Hideki Matsuyama made history as he became the first Japanese man to win a major tournament after claiming The Masters by one shot in a thrilling finale at Augusta.

Matsuyama was on the cusp of history heading into Sunday's final round, the 29-year-old carrying a four-stroke lead as he looked to replicate the major success of countrywomen Hinako Shibuno (2019 Women's British Open) and Chako Higuchi (1977 LPGA Championship) on the men's circuit.

A five-time PGA Tour winner before this success, Matsuyama withstood a wobble and the threat posed by Xander Schauffele (72) to complete a history-making performance in Georgia, where he triumphed at 10 under par overall following a 73 to get his hands on the green jacket.

Will Zalatoris (70) earned outright second position, two strokes ahead of former world number one and 2015 Masters winner Jordan Spieth (70) and 2019 runner-up Schauffele.

Matsuyama – four strokes clear at the start of the day – had extended his lead to five at the turn, but his title bid threatened to turn sour as Schauffele closed in and Zalatoris loomed.

After finding water at the par-five 15th hole, Matsuyama took the penalty and cleaned up for bogey as Schauffele continued to heap pressure on the Japanese hopeful, cutting the lead to two shots with his fourth consecutive birdie.

But Schauffele's pursuit of a maiden major collapsed when the American – seven back at the 12th tee before rallying – also found water before sending his next shot into the crowd.

Matsuyama had a routine par to move three shots clear with two to play, but he dropped another shot, his lead down to two ahead of Zalatoris as an ill-timed triple-bogey sent 2019 runner-up Schauffele down to equal third alongside Spieth – four shots behind.

It was Schauffele's first triple-bogey in a major championship – a run of 1,042 holes.

That was the breathing space Matsuyama needed as Japan's new poster boy held his nerve, doing what he needed to do during the final two holes in front of an appreciative crowd on the 18th, where not even a bogey could wipe away the champion's smile.

Matsuyama (2011) became the third Masters champion in the last five years to have previously earned low amateur honours, following in the footsteps of Tiger Woods (2019, low amateur in 1995) and Sergio Garcia (2017, low amateur in 1999).

Elsewhere, Jon Rahm (66) and Marc Leishman (73) shared fifth position at six under, while one-time major champion Justin Rose had to settle for seventh – five shots off the pace – following his final-round 74 as 2018 Masters champion Patrick Reed (69) surged into a tie for eighth.

Justin Rose remains hopeful of overhauling Hideki Matsuyama for his first green jacket after struggling in the penultimate round of The Masters.

Rose had set the pace heading into the third round at Augusta, but the one-time major champion fell four strokes adrift of red-hot challenger Matsuyama on Saturday.

Consecutive birdies to begin the round appeared to have Rose on track to maintain his advantage but back-to-back bogeys on the fourth and fifth holes saw the two-time Masters runner-up come unstuck.

One shot ahead during the weather delay, Rose fell away when play resumed – the Englishman signing for a second successive 72 in Georgia.

"I didn't play well enough today, simple as that really," said Rose as he eyes his maiden Masters crown.

"I think all in all, to have a shot tomorrow, I'm delighted. I have that freedom to take a run at it, and of course I'd love to kind of stay with it just a little bit better.

"I've been playing with the lead the whole week, and obviously there's been an hour of golf where Hideki has moved out there in front.

"You know, all the guys chasing at seven under are all capable of that little run that Hideki has had, so it's all up for grabs tomorrow."

Rose added: "I was pretty happy just to be able to walk into the clubhouse before I dropped another shot."

Rose heads into Sunday's final round level at seven under alongside 2019 runner-up Xander Schauffele, Marc Leishman and Will Zalatoris.

Schauffele improved 10 positions thanks to a third-round 68, which included an eagle, four birdies and two bogeys.

"It's moving day. It's Saturday," Schauffele said of playing alongside Japan's Matsuyama, who gained six shots in seven holes to seize control. "You want to play with someone who's going to shoot seven-under. You hope that it's yourself, and if not, you chase.

"You'd rather play with someone that's shooting 65 than shooting 74. It was nice to chase after him. He's an incredible iron player. This is a great course for him. I think he has a great record out here at Augusta National, and obviously he showed it this afternoon."

Leishman (70) – who finished tied for fourth in 2013 – enjoyed a strong finish, with two birdies from his final bogey-free six holes leaving him in a mix to become just the second Australian to win a green jacket after Adam Scott (2013).

"Obviously if Hideki plays well, he can control his own destiny," Leishman said. "But a lot can happen around here. I've seen it. I mean, I played with Scottie the year he won. I've seen what can happen.

