Australia head coach Dave Rennie said the Wallabies are disappointed after coming within a whisker of snapping their New Zealand hoodoo as the Bledisloe Cup opener ended in a dramatic 16-16 draw.

Reece Hodge had the chance to secure Australia's first win in New Zealand in 19 years and first in Wellington since 2000, but the replacement back's monster kick from inside his own half hit the post in additional time on Sunday.

The Wallabies ushered in a new era under Rennie – overseeing his first match in charge since replacing Michael Cheika, just like All Blacks counterpart Ian Foster – rallying through second-half tries from Marika Koroibete and debutant Filipo Daugunu, having trailed 13-3 to Jordie Barrett and Rieko Ioane five-pointers.

And Hodge almost snatched an incredible victory in the 83rd minute after the full-time siren sounded, however, his long-range kick cannoned off the woodwork in wet conditions at Sky Stadium, where James O'Connor eventually kicked the ball out of touch following nine thrilling extra minutes.

"We're disappointed," Rennie told reporters in his post-match news conference. "We're certainly not celebrating in the changerooms.

"We had our chances. I thought we played with a lot of courage."

"We let ourselves down," added Rennie, addressing the breakdown, though the Wallabies won nine turnovers – only the second time in the last decade they have won more in a Test against the All Blacks.

"We found a lot of space in behind them, we had a lot of ball but the quality of our cleanout just wasn't good enough and it's area we need to be better next week. We gave away 14 penalties and a big chunk of those were post-tackle."

"I'm really proud. We were under the pump early," Rennie said. "I thought we defended well for big chunks of the game, we were able to apply pressure through our kick game and scored a couple of good tries at important times.

"We had our chance right at the death, one off the post and then setting up of a drop goal and we ended up going wider. They put you through it!

"The quality of our clean out wasn't good enough and they were able to stifle a lot of ball. We knew the collision area was going to be important and they won that battle."

Both Australia and hosts New Zealand were playing for the first time in 2020 amid the coronavirus pandemic, with a strong crowd in attendance to watch the first of four Bledisloe Cup fixtures.

Wallabies captain Michael Hooper made his 100th Test appearance – becoming just the 12th different player to reach the century mark for Australia – and his 47th as skipper.

Hooper led from the front as the Wallabies impressed against their trans-Tasman rivals, after trailing 8-3 at half-time, with Koroibete and Daugunu crossing over, with the latter becoming just the fourth Australia player since the beginning of this century to score a try when their career Test debut has been against the All Blacks, per Opta.

O'Connor and Barrett traded penalties at the death, after Australia had led with 90 seconds remaining, setting up a grandstand finish.

"It was a good start to our year. We haven’t been together for almost a year," said Hooper.

"We've got a new group here and a few debutants tonight. I’m very proud of our team, they fought all the way through. Man, it was close … a kick off the post … but we go again next weekend and hopefully we’re up to the challenge."

Australia's Reece Hodge hit the post with a long-range penalty in extra time as the Wallabies and New Zealand played out a breathtaking 16-16 draw in game one of the Bledisloe Cup.

Hodge had the chance to secure Australia's first win over the All Blacks in Wellington since 2000 as the full-time siren sounded but the replacement back's 54-metre kick agonisingly struck the post on Sunday.

The All Blacks and Wallabies continued to go head-to-head for nine additional see-sawing minutes before the visitors kicked the ball out for a draw as New Zealand came close to claiming victory in a stunning finish in wet conditions.

It was a battle of the debutant coaches as New Zealand head coach Ian Foster and Australia counterpart Dave Rennie oversaw their first Tests in charge since replacing Steve Hansen and Michael Cheika respectively.

The All Blacks and Wallabies were both playing for the first time in 2020 amid the coronavirus pandemic, and a crowd was in attendance at Sky Stadium for the first of four Bledisloe Cup showdowns.

It was a lively start as the All Blacks crossed over first via Jordie Barrett – the younger brother of Beauden who missed the clash with an Achilles tendon problem – after the Wallabies were carved open but the former was unable to convert the try nine minutes in.

Led by centurion captain Michael Hooper – making his 100th career Test appearance – the Wallabies looked threatening in attack and continued to cause the All Blacks problems, but New Zealand managed to extend their lead to 8-0 on the boot of Barrett, who converted his first ever penalty at international level.

Having failed to capitalise on their possession and good field position, the Wallabies finally got on the board just past the half-hour mark when James O'Connor nailed his penalty.

The All Blacks thought they had taken a 13-3 lead into half-time after Rieko Ioane crossed over, but replays showed he failed to ground the ball following a swift breakaway – Australia handed a reprieve.

Denied a try on the stroke of half-time, New Zealand were not to be denied a second time as Aaron Smith shook off two defenders to put the All Blacks 13-3 ahead just four minutes into the second half, after Australia's O'Connor saw his penalty sail wide of the post minutes earlier.

