Matthew Wolff equalled a U.S. Open record and is on track to make further history after taking a two-stroke lead in the third round.

Wolff carded a five-under 65 on Saturday, equalling the lowest round produced at Winged Foot at a U.S. Open.

The 21-year-old American blitzed the front nine in New York, making five birdies before a consistent back nine included a bogey and birdie.

Wolff's round came after hitting just two of 14 fairways, but he reached five under and a two-shot lead.

His 65 matched the round Justin Thomas managed on Thursday to set the record at Winged Foot.

If he wins, Wolff would become the first player to claim the U.S. Open on tournament debut since Francis Ouimet in 1913.

Bryson DeChambeau (70) sits second at three under and Louis Oosthuizen (68) is the only other player under par at one under.

DeChambeau opened his round with back-to-back bogeys before picking up a shot at the seventh.

The American then made birdies at 16 and 17, but could only manage a bogey at the par-four 18th.

Oosthuizen, the 2010 Open Championship winner, is also in contention after mixing four birdies with two bogeys.

Hideki Matsuyama (70), Xander Schauffele (70) and Harris English (72) are at even par, a shot ahead of Rory McIlroy (68).

But it was a forgettable third round, and in particular back nine, for overnight leader Patrick Reed.

The 2018 Masters champion was one under through nine holes before falling apart to shoot a 77 and sit at three over, tied for 11th.

Reed bogeyed six of his final nine holes and had a double bogey at the 11th, where he struggled to recover from the rough.

Thomas is at four over, while world number one Dustin Johnson was again unable to get much going, shooting a 72 to be at five over.

Patrick Reed said he is feeling confident after claiming the U.S. Open lead as the former Masters champion eyes a second major crown.

Reed tops the leaderboard by one stroke at the halfway stage following his even-par-70 in the second round at the unforgiving Winged Foot Golf Club on Friday.

Winner of the 2018 Masters, Reed was a shot off the pace after round one but used five birdies to replace Justin Thomas atop the standings in tricky conditions in New York.

After improving to four under through 36 holes, American golfer Reed told reporters: "I feel good. I feel ready to go out and put myself in position hopefully tomorrow [Saturday] to have a chance late on Sunday.

"But I think that's the biggest thing is I feel like the game is where it needs to be. I feel good.

"I just need to tighten a few things up here or there, but the short game is sharp, and when I play around a place like this, that's what you need."

Winged Foot proved troublesome again on another tough scoring day as 15-time major winner Tiger Woods, defending champion Gary Woodland, former world number one Jordan Spieth and Phil Mickelson were among the masses to miss the cut.

But Reed managed to tame the course following his opening-round 66, a mixed day featuring five birdies and as many bogeys as he ended the round ahead of surging countryman Bryson DeChambeau.

"Any time you play in the U.S. Open you know that you're going to have one of those days that things just aren't quite going your way," Reed said. "I felt like I left a decent amount of shots out there, felt like I was a little loose with some shots off the tee and also irons.

"To be able to feel like that and come out and shoot even par around a day like today, it's definitely a positive and makes you feel good going into the weekend."

Reed will play alongside rival DeChambeau on Saturday as the pair chase silverware and he added: "It's going to be good.

"I look forward to playing with him. I always enjoy playing with Bryson. It's kind of one of those things that we go out there, and I think around here it's not really as much on who you're playing with because you're out there attacking the golf course. This golf course you have to think about every little thing off of tee shots, iron shots, putts, everything.

"You don't really hang out with the guys you're playing with as much because you're too busy trying to figure out where you're trying to play this golf course and kind of put it together like a puzzle.

"I think that's the thing about the U.S. Open, there's not as much talking going on at the U.S. Open as there is other golf tournaments because it's a premium on every single golf shot. You let up once and you're going to make a mess of the golf course."

