Manchester United executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward said the Glazer family do not want to sell the Premier League giants amid reported interest.

Woodward addressed speculation linking Saudi Arabia's crown prince Mohammed Bin Salman with a takeover bid for United.

The Glazer family have owned United since 2005 and are not prepared to sell, having reportedly turned down two offers from Bin Salman already.

"Based on what I see, they're in it for the long-term," Woodward told the United We Stand fanzine of the Glazers. "With regards to offers or asking prices, my understanding is that there have been no discussions for a price for the club or anything like that. Every conversation we have is based on the long-term.

"The debt is a long-term, structured and similar to some other football clubs. It's a fixed amount for a fixed period of time which results in it being fairly cheap to service.

"It's just under two per cent of our annual revenue each year, so it doesn't really have any impact on us."

Woodward watched from the Old Trafford stands as United held unbeaten Premier League leaders Liverpool to a 1-1 draw on Sunday.

Marcus Rashford's first-half opener was cancelled out by Liverpool substitute Adam Lallana in Manchester, where the Reds' streak of 17 successive Premier League wins came to an end.

It was an improved display from Ole Gunnar Solskjaer's United, who have gone four matches without a win and languishing in 13th position – 15 points behind Liverpool.

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer scoffed at Jurgen Klopp's claim Manchester United's goal in the 1-1 draw with Liverpool should not have stood due to a foul, the Norwegian reminding his counterpart they are not playing basketball.

United controversially took the lead late in the first half at Old Trafford when Marcus Rashford converted from Daniel James' cross.

But Liverpool were angered by the failure to award them a free-kick in the build-up after Victor Lindelof appeared to catch Divock Origi.

After a VAR review, it was decided referee Martin Atkinson did not need to consult a replay, allowing the goal to stand despite Liverpool's protests.

Klopp said he was "100 per cent sure VAR would overrule it", convinced Lindelof had fouled Origi, but Solskjaer would not entertain such opinions.

"No chance," Solskjaer said when asked if he felt it was a foul.

"We’re not playing basketball. He touched him, but it's not a clear and obvious error. I don't think it's a foul."

While the contest may not have been a classic that contained remarkable individual displays, Solskjaer was impressed with the pair who combined for United's goal.

James' pace troubled Liverpool's defence, while Rashford's direct running and off-the-ball movement kept the visiting backline guessing.

"[His] best game for ages, maybe in the 10 months with me," Solskjaer said of Rashford.

"His runs off the shoulder, he chases, defends well, holds the ball. There was a nice little race with [Virgil] Van Dijk in the corner, where you could see the boy is growing and getting stronger.

"[James] has a great attitude, no fear. He's brave, he gets kicked and gets up again. He's a nightmare to play against when he gets space. The boy has been a delight to work with, and him and Marcus played well."

Manchester United stopped the rot at Old Trafford and slowed Liverpool's Premier League title charge with a battling performance in a tightly contested 1-1 draw.

Marcus Rashford opened the scoring in contentious fashion with his first goal for United in over a month to give Ole Gunnar Solskjaer's much-improved side hope of a memorable victory.

United's hope faded with five minutes remaining, however, when Adam Lallana struck for the first time in the Premier League in over two years to claim a share of the spoils Liverpool's second-half display deserved.

Jurgen Klopp's men went into the game as favourites but had to settle for a draw, and the key Opta facts marked significant milestones on both sides of a fierce rivalry which rarely delivers a dull game.

Reds' run falls short of City's record

Victory at Old Trafford would have seen Liverpool equal Manchester City's record of 18 consecutive Premier League wins, set in 2017, but they were denied at the last hurdle.

It was the first time Klopp's side failed to win a Premier League match since their goalless draw with Merseyside rivals Everton in March.

Rashford relishes big-game pressure

Though he made an inauspicious start to the game, wasting early opportunities to attack, Rashford – who scored a wonderful goal in England’s thumping win over Bulgaria in Euro 2020 qualifying – made amends when he converted Daniel James' cross after 36 minutes.