Australia refused to surrender as they crossed over at speed, Marika Koroibete unstoppable as he powered down the left flank and grounded the ball to cut the deficit to 13-8 before debutant Filipo Daugunu levelled proceedings as the crowd went silent in the 63rd minute.

Daugunu – played in by an incredible through-the-legs from Nick White – became just the fourth Wallabies player since the beginning of this century to score a try when their career Test debut has been against the All Blacks, per Opta.

O'Connor and Barrett traded penalties down the stretch to level the match and set up a grandstand finish, which saw Hodge almost snatch victory for Australia inside his own half.

Over eight years since making his Australia debut as a fresh-faced 20-year-old off the bench against Scotland, Michael Hooper now stands on the cusp of a notable landmark.  

Having impressed for his country at the Junior World Championships in 2011, Hooper continued to catch the eye in Super Rugby with the Brumbies.  

A first taste of international rugby ended in a 9-6 defeat, but fast forward to October 2020 and Hooper is set to win his 100th cap against New Zealand when the two rivals clashing at Wellington's Sky Stadium in Sunday's Bledisloe Cup fixture.  

We take a look at some of the best numbers behind the Australia captain's career.


HUNDRED NOT OUT

Hooper will become the 12th different player to reach a century of appearances for Australia; George Gregan, Stephen Moore, Adam Ashley-Cooper, Nathan Sharpe, George Smith, George Genia, Sekope Kepu, Matt Giteau, Stephan Larkham, David Campese and Rob Simmons having also done so.

A 100th appearance will place him joint-11th on Australia's list of Test appearances alongside Simmons, but still 39 short of Gregan's overall record.

He has won 48, lost 47 and drawn four of his 99 games thus far, racking up 95 points for Australia in that time.

No forward has scored more than the 19 tries Hooper has tallied, with Rocky Elsom and Jeremy Paul his nearest rivals on 14.

Since making his debut, no player in world rugby has achieved more Tests than Hooper, with team-mate Kepu on 96 and All Blacks duo Aaron Smith and Sam Whitelock on 92.

Kepu has played alongside Hooper the most with 89 games, while Simmons (76) and Israel Folau (71) have also featured regularly with the flanker.

Whitelock and Kieran Read have each faced off against Hooper 22 times for New Zealand – more than any other players in his time as an Australia international.


LEADING BY EXAMPLE

Hooper has captained the Wallabies on 46 occasions so far, with only Gregan (59) and John Eales (55) leading out the team more often.

His 19 wins in the role is the fourth highest total for an Australia skipper, Eales leading the way on 41.

No one can boast more than the 10 tries Hooper has scored as captain, while only Stirling Mortlock (171) and Eales (156) have more than the 50 points he has contributed to the cause when in charge - and both that duo had kicking responsibilities during their careers.

Australia's new era will begin with the same captain as Michael Hooper was reappointed by Dave Rennie on Wednesday.

Head coach Rennie, who replaced Michael Cheika after last year's Rugby World Cup but began work in June, named a youthful first squad earlier this month - including 16 uncapped players, eight of whom debuted in Super Rugby this season.

However, there was still room for six-year Wallabies skipper Hooper, although no captain was initially indicated in the selection.

Rennie had previously said no decision had yet been made on the identity of his on-field leader, but he announced a "straightforward decision" on Wednesday.

"I've been really impressed with Hoops," Rennie said. "We've spoken a lot over the past nine months and it's highlighted his passion and commitment.

"He's a good man with an outstanding work ethic and he's a great role model for our young men coming through.

"He's keen to lead and is highly respected by the Wallaby family. In the end, his appointment was a straightforward decision."

Hooper added: "It's an absolute honour to be the Wallabies captain and I want to thank Dave and the Wallabies management team, as well as Rugby Australia, for their support and endorsement. 

"It's a privilege to wear the Wallabies jersey, I feel proud to lead my team-mates and to represent those players that have before and all Australians.

"I'm really excited about this group and the direction we are heading. We have already spent some quality time together, defining who we are and what we stand for and what we plan to achieve in the coming months."

Michael Hooper is not guaranteed to keep the captain's armband under new Australia coach Dave Rennie.

Rennie will formally assume the role next month and he revealed the team will be selected before a skipper is chosen.

The incoming Wallabies boss also expressed disappointment that Izack Rodda and Harry Hockings will not be at his disposal after refusing to accept pay cuts that were signed off by the Rugby Union Players Association and Rugby Australia.

After a tough spell under Michael Cheika, beaten 2019 Rugby World cup quarter-finalists Australia will hope for a brighter future under former Glasgow Warriors coach Rennie but he is not sure who will lead his team.

"We haven't spoken about captaincy at all, and I've spoken with Hoops a lot on various things," Rennie said when asked on a Zoom call if Hooper would stay on as captain.

"All we've talked about at the moment is earning the right to play, so it's about playing well enough to win the jersey and then we'll sort out who the captain will be."

Hooper recently stepped down from the captaincy role with the Waratahs and Rennie believes the flanker's performances have improved as a result.