Patrick Reed is the man to beat at the halfway mark of the U.S. Open after earning a one-shot lead in his pursuit of a second major title, while Tiger Woods was among the big names who failed to qualify for the weekend.

Reed – the 2018 Masters champion – carded an even-par-70 to move top of the leaderboard through two rounds in tricky conditions at Winged Foot Golf Club on Friday.

American golfer Reed was a stroke behind overnight leader and countryman Justin Thomas heading into day two in New York, where the rescheduled major is taking place behind closed doors amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Reed, who made a memorable hole-in-one in the opening round, replaced Thomas atop the standings thanks to a mixed day, which included five birdies and as many bogeys.

A controversial figure on the PGA Tour following accusations of cheating during last year's Hero World Challenge, Reed started on the back nine and birdied his second hole but had three bogeys in a five-hole stretch – that also included another birdie – approaching the turn.

Reed tallied two birdies and two bogeys before closing his round with a birdie at the last to end the day four under and ahead of surging American Bryson DeChambeau (68), who improved 12 positions.

Rafa Cabrera Bello (70), Harris English (70) and former world number one Thomas (73) are tied for third and two shots off the pace heading into Saturday's third round.

Thomas set the record for the lowest score posted in a U.S. Open at Winged Foot with a first-round 65, but he was unable to repeat the feat on a tough day.

Jon Rahm (72) closed the round one over through 36 holes, while world number one and FedEx Cup champion Dustin Johnson (70) is two strokes worse off following back-to-back rounds in the 70s.

Johnson – the 2016 winner – is three over alongside four-time major champion Rory McIlroy, who endured a forgettable round following a six-over-par 76.

In contention after round one, Northern Irish star McIlroy – seeking his first major trophy since 2014 – fell 17 positions on the back of a double bogey, seven bogeys and just three birdies.

As for Woods, he missed the cut and the 15-time major winner was not alone as defending champion Gary Woodland (74), Jordan Spieth (81) and Phil Mickelson (74) also fell short of the six-over line.

Three-time U.S. Open champion Woods finished with a score of 10 over after shooting a second-round 77, which included two double bogeys and five bogeys.

It was a horrible day for 2015 champion Spieth, whose woes continued as he bowed out at 14 over after going through the second round without a birdie, instead holding a double bogey and nine bogeys.

Justin Thomas set the early pace at the U.S. Open, where a record-breaking five-under-par 65 gave the former world number one a one-shot lead following the opening round.

Three straight birdies from the ninth and another at the last helped take Thomas to the top of the leaderboard with the lowest score recorded in a U.S. Open at Winged Foot, surpassing the previous low of 66.

Thomas – the 2017 US PGA Championship winner – ended the first day ahead of Patrick Reed, Thomas Pieters and Matthew Wolff in New York on Thursday.

A course usually renowned for its thick rough and brutal greens, Winged Foot's West Course was surprisingly forgiving for the start of the rescheduled 120th U.S. Open amid the coronavirus pandemic, hence some of the low scores and the fact Thomas reached 14 of the 18 greens in regulation.

Former Masters champion Reed will hope to remain in contention heading into the weekend after ending day one just a shot back – the American's 66 helped by a hole-in-one at the par-three seventh, the ball taking just one bounce before sinking.

Reed was not the only player to ace the seventh, however. Will Zalatoris repeated the feat later, with Wolff also coming agonisingly close in a remarkable series of events.

Despite the disappointment of missing out on that ace, Wolff impressed and dragged himself into the frame with a run of three successive birdies after beginning the back nine with a bogey.

Pieters is right there on Thomas' tail as well thanks to his round of 66 – a best ever opening score in a major for the Belgian, who closed out the day with a birdie that moved him above Rory McIlroy on three under.

Four-time major champion and 2011 U.S. Open winner McIlroy, who has not added to his haul of majors since 2014, had four birdies and a solitary bogey in a promising start, while Jon Rahm opened with a 69.

But it was a day to forget for some of the big hitters, who will now require strong second rounds.