It was the England forward's 31st Premier League goal for United, of which 11 have come against 'big six' opponents, and his third against Liverpool.

Lallana ends two-year drought

Few Liverpool fans would have held out hope of Lallana grabbing an equaliser after his 71st-minute introduction given that his previous Premier League goal came against Middlesbrough in May 2017.

The 31-year-old was in the right place at the right time to turn Andy Robertson's cross home for his first goal in 29 top-flight appearances.

Solskjaer left to rue more dropped points

While United's performance was warmly received by the Old Trafford crowd, it was not the first time Solskjaer's side have faltered when in a winning position this season.

Indeed, no side has dropped more points from winning positions than United, who have squandered eight, though Solskjaer is the only manager Klopp has faced more than once in the Premier League and failed to beat

Klopp's fighting spirit lifts Liverpool

After a frustrating first half in which they had 56.9 per cent of the possession, Liverpool dominated the second and enjoyed a 77.5 per cent share.

Lallana's late equaliser was the 28th goal Liverpool have scored in the final 15 minutes of Premier League matches since the start of the 2018-19 season.

Premier League leaders Liverpool's winning start to the season was brought to a halt as they drew 1-1 against fierce rivals Manchester United on Sunday.

Marcus Rashford's contentious goal looked set to claim all three points for United in the clash at Old Trafford, but substitute Adam Lallana hauled Liverpool level late on.

The Reds are still unbeaten in the league this season and lead the way, although Manchester City's victory over Crystal Palace on Saturday means the gap is now six points.

Meanwhile, Mauricio Pochettino will not have been pleased by another unconvincing Tottenham display despite Dele Alli rescuing a point for Spurs against Watford.

Chelsea overcame Newcastle United, while Leicester City got back on the winning trail following their heartbreak at Anfield.

Marco Silva's Everton claimed a much-needed win over West Ham, with Aston Villa beating Brighton and Hove Albion late on. Wolves drew with Southampton and Norwich City held Bournemouth in Saturday's other encounters.

Our Premier League Data Diary sheds some light on the detail behind the big stories of this weekend's big games.

 

SEVENTEEN AND OUT FOR LIVERPOOL

Lallana may have scored his first league goal since May 2017, but it was only enough to earn Liverpool a 1-1 draw at Old Trafford, as the Reds failed to win for the first time in 18 Premier League matches.

It means, with 17 straight victories, the top-flight leaders fall just short of the Premier League record set by City in 2017.

Jurgen Klopp was furious that Rashford's opener was allowed to stand, though the goal means the England forward has now scored 11 times against "big six" opposition.

It was backs-against-the-wall stuff for United for much of the match, with the Red Devils registering their second-lowest possession figure (32.1 per cent) in a Premier League home match since 2003-04.

Five of the last seven Premier League meetings between the north west rivals have ended level – just four of the previous 36 encounters had been drawn.

JESUS RISES TO THE CHALLENGE AS CITY BOUNCE BACK

City's slip-up before the international break allowed Liverpool to open up an eight-point gap, but Pep Guardiola's side responded in confident fashion on Saturday.

Gabriel Jesus scored his 50th City goal to put the champions ahead at Selhurst Park, with the Brazil international becoming the seventh player to reach that milestone while being coached by Guardiola, joining Lionel Messi, Robert Lewandowski, Sergio Aguero, Raheem Sterling, Thomas Muller and Pedro on an illustrious list. 

David Silva added City's second, just 93 seconds after Jesus' opener as Palace succumbed to a 10th home league defeat since the start of last season.

City have now won 12 of their 14 away Premier League games in 2019, three more than any other club this calendar year, while in all competitions they have won 16 of their previous 19 meetings with Palace, scoring 47 goals.

Jesus has been directly involved in 58 goals in his 64 starts across all competitions for the club, including scoring 21 in his last 20 games when featuring in the starting XI.

ALLI SAVES A POINT BUT SPURS' SLUGGISH RUN ROLLS ON

A mix-up between Kiko Femenia and Ben Foster may have allowed Alli to salvage a point for Tottenham against Watford, but Spurs have now won just three of their last 12 Premier League games, keeping just one clean sheet across those games.