"I've had bad rounds here myself and I've had good rounds. You can make up four shots fairly quickly, but you have to do a lot of things right to do that."

Hideki Matsuyama produced a flawless seven-under-par 65 as his stunning late blitz earned a four-stroke lead heading into the final round of The Masters.

Matsuyama – chasing his maiden major title and Japan's first in men's golf – made a huge splash on moving day at Augusta, where the 29-year-old seized control following a weather delay on Saturday.

After inclement weather halted proceedings, Matsuyama jumped out of the blocks and gained six shots in seven holes to leave overnight leader Justin Rose in his tracks.

Matsuyama – who birdied the seventh hole on a bogey-free front nine – was red hot following the turn, the five-time PGA Tour champion birdieing the 11th and 12th.

Unstoppable, Matsuyama eagled the 15th before following that up with back-to-back birdies at the 16th and 17th as he soared to 11 under through 54 holes.

Matsuyama – making his 87th start since his last victory at the 2017 WGC-FedEx St Jude Invitational – posted the first bogey-free round this week and his best score in 37 rounds at The Masters.

Xander Schauffele and Marc Leishman also made their moves to join Rose and Will Zalatoris in a share of second spot heading into Sunday's final round.

Runner-up in 2019, American Schauffele improved 10 positions thanks to a third-round 68, which included an eagle, four birdies and two bogeys.

Leishman (70) – who finished tied for fourth in 2013 – enjoyed a strong finish, with two birdies from his final bogey-free six holes leaving him in a mix to become just the second Australian to win a green jacket after Adam Scott (2013).

The penultimate day did not go according to plan for Englishman Rose, who signed for a second consecutive 72 in Georgia.

It was a mixed day for Rose as the one-time major champion split three birdies and as many bogeys, while American Zalatoris (71) is also seven under overall.

Highlighted by an ace on the sixth hole, Corey Conners posted a four-under-par 68 to be outright sixth, five strokes behind Matsuyama.

Former world number one and 2015 champion Jordan Spieth – who ended his near-four-year title drought last week – will begin Sunday six shots off the pace following his 72.

Another former Masters winner, 2018 champion Patrick Reed, is four strokes further back after shooting a two-under-par 70 to be level alongside Justin Thomas (75) and last year's runner-up Cameron Smith (73).

Justin Rose felt having words with himself and taking a match-play approach was the turning point as he recovered from a poor start to regain the Masters lead on Friday.

Rose started his second round with a four-shot advantage courtesy of a sublime seven-under 65 at Augusta on Thursday.

The Englishman remained on seven under at the end of his second round following a level-par 72, leading Masters debutant Will Zalatoris and Brian Harman by just a solitary stroke.

Rose bogeyed four of his first seven holes on Friday, but three birdies on the back nine returned the former world number to the top of the leaderboard in his pursuit of a first green jacket.

The 2013 U.S. Open champion was content after turning the tide and revealed he gave himself a talking to on the eighth following a shaky start.

He said: "I had a little talk with myself on eight and said 'you're still leading the Masters', and I just changed my mindset a little bit and started to play match play against the golf course.

"I scratched a line on my scorecard and told myself I was three down and could I go ahead and beat the golf course from that point on. I had a putt on 18 to win my match one-up, but unfortunately it just slipped by. But an honourable draw."

He added: "I felt like the turning point for me, a good two-putt on number nine just to stop the rot and just to feel like could then just walk onto the back nine and try to build something fresh and something new. I actually started to play pretty well from that point onwards."

Birdies proved to be easier to come by for the field than during the first round, with Jordan Spieth and Marc Leishman among those to make strides as they moved into a share of fourth on five under.

Despite seeing his lead reduced, Rose - who has been troubled by a back injury this year - believes he "grew" during a mixed day.

He said: "I think it was a worthwhile day for me. And not having played for a month, and to suddenly find yourself in the situation I was yesterday, I'm not kind of brimming with confidence right now in that sense, so today was always going to be a challenging day.

"I felt like in the end, I felt like I grew a little bit from today, which is good."

Justin Rose mounted a back-nine recovery to finish his second round with a two-shot lead over Jordan Spieth and Marc Leishman.

Rose shot a sublime opening round of 65 at Augusta, but relinquished his four-shot advantage on Friday before returning to the top of the leaderboard with three birdies in his space of four holes.

The Englishman was the man to catch on seven under when he signed for a level-par 72, rallying after bogeying four of the first seven holes in his second round.