Defending champion Gary Woodland is at four over, a shot worse off than world number one and FedEx Cup winner Dustin Johnson, Jordan Spieth and Tiger Woods, with the latter – a three-time U.S. Open champion – finishing with a bogey and double bogey on the last two holes.

After a front-nine one-under-par 34, American golfer Woodland played the back nine in five over for an opening-round 74.

It was a miserable start for five-time major champion Phil Mickelson, who will enter the second round nine over – while US PGA Championship winner Collin Morikawa was three shots better off.

There was something strange happening at the seventh hole at Winged Foot on Thursday.

Patrick Reed carded just the third hole-in-one at the course in U.S. Open history early in the day, and a fourth followed from Will Zalatoris - again at the seventh.

The same hole had seen Matthew Wolff come agonisingly close to a repeat, too, in a remarkable series of events.

Reed and Zalatoris became the first players to card aces on the same day at the U.S. Open since Andy Miller and Scott Hoch in the fourth round at Bethpage in 2002, yet those two managed the feat at different holes.

Not since 1989 had the U.S. Open seen a hole-in-one occur on multiple occasions at a single hole in the same round. Incredibly, four players found joy 31 years ago at the sixth hole of the East Course at Oak Hill.

Reed, who stood second in the early running with a four-under 66, reflected on his stunning shot, which prompted a delayed reaction due to there being no crowd at the course.

"It would have been nuts [with a crowd]," he said. "Up here in New York, the fans are amazing. You make a hole-in-one and the fans will just go crazy.

"It's unfortunate the fans weren't here, because that would have been an awesome experience. At the same time, an ace is an ace. I'll take it either way."

Reed added: "Of course, I was excited about it, but really I knew from that point I still had to get ready for the next hole, because here at Winged Foot every shot you have to pay full attention to."

Patrick Reed made only the third hole-in-one ever seen at Winged Foot in a U.S. Open during Thursday's opening round.

The American stepped up to the par-three seventh having just made a birdie on the previous hole, and his day was about to get a whole lot better.

With 165 yards between tee and the pin, Reed's shot initially hit the green a few yards short but then bounced straight in, much to the 30-year-old's disbelief.

Reed, who almost looked embarrassed by the ace, subsequently moved to one under par, having earlier made double bogey at the par-four fifth.

The 2020 U.S. Open is the sixth edition to be held at Winged Foot.

Mark McCumber made a hole-in-one at the 10th hole when Winged Foot staged the major in 1984, while Peter Hedblom had his moment of glory in 2006 at the third hole.

Dustin Johnson took control of the Northern Trust with a seven-under-par 64, while Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy endured a difficult third round.

Johnson was almost flawless as the former world number one extended his lead to five strokes at TPC Boston on Saturday.

A two-time winner of the FedEx Cup play-off tournament, American star Johnson carried a two-shot advantage into the penultimate round.

Johnson – 15th in the FedEx Cup standings prior to the opening play-off event – surged clear thanks to an eagle, six birdies and just one bogey in Norton, Massachusetts.

Eyeing a 22nd PGA Tour title, Johnson holed a 40-foot eagle at the last to improve to 22 under through 54 holes, ahead of countrymen Harris English (66) and Scott Scheffler (67).

Louis Oosthuizen (68) is 15 under, while Harry Higgs (66), Daniel Berger (67) and Danny Lee (69) are a stroke further back following day three.

Defending champion Patrick Reed shot a third-round 68 to be 16 strokes off the pace and tied for 51st, a shot behind 2017 FedEx Cup winner Justin Thomas (71).

It was a tough day for Woods and McIlroy as the star pair continued to struggle at the Northern Trust.

After opening with a 68, 15-time major champion Woods has now posted consecutive rounds in the 70s following Saturday's two-over-par 73.

Five bogeys and just three birdies left Woods one under and out of contention, along with reigning FedEx Cup champion McIlroy.

