong."

Keane was part of a legendary midfield at the Red Devils alongside Scholes. Lampard was keen to temper expectations but did concede Gilmour possesses similarites with the latter. 

"There aren't many days when you don't see him show up and try to do the right things," Lampard added. 

"Paul Scholes was obviously one of the greatest midfield players I've ever played against in the Premier League. 

"It was interesting to play against Scholesy: in the early parts of the career when he was a goal-getter, he'd play it around the corner and then would arrive in the box and have the ability and the feet and the nous to score the goals or make assists regularly, and then to see him change his career [was impressive].

"The cut-throat part of the pitch is probably at the top end, where it becomes much tighter and quicker. 

"In midfield, it can be easier because you have more time in those deeper areas. But if you're a player that's not top quality like Scholesy, more time can sometimes be a problem for you. 

"He would always pick the right pass, he had incredible range, and if you did try to jump from midfield to get close to him, he'd just play it round the corner because he'd know you were coming.

"Billy has shown early signs of that sort of ability. I'm not comparing him to Scholesy – no way – but in terms of those basics, Billy certainly has them and that's a great platform to build hopefully a fantastic career."

Roy Keane believes the brilliance and unselfishness of striking quartet Andy Cole, Teddy Sheringham, Ole Gunnar Solskjaer and Dwight Yorke made Manchester United "really lucky" to have them.

Reflecting on United's treble success in 1999 and the three consecutive Premier League titles secured up to 2001, Keane and former team-mate Gary Neville hailed the club's strikeforce.

Current manager Solskjaer and Sheringham, who both scored in the Champions League final win over Bayern Munich, were integral rotation pieces who complemented the famed Yorke and Cole partnership.

Keane felt the personalities of that group were crucial in making it work at a time when, despite their quality, none of the four players were starting every week.

"We were really lucky with the four strikers we had at that time, Yorkie, Coley, Ole and Teddy - brilliant players," Keane said to Sky Sports.

"I always try make the point to remind people they were very good lads in the dressing room. People talk about strikers being selfish, they have to be, but I found all of these lads to be decent lads.

"They looked at the bigger picture, they had to bide their time as the manager rotated the squad.

"We were one of the first to rotate the squad throughout the competitions. The players made it work, they were professionals and when they got the opportunity they went out and did the business."

Asked who the best combination was, Keane added: "I don't like these conversations, I really don't, it's really unfair."

Neville, meanwhile, felt the partnership between Yorke and Cole could not have been replicated by other world-class strikers.

He said: "The thing about that partnership is that neither minded who scored.

"That is something you wouldn't have seen with partnerships involving Ruud van Nistelrooy and Michael Owen, who had to score to be happy.

"Yorke and Cole didn't hit it off from the start, it took 10 to 15 games from memory.

"Leicester away sticks in my mind, something just happened that day and after that they started socialising together, getting on off the pitch and a respect between each other developed.

"We knew Yorke was a good player from Aston Villa, but I don't think anybody realised how good a player he was, he surprised us when he came into the team."

Gary Neville and Roy Keane have called for Manchester United to stop doing business with Mino Raiola and let Paul Pogba leave the club following the agent's latest comments.

United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer said ahead of the Premier League clash with Chelsea the midfielder was "our player and not Mino's".

Those comments prompted a response from Raiola shortly before United's 2-0 win at Stamford Bridge.

With the Red Devils struggling in the race for Champions League qualification prior to a precious victory, the agent said Solskjaer "has other things to worry about".

In their roles as pundits for Sky Sports, former United favourites Neville and Keane were each asked about Raiola and the situation with Pogba, who has been sidelined by an ankle injury since December amid repeated talk of a move away from Old Trafford.

They each expect Pogba to depart, with Neville saying: "It will end with Paul Pogba leaving Manchester United.

"What needs to happen is that club taking a stance on that agent. That agent has messed them around now for years with Pogba and other players.

"Why they allow themselves to be played by him I'll never know. He's a serious thorn in the side for them. Manchester United should just stand strong and say, 'If you're represented by him, we won't deal with you'."

Keane added: "If it's not right for the club and people are almost laughing at you, these agents, let these lads go.

"Look at the bigger picture. We're talking about a great club like Manchester United. Don't go chasing after these agents and these players who, I think, the bottom line, don't really want to be at the club.

"The agents don't want them to be there, I don't think Pogba wants to be there. Just shake hands and say, 'Off you go'.

"He'll go this summer. He'll go in the summer, 100 per cent."

Roy Keane believes Anthony Martial's costly miss against Liverpool showed he is "not quite good enough" to play for Manchester United.

Martial, signed from Monaco in a reported £36million deal in 2015, has 11 goals in all competitions this season.

But he passed up a golden chance for United to equalise at Anfield in their 2-0 defeat to Premier League leaders Liverpool on Sunday.

Trailing to Virgil van Dijk's early header, Martial controlled on his chest on the left-hand side of the penalty area in the second half but blazed over the crossbar with just Alisson to beat.