Gains at the 13th, 14th and 16th holes gave Rose momentum heading into the weekend as he bids to don the green jacket for the first time.

The in-form Spieth surged into a share of second place with Australian Leishman by carding a four-under 68, with birdies proving easier to come by for the field than on the opening day.

Three-time major champion Spieth, on a high after ending a title drought stretching back to 2017 at the Texas Open last weekend, made four of his five birdies after the turn and only dropped one shot at the 12th.

Leishman also made a significant move, setting the tone by starting with three birdies in row and going on to shoot a five-under 67.

Scintillating six-under rounds of 66 from Bernd Wiesberger and Tony Finau put them just three shots adrift of Rose along with Justin Thomas, who shot a 67.

Will Zalatoris, Brian Harman and Si Woo Kim were also well poised on four under, with their rounds still in progress. Defending champion Dustin Johnson had work to do back on three over through 10.

Bryson DeChambeau responded to a poor opening round with a 67 of his own to sit at one over, while Brooks Koepka (+5) and Rory McIlroy (+6) were facing a battle to make the cut 10 and eight holes into their rounds respectively.

Lee Westwood was a couple of shots below the projected cut mark on five over midway through his round.

Kevin Na and Sean O'Hair hold a one-shot advantage after the first round of the QBE Shootout.

Na and O'Hair hit the ground running at the Tiburon Golf Club in The Ritz-Carlton Golf Resort in Naples, Florida to lead the way from Ryan Palmer and Harold Varner III.

O'Hair and Na teamed up superbly in the scramble format on Friday, combining for a 16-under opening round of 56.

There were two eagles and 12 birdies for the leading duo, who went out in 27 in a blistering start to an event that is being hosted by Australian great Greg Norman.

Varner and Palmer are hot on their heels, sitting second of the 12 teams after coming up with eight birdies on the front nine and another seven after the turn.

Lanto Griffin and Mackenzie Hughes are just two shots adrift of the leading duo along with Harris English and Matt Kuchar.

Australian duo Marc Leishman and Cameron Smith are among three teams who will head into the weekend with the most ground to make up on 10 under.

Brendon Todd and Dustin Johnson carded career-low PGA Tour scores as the former moved into a two-shot lead from the latter on a moving day that lived up to its billing at the Travelers Championship.

Tee times were brought forward for round three due to the threat of inclement weather in Cromwell, Connecticut, and Todd – chasing a third PGA Tour victory of the season – signed for a stunning nine-under-par 61.

Todd, who now leads at 18 under par, drained a tough 13-footer at the first and recorded four more birdies prior to the turn on Saturday.

A further four gains followed on the back nine and Todd rolled a birdie putt just past the cup on the 18th that would have seen him start the final round three clear.

"Whenever I get a two or three-week stretch in a row, I tend to be playing better by the end of it," Todd said in quotes reported by the Tour's official website. 

"That's just something I'm using to my advantage now after missing two cuts. I'm peaking in the third week and hopefully I can get it done tomorrow."

Johnson, whose last win on the PGA Tour came in February 2019, was playing a couple of holes in front of Todd and also went bogey free.

After going out in 31 strokes, former world number one Johnson made five birdies on the way home.

The American felt he left plenty more opportunities out on the course, though, with just two of his birdies made with putts of nine feet or more.

"I really felt like I controlled the distance with my irons really well and hit tons of good shots," he said. "I had a lot of really good looks at birdie."

The 2014 champion Kevin Streelman (-15) shot a seven-under 63 to sit in outright third, with Mackenzie Hughes (-14), Bryson DeChambeau and Kevin Na (-13) all in the hunt.

There was disappointment for veteran Phil Mickelson who had led overnight, though. The American great carded a one-over 71 and is now six shots back.

Rory McIlroy also struggled to get firing and the world number one is eight shots adrift after a one-under 69. 

Phil Mickelson is on course for his 45th PGA Tour title after surging into the lead following the second round of the Travelers Championship.

Mickelson – who celebrated his 50th birthday earlier this month – carded a seven-under-par 63 to top the leaderboard at the halfway stage of the tournament on Friday.

The five-time major champion was almost flawless at TPC River Highlands in Connecticut, where he holed eight birdies and just one bogey for the outright lead at 13 under.

After dropping his second hole of the day, Mickelson was blemish-free with birdies at the fifth, seventh and ninth before a bogey-free back nine yielded another five gains.

Mickelson – who won the tournament in 2001 and 2002 when the event was known as the Hartford Open – sits ahead of fellow American Will Gordon and Canadian Mackenzie Hughes.