Former world number one McIlroy is a shot worse off following his three-over-par 74, which consisted of two triple bogeys after seeing his chip shot roll backwards into the water on the second hole.

Dustin Johnson surged into the lead at the Northern Trust, but Scottie Scheffler stole the show with a 59 in the second round.

Johnson moved into a two-stroke lead at TPC Boston thanks to a stunning 11-under 60 – a career-low – on Friday.

The 2016 U.S. Open champion, and two-time Northern Trust winner, was in fine form and made a spectacular start to his round.

Johnson was nine under through eight holes before picking up shots at 10 and 11, but he parred his last seven to miss out on a 59.

The American is still two shots clear of Scheffler and Cameron Davis, the latter continuing his consistent start with a 65.

Scheffler, 24, became the 11th different player to break 60 at a PGA Tour event and second-youngest, behind only Justin Thomas.

The American made six birdies on the front nine and six on the back, making a four-footer at the last for his 59.

Danny Lee (64), Harris English (66) and Louis Oosthuizen (65) are a shot further back in a tie for fourth.

American pair Kevin Kisner (66) and Russell Henley (67) are at 11 under, a shot ahead of Kim Si-woo (64), Matthew Wolff (67) and Daniel Berger (66).

Meanwhile, Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy were unable to get going as they only narrowly made the cut.

Woods (71) and McIlroy (70) are at three under, making the weekend by a stroke alongside defending champion Patrick Reed (71) and Justin Rose (70).

One player not heading into the weekend is Jordan Spieth, who missed his third cut of 2020 after rounds of 69 and 71.

Thomas (67), meanwhile, is at seven under, a shot ahead of Jon Rahm (67).

Jim Herman secured his third PGA Tour victory with a one-stroke win at the Wyndham Championship on Sunday.

The American produced a brilliant seven-under 63 in the final round at the Sedgefield Country Club in North Carolina.

Herman finished at 21 under after weekend scores of 61 and 63, ending up a shot clear of Billy Horschel (65).

His weekend score of 124 tied the lowest closing 36-hole total by a winner.

The 42-year-old's triumph was his first of 2020, adding to his 2016 Houston Open success and last year's victory at the Barbasol Championship.

Kevin Kisner (64), Webb Simpson (65), Doc Redman (68) and Kim Si-woo (70) are tied for third at 18 under.

Patrick Reed, the 2018 Masters champion, fired a 64 to be among a group tied for ninth.

After making the cut, three-time major winner Jordan Spieth battled on the weekend, a one-over 71 in the final round seeing him finish back at two under and in a share of 72nd place.

Meanwhile, C.T. Pan produced one of the shots of the final round with a hole-in-one at the 16th hole.

Tom Hoge, Kim Si-woo, Talor Gooch and Billy Horschel are tied for the lead after the second round of the Wyndham Championship, while four-time major champion Brooks Koepka missed the cut.

The quartet of Hoge, Kim, Gooch and Horschel are one stroke clear atop the leaderboard at the halfway stage of the PGA Tour tournament in North Carolina.

Hoge was in a three-way tie for the lead at the start of the second round, joined by Harold Varner III and Roger Sloan, and the American maintained his position at the Sedgefield Country Club on Friday.

Five birdies and two bogeys helped Hoge to a two-under-par 68 to be 10 under through 36 holes, alongside 2016 champion Kim (65), Gooch (65) and Horschel (64).

Harris English (67), Shane Lowry (63), Andrew Landry (65), Doc Redman (64) and Varner (69) are a stroke off the pace heading into the weekend, while Sloan is a shot further back after his second-round 70.

Patrick Reed – winner of the event in 2013 – and US PGA Championship runner-up Paul Casey are among a group tied at seven under.

Former world number one and three-time major champion Jordan Spieth avoided the cut following his three-under-par 67.