Mohamed Salah wrapped up a Liverpool victory in stoppage time and former United captain Keane, speaking in his role as a Sky Sports pundit, bemoaned Martial's inability to hit the target.

"Martial has come to Man Utd, and the big strikers score in the big moments," Keane said. "But that miss sums up his career at Man Utd in a nutshell.

"You hit the target. Excellent build-up play, but you have to hit the target. No excuses.

"The big strikers who are remembered by those supporters hit the target and the back of the net.

"That's why that guy is not quite good enough for Man Utd. That moment summed him up."

United are set to be without Martial's strike partner Marcus Rashford - who missed the Liverpool game - for more than six weeks with a double stress fracture in his back.

Tottenham boss Mauricio Pochettino is in agreement with Roy Keane that striker Harry Kane could boost any rival club.

Speaking after Manchester United's 1-1 draw with Liverpool last weekend, Keane urged his former side to sign Kane next year to resolve their goalscoring issues.

The England international has scored 127 Premier League goals since the start of 2014-15, twice finishing as the division's top scorer.

Keane suggested bringing in the prolific Tottenham forward would be a simple solution for United, who have failed to score more than once in a game since the opening weekend of the season.

Pochettino has heaped further praise on Kane in response to Keane's comments, saying at Friday's news conference: "I heard what was said. 

"Of course, I respect him and admired him when he was a player. He was the kind of player who you want beside you, or as a centre-back like me you want him in front of you. 

"Whenever I listen to him he is very clinical in his comments. Of course he loves good players and Harry Kane is a fantastic player. We more than agree Harry Kane deserves everything."

Tottenham return to Premier League action on Sunday with a trip to Liverpool, while Manchester United travel to Norwich City the same day

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has hailed Manchester United's striking options following Roy Keane's suggestion the club should sign Harry Kane, while former team-mate Edwin van der Sar has distanced himself from the vacant director of football role.

Following United's 1-1 draw with Liverpool on Sunday, ex-captain Keane – working as a pundit for Sky Sports – stated United should purchase England forward Kane from Tottenham to solve their issues up front.

Marcus Rashford scored in the stalemate at Old Trafford, taking his tally of league goals for the season to four, but Solskjaer's options up front have been diminished by Romelu Lukaku and Alexis Sanchez leaving for Inter, while Anthony Martial is only just returning from injury.

Solskjaer insists he is satisfied with his current pool of strikers, although acknowledged having a player of Kane's quality would always be a bonus.

"Roy's quite straightforward, isn't he," Solskjaer told a news conference when asked about his former team-mate's comments ahead of United's Europa League meeting with Partizan Belgrade.

"For us it's [about] working hard. Getting Anthony back is going to be a massive boost for us and I'm sure, when he comes back, that'll help Marcus as well. 

"With the forwards we've got and the pace, I'm looking forward to the next few weeks.

"There aren't many [Robert] Lewandowskis and Harry Kanes - they're like [Alan] Shearer, [Ruud] Van Nistelrooy, fantastic players.

"Ours are different types of players but I like someone who can finish half a chance and Harry does that, but Harry's a Tottenham player."

With United's transfer dealings having come under scrutiny in previous seasons, the club are reportedly still in search of a director of football.

One name consistently linked with taking up the position has been former United goalkeeper Van der Sar, who has enjoyed success as Ajax's chief executive officer. 

However, Van der Sar says he is not considering leaving the Eredivisie champions at the moment, telling BT Sport: "I've said before, I want to make this a success at Ajax.

"As a player, you always needed to build up qualities and your strengths. Now I'm trying it out and experiencing a lot of different things here, I've still some unfinished business here.

"If we could have taken it one step further last year [getting to the Champions League final], it could have been a step already, but at the moment I'm concentrating on Ajax."

Manchester United deserved not to have Marcus Rashford's opener against Liverpool ruled out by VAR, according to Roy Keane.

Rashford tapped home Daniel James' cross in the 36th minute to put United 1-0 up at Old Trafford, finishing a move that started when Divock Origi lost the ball in a challenge from Victor Lindelof.

Replays appeared to show Lindelof making contact with Origi's leg, but the decision to allow the goal was upheld.

Jurgen Klopp was further annoyed when Sadio Mane saw a potential equaliser before half-time ruled out for handball following an intervention from VAR.

"Sometimes you need a few breaks in this game and United got a few breaks, but maybe they've earned it. They've been the best team," said former Red Devils midfielder Keane on Sky Sports.

Graeme Souness, an ex-Liverpool midfielder and manager, believed Rashford's strike should have been ruled out.

"I think Lindelof catches the inside of [Origi's] left leg and any way you look at it it's a foul," said Souness.

"It's a foul when you come through the back of someone, regardless of his touch. Origi has been kicked, below his left knee.

"The term is, what, 'not sufficient contact'? If you kick someone from behind it's a foul, not up for discussion."

Former United boss Jose Mourinho was unwilling to offer an opinion, though. He said: "Can I run away from it and focus on what happened after?

"Before the game I was speaking about Rashford being the only point of counter-attack. United surprised because they have two, playing with James and Rashford in a position as two wide strikers. For this goal, they transitioned well."

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