Gordon dazzled with a second-round 62, while overnight leader Hughes saw his three-stroke advantage evaporate following a two-under-par 68.

On a day which saw Denny McCarthy test positive for coronavirus and playing partner Bud Cauley also withdraw as a precaution, world number one Rory McIlroy dropped down two spots.

McIlroy started the day three shots off the pace but heads into round three four strokes back following his two-under-par 68, which included four birdies and two bogeys.

Xander Schauffele (68), Brendan Steele (62), Brendon Todd (65) and Marc Leishman (65) are also nine under through 36 holes.

Former world number one Dustin Johnson posted a 64 to be six shots behind Mickelson, while Jordan Spieth (69) plummeted into a tie for 53rd.

Meanwhile, Justin Thomas (71), Justin Rose (73) and Bubba Watson (68) all missed the cut.

Marc Leishman is braced for a "very different" Masters, while the PGA Tour star is still dreaming of winning gold for Australia at the Olympic Games.

The Masters – originally scheduled for April – was postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic and organisers have identified November 9-15 as the intended dates to stage the rescheduled major at Augusta.

World number 15 Leishman has twice finished in the top 10 of the iconic Masters – his best result tied for fourth in 2013 in Georgia.

Asked about a November Masters, five-time PGA Tour champion Leishman told Stats Perform: "The greens are usually firmer in November. I have a friend who is a member there and he has always tried to get me to go there in November.

"I guess the course is as good if not better in November than it is in April. Very different, there will be different grasses, different winds, flowers won't be blooming.

"It will be extremely different but hopefully we can play that with crowds and get that atmosphere because that's one of the best things about the tournament."

The rescheduled Masters will form part of a condensed PGA Tour schedule – consisting of 36 events instead of the original 49 – due to the COVID-19 crisis, which has wreaked havoc on sport across the world.

The PGA Tour is planning for tournaments to resume behind closed doors in the second week of June after a number of events had to either be postponed or called off since mid-March in an effort to contain the spread of coronavirus.

The US PGA Championship, originally scheduled for May, has been pushed back to August, prior to the Tour's season-ending tournaments that comprise the FedEx Cup play-offs.

In September, three months after it had initially been due to begin, the U.S. Open will take place in New York, before the Ryder Cup gets underway two days later, while The Open has been cancelled.

Leishman, who claimed January's Farmers Insurance Open, earned top-three finishes at the Safeway Open (third) and Arnold Palmer Invitational (second) to be seventh in the FedEx Cup standings following a fast start prior to golf's suspension.

"Having this big spell, it will probably be two, three months before it's over, so I guess it will be easy to come back and try play everything just because we haven't been doing anything," Leishman said when asked how he will approach the jam-packed schedule.

"But I'm still going to try to play my normal schedule, which will probably be reasonably light, just so I'm fresh for the run at the end of the year – the PGA, the play-offs etc. It's flat out and hopefully there will be a trip to Australia in there as well. As long as everything gets back in order and we can travel, it will be hectic but a good hectic."

The coronavirus pandemic also forced the Olympic Games to be postponed until 2021 – Tokyo 2020 had initially been scheduled to start in July this year.

But Leishman – who grew up in the Victorian town of Warrnambool and represented the International team during December's Presidents Cup against the United States in Melbourne – is still eyeing a gold medal in Japan.

"I was really looking forward to that this year," the 36-year-old added. "I was in a good spot to be on the team. I'd love to be there to represent Australia. I was unable to be there last time [the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro]. The priority for me is to go and win a gold medal for Australia."

Marc Leishman is raring to go for the PGA Tour's return, though the Australian star admits playing without fans due to the coronavirus pandemic will be "very weird".

COVID-19 has brought sport to a standstill globally, with the PGA Tour forced to either postpone or call off a number of events since mid-March in an effort to contain the spread of coronavirus.

The PGA Tour is planning for tournaments to resume behind closed doors in the second week of June.

Leishman was in fine form before golf was suspended, with the world number 15 claiming his fifth Tour title via January's Farmers Insurance Open. He also earned top-three finishes at the Safeway Open (third) and Arnold Palmer Invitational (second) to be seventh in the FedEx Cup standings.

"I would've loved to have kept playing, with the way I was playing. I was playing great golf and enjoying it," Leishman, who was part of the International team which almost clinched an historic Presidents Cup win over the United States in Melbourne in December, told Stats Perform. "I haven't had an offseason for about 12 years, so I'm looking at that as a positive.