Struggling for form, Spieth improved 25 positions above the cut line – three under – after opening the tournament with a 70.

However, American star Koepka failed to qualify for the weekend, along with defending champion J.T. Poston (66) and Justin Rose (67).

After he was unable to complete a three-peat of US PGA titles last week, Koepka's second-round 70 saw him finish the tournament two over.

Harold Varner III fired an eight-under 62 to be in a three-way tie for the lead as the Wyndham Championship first round was suspended.

Varner, Tom Hoge and Roger Sloan opened with 62s at the Sedgefield Country Club in North Carolina on Thursday.

Having finished tied for 29th at the US PGA Championship, Varner produced a bogey-free opening round that featured eight birdies.

Hoge got to nine under before a bogey at the last, while Sloan mixed nine birdies with a bogey.

The trio are two shots clear atop the leaderboard, ahead of Harris English, who carded a 64 to be outright fourth.

The round was suspended and later called off for the day due to inclement weather, with 33 players yet to complete 18 holes.

Ryan Brehm (five under through 14), Talor Gooch (five under through 16) and Hank Lebioda (five under through 16) are the best-placed of those yet to finish their first rounds.

They are tied for fifth alongside Wesley Bryan, Brian Harman, Kim Si-woo, Patrick Reed and Chesson Hadley, who opened with 65s.

Defending champion J.T. Poston, meanwhile, struggled badly to a four-over 74 to be back in a tie for 142nd.

Runner-up at the US PGA, Paul Casey carded a 67 to be tied for 25th alongside the likes of Sergio Garcia.

Three-time major champion Jordan Spieth was again unable to get much going, shooting a 70.

Ryan Palmer and Tony Finau are tied for the lead at the halfway stage of the Memorial Tournament, where 15-time major champion Tiger Woods narrowly made the cut.

Palmer carded a four-under-par 68 to join fellow American Finau in a share of the one-stroke lead following Friday's second round in Dublin, Ohio.

Finau was the outright leader when day two started, but a second-round 69 saw him head into the weekend with company at nine under through 36 holes at Muirfield Village.

Spanish star Jon Rahm is a shot off the pace after a five-under-par 67, while Gary Woodland (70), Chez Reavie (67) and Luke List (68) are tied for fourth at six under.

After opening with a 73, former world number one Jason Day posted a 66 to catapult himself into outright seventh position – four shots behind Palmer and Finau.

Back-to-back 70s has Jordan Spieth four under at the halfway point, one stroke ahead of another American star – Justin Thomas, who used a five-under-par 67 to climb 43 positions into a tie for 16th.

World number one Rory McIlroy's struggles continued after an even-par 72 saw him slip seven shots off the pace.

McIlroy is yet to finish in the top 10 of a PGA Tour tournament since golf resumed in June amid the coronavirus pandemic, and a double bogey and four bogeys left the Northern Irishman tied for 21st.

As for Woods, the American superstar barely survived to prolong his PGA comeback into the weekend on Friday.

Woods – in action for the first time since February – made a decent start but his second round was far more concerning amid back problems.

The 44-year-old, who opened the event with a 71, signed for a four-over-par 76 to close the day three over, just one stroke above the cut line.

Three bogeys from his first nine holes left Woods in trouble, but the five-time Memorial Tournament winner rallied after the turn by birdieing two of his final three holes.

While the likes of Brooks Koepka (75), Patrick Reed (76) and Phil Mickelson (74) managed to make the cut, Rickie Fowler (68), Justin Rose (76) and Bryson DeChambeau (76) failed to qualify for the weekend.

Patrick Reed is in full support of the decision taken to delay the Ryder Cup, insisting the presence of fans will make it "even sweeter" when the event takes place in 2021.

Due to the ongoing impact of the coronavirus pandemic, Ryder Cup organisers announced this week that the 2020 edition will be pushed back 12 months.

The United States will have home advantage next September when Europe travels to defend the trophy at Whistling Straits in Wisconsin, with the action unfolding between September 24-26.