Lowly Watford thought Abdoulaye Doucoure's early goal was going to be enough, but the Hornets remain winless in the Premier League this season, failing to win their opening nine league games for the first time since 2006-07, when they went on to finish bottom.

Spurs made seven changes to their starting XI for this match, with Alli rewarding Pochettino for his faith as he scored his fifth league goal against Watford.

Watford lost Danny Welbeck to injury in the fourth minute – the earliest substitution of a starting player in a Premier League match since Daniel Sturridge for West Brom against Chelsea in February 2018.

IT'S...... JAMIE VARDY

After their late defeat at Anfield, Leicester returned to winning ways with a 2-1 victory over Burnley, albeit it was a triumph not without some controversy as Sean Dyche's side had a late goal harshly disallowed by VAR.

Jamie Vardy cancelled out Chris Wood's opener, heading home a cross from Harvey Barnes, who later became the second youngest player to provide two assists in a Premier League game for the Foxes when he teed up Youri Tielemans' winner.

Since Brendan Rodgers' first Premier League game in charge of Leicester on March 3rd, Vardy has scored 15 top-flight goals – two more than any other player.

In-form Leicester have now won four consecutive home Premier League matches for the first time since winning five in a row in May 2017, while the Clarets have won just 16 times from Burnley's 100 away matches in the top tier.

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer believes Manchester United's 1-1 draw with Premier League leaders Liverpool could mark a turning point in his side's campaign.

United looked set to claim a shock victory thanks to Marcus Rashford's contentious first-half goal, only for Adam Lallana to rescue a point for Liverpool late on.

The draw sees United move onto 10 points from nine league matches, though the Red Devils are without a win in all competitions since they overcame Rochdale in a penalty shootout in the EFL Cup on September 25.

Despite airing his frustration at United's failure to hold onto the points, Solskjaer suggested his side can treat the result as a watershed moment in their season.

"A great response from the boys. We know we have a team who work for each other and there's a great atmosphere," Solskjaer told Sky Sports.

"Maybe this will turn the season. They're disappointed in the dressing room because they know they should have won. 

"That's a really good sign for a manager, to see your team disappointed not to beat Liverpool. Our fans can see what's happening. We will get there.

"It's important to get results, it's the only way to grow confidence in what we're doing. A win would have been great but a draw is a step in the right direction. 

"Newcastle [1-0 loss] was a low point for us. We've got players coming back from injury and illness and we’ll only improve because more will come back very soon. I'm pleased.

"You can't look too far. You have to win games. We're Manchester United and need to win more games. It was a lost opportunity but we go to the next one."

Controversy surrounded United's opener, with Liverpool incensed the goal was not disallowed by VAR for what appeared to be a foul from Victor Lindelof on Divock Origi, though Solskjaer was unsympathetic to the visitors' claims. 

"No. It's maybe a slight touch but it's not a clear and obvious error," he said. 

"It's still a man's game, with tackles allowed. The [Liverpool] goal was handball so that is a clear one from [Sadio] Mane. We were at the right end of the VAR decisions."

While his manager took the positives, United goalscorer Rashford insisted United had to consider the result as two points dropped, rather than one gained.

"They have gained a point today. We lost two points. It's disappointing because it's such a big game on a big occasion," Rashford told BBC Sport.

"You always think positively as a player. You hope it will start a run for us. We are not in the best position and every point matters. Today we lost two."

Jurgen Klopp was concerned the pre-match media coverage of Liverpool's trip to Manchester United had made the clash "a banana skin" and, were it not for their hosts' late lapse, the Merseysiders' unbeaten run would have come to an abrupt end.

In the lead up to Sunday's solitary Premier League contest, much of the focus had revolved around the clear and obvious gulf in quality between the two sides.

Liverpool started the day five points ahead at the summit while United found themselves just one clear of the relegation zone – it's arguable there hasn't been such a difference in quality between them in the Premier League era.

Yet, Liverpool's first-half performance belied that of a side who were out to equal the division's record of consecutive wins and unbeaten in 25. They were failing to live up to the media's hype.