"Clearly, he's not doing it at the Waratahs, and that's been good for his game to be honest, I think he's played really well. He's still leading, no doubt, he just hasn't got the 'C' next to his name," Rennie said.

"So, he's a strong contender for captain but we haven't firmed up any decisions around that; we'll just work out what the team is and then we'll select the captain. But there [are] lots of good leaders in amongst that group."

On the issue of Rodda and Hockings, both of whom have come in for heavy criticism, Rennie felt perhaps the full story had not come to light.

"I've spoken a lot to Izack, I don't know what's been reported, I don't tend to read a lot of papers, but the full picture probably hasn't been painted," he said.

"I had a good chat to him last week, but he's gone and the whole situation is really messy and could have been handled a lot better. So that's disappointing.

"With young Harry Hockings gone, who I think could have been an outstanding international lock, and with Izack gone, and when you look at guys like Rory Arnold heading off last year, there's certainly an opportunity for some guys [locks] coming through. So not ideal but it is what it is, and we've got to get on with it."

Michael Hooper has relinquished the Waratahs captaincy to experienced lock Rob Simmons for the 2020 Super Rugby season.

Simmons, 30, will lead the team into next weekend's clash with the Crusaders after Hooper gave up the role he took on a full-time basis in 2016.

The Wallabies skipper said the "taxing" nature of his dual leadership positions contributed to the decision.

Kurtley Beale will serve as Simmons' deputy.

"This is something that has been on my mind, in this environment, for a good 18 months," Hooper told reporters. "It hasn't been something that's been on a whim or anything like that.

"There's much more than just leading the team out on the park.

"I went into last season fully committed to the role but also before that having question marks over my position as captain."

However, star flanker Hooper indicated he wanted to continue captaining his country under new Australia head coach Dave Rennie.

"That's a fair way away, but my thoughts and ideas around that have not changed," the 28-year-old said.

"I still do think I have a lot of growing in myself, in my gameplay and my captaincy.

"There are conversations Dave and myself will be having, I'm sure, in the future. But it's also a bit of time off, so I'm dealing with the here and now and what that will look like."

Meanwhile, New Zealand international Patrick Tuipulotu has taken over as sole captain of the Blues after sharing the job with Blake Gibson last season.

A disconsolate Michael Cheika hailed his Australia players as "a credit to their country" after the Wallabies were dumped out of the Rugby World Cup at the quarter-final stage by England.

Despite starting superbly in Oita, the 1991 and 1999 world champions were ultimately thumped 40-16 as England defended superbly before pulling clear in the second half.

Australia head coach Cheika is widely expected to leave his role, having failed to oversee a repeat of the team's run to the final in 2015.

The 52-year-old cut a distraught figure in his immediate post-match interview, but he made a point of highlighting his team's commitment to the cause.

"I think the lads put everything they had into it today," said Cheika. "I want all the Aussies at home and over here to know that. They gave it everything; they put their bodies on the line.

"We made a few mistakes at different times, but they've given everything, these lads ... and they're a credit to their country."

Australia had more possession throughout Saturday's contest but could only manage one try, through Marika Koroibete, while England crossed four times courtesy of Jonny May (2), Kyle Sinckler and Anthony Watson.

"I thought we actually played quite well, especially the first 50-60 [minutes]," Cheika reasoned.

"We gave away two intercepts and they [England] defended well like you've got to, so the better team won.

"That's the way it is, you've got to suck that up sometimes. I was supposed to get this done for the people here and for Australians. I'm so disappointed."

Wallabies skipper Michael Hooper added: "We're really upset. We emptied everything into this and we didn't get it done, which is pretty gutting for a lot of reasons.

"Firstly, there's a lot of our guys who are leaving. Secondly, we had a great supporter base over here to push us along and we really felt it along the way. To not be able to do it for them and ourselves is pretty gutting."

Australia captain Michael Hooper conceded the Wallabies left themselves with too much to do against Wales after a poor first half on Sunday.

In what will surely be the key fixture in Pool D at the Rugby World Cup, Wales got the better of a strong-finishing Australia 29-25, having led 23-8 at the break.

Tries from Dane Haylett-Petty and Hooper himself set up a tense finish, but the Wallabies could not quite wrestle back control of the match.

Hooper was disappointed but keen to move on quickly, knowing Australia cannot afford to spend too long reflecting on a defeat that likely sends them into the same side of the draw as England and New Zealand.

"It was a close game between two very willing teams and it came down to the wire," he said.

"It was 17-6 [in the second half] - we had the momentum, we just gave away too many in the first half. In particular the back-to-back points really hurt us.

"Congratulations to Wales for holding us out.

"We'll review it now. Recovery is key. We'll review it pretty hard, but in this format of competition, you've got to move on pretty quickly."

Coach Michael Cheika offered a blunt assessment of Australia's defeat, adding: "What went wrong? We just lost by a couple of points - it was a tight contest and that's the way it goes sometimes."

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