While the PGA Tour has returned behind closed doors, Reed believes the Ryder Cup would not be the same if played out without a packed crowd at the course, as their presence brings out the emotion in the players.

The 29-year-old has experienced both sides of the occasion, too. He has lost twice on European soil, including in 2018 at Le Golf National, but was also a member of the USA team that triumphed in 2016 under the captaincy of Davis Love III.

Speaking after his opening round at the Workday Charity Open, Reed said: "I think probably if you asked everybody - captains, assistant captains, players, both organisations - that they're disappointed, obviously, that we're not going to play Ryder Cup this year, but at the end of the day I feel like they made the right call.

"The Ryder Cup is not the same if you have it at 50 per cent fans or if you have it at no fans. The fans are kind of what makes the Ryder Cup.

"You go in there and you - if you're the home team, you have everyone behind you, and if you're away, you want the hostility, you want people to kind of go at you. That's the fun thing about the event.

"So with either cutting fans back or not having them at all, I also don't think you'll get as much emotion out of players, and with that being said, I feel like it just wouldn't be a Ryder Cup.

"I mean, they made the right decision, and it's just going to be even sweeter whenever we're able to play next year."

The Ryder Cup will continue to take place in odd-numbers years in the future, with the 2023 tournament to be held in Italy.

With the 2020 Masters postponed amid the coronavirus pandemic, we have drawn from the well of the tournament's rich history to produce something unique.

From its inception in 1934 right up to last year's stunning triumph for Tiger Woods, this major has always delivered the goods.

While the Augusta course may lie dormant for now, echoes of a glorious past still ring around its verdant fairways and greens.

Using daily leaderboards from a selection of the most memorable editions of the event, we have created a Fantasy Masters.

And here is how a thrilling final round went down...

 

Jordan Spieth (2015) edged out Tiger Woods (1997) on the second play-off hole to win the Fantasy Masters following a thrilling tussle between the two American young guns.

The pair, both just 21, went out in the final group at Augusta as Spieth started Sunday's round with a one-stroke lead over Woods and Raymond Floyd (1976).

Spieth headed to the 18th eyeing a record low score, having become the first player to reach 19 under, but he fluffed his lines with a bogey as Woods capitalised to record a par and force his rival into a play-off.

After both sunk nerveless pars, Spieth stepped it up a gear on the 10th, draining a birdie putt to earn the green jacket following a wire-to-wire triumph.

Spieth racked up a record 28 birdies, finishing an aggregate 12 under on the par fives to underline his clinical brilliance.

Floyd came mighty close to making it a three-way title tussle but, after birdies at 12 and 15, he could not find another gain to force the issue.

Another home hope left to rue a missed opportunity was Patrick Reed (2018), whose 71 was his worst round of the week as he closed on 15 under.

Spain's Seve Ballesteros (1980) squandered an even better chance. Having got to 16 under at the turn following a fine front-nine 33, he ended up signing for an even-par 72 to finish five strokes off the pace.

Ben Crenshaw (1995), a winner here in 1984, took fifth place ahead of Ballesteros and Fred Couples (1992) with a 68.

At the wrong end of the leaderboard, Nick Faldo (1996), Arnold Palmer (1964) and Angel Cabrera (2009) ended on 12 under.

 

WHAT THEY SAID

Jordan Spieth: "It's the most incredible week of my life. This is as great as it gets in our sport. I'm still kind of shock a little bit."

LEADERBOARD

Jordan Spieth (2015) -18 (won on second play-off hole)

Tiger Woods (1997) -18

Raymond Floyd (1976) -17

Patrick Reed (2018) -15

Ben Crenshaw (1995) -14

Seve Ballesteros (1980) -13

Fred Couples (1992) -13

Angel Cabrera (2009) -12

Arnold Palmer (1964) -12

Nick Faldo (1996) -12

*Play-off result determined by average score, rounded to nearest whole number, on 18th and 10th holes across all four rounds

As sporting drama goes, few things are more reliably captivating than the final round of the Masters.