There was a nervousness about Jurgen Klopp's men that is rarely seen – without the injured Mohamed Salah, the onus was on Sadio Mane to be the inspiration, but even he appeared to shy away from running at the notoriously rash Marcos Rojo.

They were profligate, too, with Roberto Firmino slicing an effort horribly before hitting a feeble effort at David de Gea when teed up by Mane.

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer's setup was effective at causing some discomfort for Liverpool at the very least. A back three meant wing-backs Aaron Wan-Bissaka and Ashley Young were pushed high, therefore limiting the impact of the usually influential Trent Alexander-Arnold and Andy Robertson.

"United need a reaction. What we've seen this season, there's no evidence that they're going to win this game," former Red Devils captain Roy Keane told Sky Sports before kick-off, with fellow pundit Jose Mourinho later suggesting their only hope would come from "heart" and desire.

Marcus Rashford displayed both in abundance. The England international's pace and direct running caused each of Liverpool's centre-backs moments of panic.

But his predictability in terms of movement in the penalty area remained notable when failing to anticipate a free-kick delivery towards the near post, making no effort to get in front of Robertson, who cleared.

He didn't make that mistake again, however. With Daniel James released up the right flank, Rashford darted into the box and made movement towards the near post in front of Joel Matip, before then jinking in behind and prodding home the cross.

It was a laudable departure given the criticism often levelled at him, while it also highlighted his effectiveness on the big stage – it was Rashford's 11th Premier League strike against the so-called 'big six', representing 35 per cent of his goals in the top flight.

The goal won't be remembered or greatly discussed for Rashford's movement, however, rather the VAR farce that allowed for it to stand in the first place, for the shaky Victor Lindelof had seemingly fouled Divock Origi when winning the ball back for the hosts. Klopp went berserk and it was easy to understand why.

"VAR can be used to overturn a subjective decision if a 'clear and obvious error' has been identified," according to the Premier League's handbook on the technology, yet Liverpool were not spared, sparking further questions of its use in England.

VAR then denied Liverpool at the other end in the second half, when Mane handled the ball en route to finding the net. As frustrating as that situation may have been for the away side, Lindelof's haplessness in the move did provide encouragement.

For all the negative noise around United this term, the defence is the one area of the team to retain a semblance of pride, with only Liverpool and Sheffield United conceding fewer than them.

But Lindelof's awkwardness in that moment was a sign of things to come, even if the Swede wasn't ultimately to blame.

A poor cross from Robertson late on was allowed to sail through the United area and find Adam Lallana for an easy finish at the back post, Rojo having mystifyingly let the ball go past him in the six-yard box.

Nevertheless, Liverpool were rewarded for their persistence and clinched a point when they previously looked devoid of craft.

Perhaps Klopp's charges slipped up to a certain extent, but this particular banana skin surely won't be looked back upon as a turning point in the title race.

David de Gea passed a late fitness test and was named in Manchester United's starting line-up against Liverpool, who welcomed Alisson back from injury but were deprived of Mohamed Salah for the clash at Old Trafford.

United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer picked De Gea after the goalkeeper recovered from a groin problem picked up while on international duty for Spain, and Aaron Wan-Bissaka was passed fit in defence while Paul Pogba missed out in midfield.

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp handed Alisson his first start of the season after he recovered from an ankle injury, with Adrian dropping to the bench.

"Mo was not ready, he could not train with the team so I don't know where it came from, people saying he could play. Pretty much no chance for today, maybe for Wednesday [against Genk in the Champions League] we have to see," Klopp told Sky Sports.

"It’s a difference but not a massive difference if we cover it well. Mo makes the runs in behind so we have to cover these runs with somebody else.

"We played before without Mo, we don’t want to do it but it was clear we would have to do it at some point over the season. Today is the day we have to do that. We knew it for a few days so we could train for it.

Klopp had hoped Salah would bounce back from an ankle injury sustained in the Reds' victory over Leicester City but he missed out, and Divock Origi started alongside Sadio Mane and Roberto Firmino in attack for the league leaders.