On what would have been Masters Sunday eve, we take a look at how the previous six Augusta finales have played out.

 

2014

Champion: Bubba Watson

Margin of victory: Three shots

Position after R3: T1 (with Jordan Spieth)

Final-round summary: Tournament debutant Spieth threatened to pull off a major shock when he pulled two clear of fellow third-round leader Watson - the 2012 winner - through seven holes on Sunday. However, a four-shot swing over the next two put Watson in charge and he ultimately triumphed with relative comfort. Spieth and Jonas Blixt finished three shots off the pace in second as Watson completed a 69 to secure his second victory at Augusta in three years.

 

2015

Champion: Jordan Spieth

Margin of victory: Four shots

Position after R3: 1 (leading by four)

Final-round summary: Twelve months on from his impressive debut, Spieth was a class above the rest as he cruised to a remarkable, record-breaking success. Only 21 at the time, the Texan had led after each of the first three days and demonstrated supreme composure to retain a healthy advantage over the final 18 holes. Spieth's lead was never less than three on Sunday and he equalled the lowest score in tournament history - matching Woods' aggregate of 270 in 1997 - despite bogeying the final hole. Justin Rose and Phil Mickelson, his nearest challengers, were four shots adrift.

2016

Champion: Danny Willett

Margin of victory: Three shots

Position after R3: T5 (three off the lead)

Final-round summary: Spieth looked set to record another wire-to-wire win and prevail by an even greater margin when he birdied four holes in a row to open up a five-shot lead with nine holes to play. Yet a stunning collapse lay ahead as he followed bogeys at the 10th and 11th by finding the water twice on his way to a staggering quadruple-bogey seven at the short 12th. That nightmare for Spieth left Willett in charge, the Englishman having just birdied the 13th and 14th holes up ahead. Willett could have buckled under the pressure, but he duly picked up another shot on 16 and parred the last two to finish three clear of Spieth and Lee Westwood at five under. 

 

2017

Champion: Sergio Garcia

Margin of victory: Play-off

Position after R3: T1 (with Justin Rose)

Final-round summary: For the second year running, the closing stages of the Masters provided outstanding drama, as Garcia and Rose slugged it out in a titanic duel. So often the nearly man in majors, Garcia was three clear of Rose after five holes but appeared likely to fall short once again as he slipped behind early on the back nine. A miraculous par save at 13 and an eagle at 15 revived the Spaniard, yet he then missed a five-footer for the win on the final hole. Amid increasing tension, Garcia eventually broke his major duck in a play-off, making birdie to Rose's bogey when the pair returned to the 18th. 

 

2018

Champion: Patrick Reed

Margin of victory: Two shots

Position after R3: 1 (leading by three)

Final-round summary: Rory McIlroy was chasing a career Grand Slam and expected to provide the biggest challenge to Reed, who began Sunday three clear at the top of the leaderboard. However, McIlroy slumped to a 74 and it was left to Rickie Fowler and a charging Spieth to threaten Reed's position. Spieth put together a stunning 64, but came up two short as Reed pipped Fowler by one with a closing 71 and earned his maiden major title.

2019

Champion: Tiger Woods

Margin of victory: One shot

Position after R3: T2 (two off the lead)

Final-round summary: Stormy weather meant an early start and groups of three, with players going off the first and 10th tees. Former Open champion and 2018 Ryder Cup hero Francesco Molinari's bid for Masters glory was derailed when he found the water at 15, a hole where Tiger Woods carded a birdie to assume the outright lead. Another gain followed at 16 and the likes of Xander Schauffele, Dustin Johnson and Brooks Koepka could not keep pace. A bogey at the last was enough to secure Woods' fifth green jacket, 14 years after the previous one.

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