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer sees parallels between Manchester United's preparation for Liverpool's arrival and the lead-up to last season's Champions League win over Paris Saint-Germain.

United have been tipped to struggle on Sunday in what could be a defining game for manager Solskjaer against the Premier League leaders.

But the absence of important players, plus their status as underdogs, reminds Solskjaer of the March trip to Parc des Princes, when a late Marcus Rashford penalty gave United a 3-1 second-leg win and shock last-16 victory on away goals.

Alexis Sanchez, Anthony Martial and Jesse Lingard were unavailable on that occasion, while for Sunday's match it could be David de Gea joining Paul Pogba in the Old Trafford stands.

"I can't say who is going to be available, but we'll have 11 men out there and it reminds me a little bit of the PSG situation," Solskjaer told his club's website.

"We had loads of players out, everyone writes us off and are happy about that because, how can I say it, everyone doesn't want us to win.

"But it's Manchester United people, the Manchester United family, and we need to stick together because the 11 men out there will definitely give us what they have."

United's medical room might be just as busy as it was in March but the team's form is decidedly different.

Solskjaer's men lost 1-0 at Newcastle United in their last outing and have not posted a league win since a 1-0 home triumph over Leicester City on September 14.

Asked if the international break brought frustration, Solskjaer said: "It has and it hasn't, because I think the boys needed some time to clear their heads.

"I think for me as well, as of course I was disappointed [with the Newcastle result]. Sometimes you get over a defeat quicker than other times.

"This time we were just eager to get players back, to get some players we had out for the internationals, just to get some confidence back and we're ready to go again.

"It's the perfect game for us and of course this isn't new. It’s the one we look for every year when the fixture list comes out."

Manchester United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is adamant the Red Devils will not have to wait 30 years for their next Premier League title as he aimed a dig at rivals Liverpool.

United have not won the league since 2012-13 and the struggling English giants are languishing in 14th position and 15 points adrift of Liverpool ahead of Sunday's showdown at Old Trafford.

Liverpool have not claimed a league crown since 1990, though the unbeaten Premier League leaders are on track to end their drought this season.

While United have fallen on tough times, Solskjaer is confident it will not be three decades before the 20-time English champions are back at the summit.

"Manchester United will bounce back and win the league," Solskjaer told reporters. "We might have to wait a while but I'm sure it is not going to be 30 years before the next title."

United welcome Liverpool to Manchester, having gone three Premier League matches without a win.

Solskjaer's side lost 1-0 at lowly Newcastle United prior to the international break, following a draw with Arsenal and defeat against West Ham.

"You never take a draw when you're at Manchester United, I want to go out there and get three points," he said. "We need points and we need to start winning. It doesn't matter if it's Liverpool, Manchester City or Brighton and Hove Albion.

"We know we aren't creating enough chances, we need to be more adventurous. One of my big philosophies is to play attacking football by launching attacks quickly, but to do that you need confidence to move the ball forward."

Solskjaer, who was appointed permanently in March after an impressive interim spell following Jose Mourinho's December sacking, added: "We had a good spell last season playing fast, fluid counterattacking football, but since then opponents have been setting up to try to stop us doing that. Either we haven't been given the chance or we haven’t been able to grasp it.

"Young, inexperienced players often want to play safe for fear of making a mistake. At this club we prefer them to take risks, because we know these players are good enough, but if you lack confidence you sometimes think twice instead of acting on instinct.

"Football nowadays is so quick in the moment of transition, teams spring back into shape so swiftly after losing the ball, that it only takes one or two square passes for the opportunity to disappear. I want to defend well in the sense of winning the ball in great positions to set up an attack. That's the next bit we need to get right."

Jurgen Klopp laughed off a question about advice he would have for Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, insisting the embattled Manchester United manger does not need any despite their historically bad start to the new campaign.

Klopp's league-leading Liverpool visit Old Trafford on Sunday with United off to their worst ever Premier League start, having taken just nine points from eight games.

United are 15 points behind Liverpool in 12th, with their woeful form leading to great scrutiny on club icon Solskjaer in his first full season in charge.

Speaking at a media conference ahead of this weekend's clash, Klopp was asked by a Norwegian journalist if he had any advice for his counterpart, eliciting a loud laugh from the former Borussia Dortmund boss.

"He doesn't need it. He is in that club altogether now for 10-15 years. He was there as a player, he knows everything there," Klopp said.

"He made his experience as a manager in football. I know people think sometimes that a manager has to manage Real Madrid before you can take over Barcelona. That's not the truth. He knows, it just has to work out.

"That's how it is for all of us. That's why so many managers get the sack, if some people internally lose patience, then we have to go.

"From my point of view, it looks like he's settled there, they all knew it would be a difficult job to do. Nobody loses against you because you are Liverpool or because you are Manchester United, it's about the things you do on the pitch.

"On the other side they are all on their toes, really motivated when you come there and have a big name and that's part of the challenge we all face.

"I don't think you have to worry about Ole, he is in a good position and has the chance to win a game. We want to make sure that will not happen."

Solskjaer's record through 29 Premier League games in charge of United is actually superior to Klopp's was after the same number of matches at the helm at Anfield.

Asked to compare Solskjaer's situation to the one he faced at that point in his Liverpool career, Klopp said: "I have no clue about his situation really, because it's not important what you are writing, it's more important what the board is telling him, Ed Woodward is telling him, what the Glazer family is telling him. I have no clue.

"I want every manager in the world to have as much time as he can get too bring through his ideas but you never can compare situations, our situation when I came in, their situation now.

"Man United is a massive club, it's a massive club and nobody is really ready to wait for success, it was in my case no different.

"If you would have asked after these first 29 games, all the people here in the room, I don't think there was 100 per cent agreement that I'm the perfect manager for Liverpool. If there was any doubt internally that would be bad, as long as it's only externally, that's not a problem really."

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has never felt the managerial job at Manchester United is too big for him, despite a dreadful start to his first full season in charge.

After replacing Jose Mourinho in December and initially overseeing a significant upturn in fortunes for United, Solskjaer has seen his side struggle mightily through the first eight games of the new league campaign.

United head in to Sunday's clash with Liverpool at Old Trafford 15 points behind the Premier League leaders with just nine to their name.

Twelfth in the table, United have endured their worst start to a Premier League season, increasing the scrutiny on Solskjaer whose only previous managerial experience came with the Red Devils' reserves, Molde and Cardiff City, with whom he suffered relegation from the top flight.

However, speaking at a news conference ahead of this weekend's encounter, Solskjaer said: "No, I've never felt it's too big for me. I'm confident in what we're trying to do and confident in my staff.

"The coaching and what's happening here every single day, I've been so impressed. The improvement is there to see for us. Of course, it's about results – start winning games, start scoring goals, that's the main thing. We need to create more chances.

"At the back, I think we've looked solid, but we haven't been adventurous enough, taking enough risks. If you watch the best teams around, they risk the ball more often than we do, they make runs in behind, and that's part of the process for the boys.

"When they're losing confidence, they maybe want to play it a bit more safe, but it's my duty to say, 'Come on, then – it's not safety that does it here. At this club, you take risks'."

Asked what is different from when he took over in the wake of United's 3-1 loss to Liverpool that ended Mourinho's tenure, Solskjaer replied: "The culture I'm seeing every day, the attitude in training, the desire of the players that are here, they want to give absolutely everything for us.

"At times [last season], I didn't feel they had the robustness, the mentality at times. We've been working really hard on the physical robustness, the conditioning. We've had injuries, but that's maybe part of the process.

"I remember when Jurgen [Klopp] came in [at Liverpool], if we compare, he also seemed to get a few injuries early on because of maybe the work load and intensity he wanted his team to play in… you don't see that any more. He can play with the same 11 every week. We'll get there."

Goalkeeper David de Gea is unlikely to face Liverpool after sustaining a groin injury on international duty for Spain, but Solskjaer provided a positive update on his condition.

"I don't expect him to play but it wasn't as bad as feared," he added. "When I saw the game, I thought, 'That's him out until the next international break', as we've had some long-term muscle injuries, but it's not as bad as first feared.

"Hopefully we'll see on Sunday who's come through the last two sessions. There are players here who have just started training and are on the verge of coming back. I can't really say."

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer insists he has no concerns over Paul Pogba's commitment after the Manchester United midfielder was pictured with Real Madrid head coach Zinedine Zidane.

Pogba, who has been in Dubai as part of his recovery from an ankle problem, was photographed meeting Zidane during his trip to the region for the Dubai Artificial Intelligence in Sport (DAIS) Conference and Exhibition.

The picture has further fuelled rumours about Zidane's possible interest in signing the player in January, with Pogba having been unable to secure an exit from Old Trafford in the previous transfer window.

However, United manager Solskjaer has no problem with meeting and has full confidence that Pogba wants to stay at the club.

"I've never heard Paul say he doesn't want to be here," he told a news conference.

"Paul is part of our plan going forward and Paul knows that. I've spoken to Paul many times. He's been playing through pain barriers. He's been criticised right, left and centre, but he came back, [against] Rochdale, Arsenal, he could easily have opted not to play them, but he wanted to play them.

"He wanted to try to get back, it was too painful, so we had that scan and now he's on the way back, he's mending, he's recovering, he's been on a few days off working and there's a picture. That's the way it is with Man United. I don't have any problem with that at all."

Solskjaer, who allowed Romelu Lukaku and Alexis Sanchez to leave for Inter without replacements being brought in, has previously said he would not keep a player at United against his will while he attempts to create a more desirable mentality within the squad.

United have struggled for goals this season, though, with injuries to Anthony Martial and Marcus Rashford further depleting their forward line, and they head into Sunday's match against Liverpool with just two wins and nine goals scored from eight Premier League games.

Solskjaer, though, is not concerned that the short-term drawbacks of his rebuilding work could mean he is not given enough time to reap the possible rewards of his long-term vision.

"The time is always right to make the right decision," he said. "It was the right time to make those decisions and go on with the squad that we have. The injuries didn't help, we're getting players back now and I'm sure between now and Christmas if you see a full-strength squad then we'll get the results.

"The last few weeks have been difficult, they have been, but it's not like two or three weeks will tell me they were the wrong decisions. They were the right decisions. Listen, [for] the culture that we want to build, I had to make those decisions. That's it.

"When you lose the majority of your front creativity that we started with, you're going to struggle to create as many chances as you'd like. The Newcastle [United] game, we had 75 per cent possession but you can't create that opening…

"The pressing up high has been very good, the attitude, desire has been very good, but as you say, not enough chances created, chances haven't been taken. Sometimes that's confidence, that's human nature, you see players missing chances that they normally would not miss. But it's up to us to keep working and get the ball in between the posts. That goal never moves. It's the easiest bit because you know where it is."

Manchester United executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward hit back at "insulting" claims that the Red Devils are being run by the wrong people and insisted Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is the right man to manage the club.

United have made their worst start to a league campaign since 1989-90, recording just two wins from their eight Premier League matches so far to languish in 12th place with nine points.

Going further back, the Red Devils have won six of their last 23 matches in all competitions – including a penalty shoot-out win over Rochdale United in the EFL Cup – and welcome unbeaten league leaders Liverpool to Old Trafford on Sunday.

Ahead of the showdown fixture, Woodward urged supporters to remain patient and get behind manager Solskjaer, who signed a permanent contract in March after impressing during a three-month caretaker spell in charge.

"The middle section of last season, after Ole's arrival, feels most relevant to what we want to achieve and where we want to be," said Woodward at the club's annual all-staff meeting on Thursday. 

"We saw a team playing fast, fluid football, with a clear representation of the style and philosophy the manager wants.

"Ole has also instilled the discipline back into an environment where we may have lacked it in recent years. He is building a squad that respects the club's history, in which players work hard and respect their team-mates. No-one is bigger than the club."

United spent around £140million on Daniel James, Aaron Wan-Bissaka and club-record signing Harry Maguire after finishing sixth in the Premier League last season.

But the 13-time Premier League champions allowed Romelu Lukaku and Alexis Sanchez to depart for Inter without bringing in a replacement, leaving Solskjaer light of options in attack.

That has led to further criticism of Woodward's lack of football acumen, with allegations that he is more focused on commercial deals worldwide than making United a title-winning force.

Responding to those claims, Woodward said: "The reality of Manchester United is we are a club in two parts. First of all, we are an incredible 141-year footballing institution with all that history, all that legacy, all that tradition and that tradition of success. 

"That can never, ever change. We need to keep that protected... what's important is the commercial side is never allowed to take priority over the football side.

"Like other football clubs, our commercial business allows us to reinvest in the football side. It's how these two interact with each other at Manchester United that results in us having a competitive advantage in this area.

"There is a myth that we have non-football people making football decisions, and I think it's insulting to the brilliant people who work on the football side in this club.

"Many of the senior staff on the football side of the club have been in their roles for over 10 years. Some of our scouts have worked with us for more than 25 years.

"We've expanded our recruitment department in recent years and we believe this now runs in an efficient and productive way. Player recommendations and decisions are worked on by this department and by the first-team manager and his staff, not by senior management."

Manchester United have tied highly rated full-back Brandon Williams to a new deal that will keep him at the club until at least 2022.

United also have the option to extend Williams' stay by a further year.

The 19-year-old has come through the academy system at Old Trafford and impressed as a left-back, earning his first-team debut this season when he appeared as a substitute in the EFL Cup clash with Rochdale last month.

He also started the Europa League trip to AZ earlier this month, while he was an unused sub in the Premier League games against Arsenal and Newcastle United.

Williams has found himself in the first-team picture as a result of Luke Shaw's injury but appears to have a promising future.

He made his England Under-20 debut in a 0-0 draw with Netherlands in September.

Williams' commitment comes at a time when United are struggling, with Ole Gunnar Solskjaer's side 12th in the table heading into Sunday's visit of league leaders Liverpool. 

Manchester United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer hinted the club could make a couple of signings in January as they look to recover from a difficult start to the season.

United have endured their worst start to a league campaign for 30 years, winning two of eight games to leave themselves languishing in 12th with nine points.

That means they go into Sunday's Premier League clash with bitter rivals Liverpool 15 points adrift of Jurgen Klopp's pacesetters, suggesting United might even struggle to finish in the top four.

United spent approximately £140million on the pre-season signings of Harry Maguire, Aaron Wan-Bissaka and Daniel James, though many have argued they are still well short of having a squad deep enough to achieve their goals.

Those suggestions have been exacerbated by United's numerous injury problems this term and, although Solskjaer does not regret letting Romelu Lukaku and Alexis Sanchez leave, he did confirm the club are looking at potential January reinforcements.

"In one-off games, you think we could've had a number of extra players with experience. Alexis and Rom [Lukaku] are goalscorers and good players but, at the moment, we made those decisions and they were the right decisions," Solskjaer told Sky Sports.

"That's the only way you've got to look at it. All the players here want to give everything for the club and for the shirt – that's a big thing.

"Every day that they come in training, and every day that they put the shirt on, they're going to give everything that they have. So, you can't really say, 'oh I wish I didn't do that'.

"We know we haven't had the results that we wanted, but I wouldn't have kept the players we sold. It was the right decision.

"We're looking at one or two new signings. We're one or two players light, and we've said that, but if the right ones are available in January then we might do something. If not, these players will give everything.

"January is a difficult window, anyway, but if there are players available and at the right price, I'm sure we will spend. There might be some experienced players who can come in and help the younger players – that might be worth the money.

"So, it depends on who is available. I'm not going to go down the route of bringing players in on big contracts and big fees if they're not the right ones for the whole group and for the future.

"The money is there. We've been looking at players and we were close to a couple, but it's not right if you don't get the right players. The money is there to strengthen in January and in the summer [in 2020].

"We're planning and we're looking. We're refining our targets, but just before the summer transfer window ended, the ready-made players weren't there. But the resources are there if the right players are available."

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