"Getting off to a really fast start, it's nice that when and if we do come back, I won't have to really push hard to get back to the top of the list – I'm already there, in the that top 10. The pressure will be off.

"Obviously I'd prefer it not to be happening but definitely looking at it as a positive, rather than dwell on the bad stuff because there's a lot of bad stuff at the moment."

Playing in front of an empty gallery is unprecedented, especially for superstars like Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy, and Leishman believes the pair could struggle without fans in attendance.

"It will be very weird," Leishman said. "It will be weirder for some than others, I'll be about in the middle somewhere. The guys like Tiger, Rory, Brooks [Koepka] etc that play in front of huge crowds every time they're out on Tour, it's going to be quite difficult for them.

"Then me, I'm about 70-30 in front of big crowds and very small crowds, so it will be all about trying to manage energy and get the focus up without having fans there to help."

While the Masters has been pushed back to November, the Open Championship was cancelled for 2020 – a particular blow for Leishman, whose best major performance was tied for second at the iconic event in 2015.

Asked if he had earmarked The Open as his best chance for a major breakthrough this year, Leishman – a two-time top-10 Masters performer – said: "Probably that. All the majors this year, well, I wouldn't say the U.S. Open – that would've been last on the list because the course. Not really up my alley.

"Harding Park, San Francisco [US PGA Championship], the Masters, then The Open. Those three events I would say. The Open is such a big event and an event that I love. I really enjoy playing that type of golf. That would've been my best chance, but I'll have to wait until next year now."

In the meantime, Leishman is enjoying a prolonged period at home with his family in Virginia Beach, where the 36-year-old has established his own putting green thanks to a burning-off method in the United States.

"It's different. I'm not used to being home this long, so that's very different. The golf courses are still open here. I think I've played three times in the last five weeks. So not much at all. Trying to take the positives out of it. Enjoying the offseason and the time at home with family.

"I'd be able to go [to the course] every day if I wanted to, but I don't think it's the smartest thing to do. It's okay if you go there and no one comes near you, but a lot of the time people want photos and I find it hard to say no. That's hard for me. I've been trying to stay away and chill at home."

"Obviously, I wouldn't do it in Australia because it could get out of control," Leishman said with a smile when asked about burning his grass. "But here it's a bit different. It goes completely dormant in the winter, so if I was to bag it up and take it away, it would probably be about 100 big bags of grass. So it saves my back a lot. It's controlled, it can't go anywhere. It's not like it's dry, it's a real slow burn. It's pretty amusing actually."

Tyrrell Hatton held his nerve to close out a maiden PGA Tour triumph at the Arnold Palmer Invitational by a single stroke.

Englishman Hatton went into Sunday with a two-shot lead but was taken to the wire by Marc Leishman amid unforgiving conditions at Bay Hill, where there was only one round in the 60s over the course of the weekend.

Rory McIlroy was one of the stars to suffer, as a run of five over in the space of five holes effectively ended his challenge before finishing tied for fifth with a four-over 76.

Hatton opened with a bogey but reached the turn three ahead thanks to back-to-back birdies.

He found water at 11, where a double bogey put his bid for glory back in the balance and he headed to the last one ahead of Australia's Leishman.

It was an advantage the 28-year-old managed to retain, carding 74 to finish four under for the tournament.

"It's hard to explain. It's just an incredible feeling," Hatton told the Golf Channel after his win.

"It was such a tough day today, actually felt like I was kind of playing myself out of it a little bit when I made double on 11. When I saw the scoreboard on I think it was the 14th green I realised I had I think it was a one- or two-shot lead at the time and I was a little bit surprised.

"But to hold on and win here at such an iconic venue, I'm just over the moon."

South Korea's Im Sung-jae finished third at two under, with Bryson DeChambeau fourth on one under overall.

Tyrrell Hatton opened up a two-stroke lead after the third round of the Arnold Palmer Invitational as players struggled in difficult conditions on Saturday.

The Englishman is on track for his first PGA Tour win, sitting at six under despite his one-over 73.

Hatton is two shots clear of Marc Leishman (72) and Rory McIlroy (73) after a tough third round at Bay Hill.

Having held a share of the overnight lead, Hatton mixed four birdies with three bogeys and a double bogey, but it was enough to sit top of the leaderboard.

Leishman and McIlroy were solid, making 14 and 15 pars respectively during their rounds, and are in contention.

Such were the challenging conditions, Max Homa was the only player to shoot a round under par with his 70, although he is back in a tie for 16th at one over.

South African Christiaan Bezuidenhout (73), South Korean Im Sung-jae (74), New Zealander Danny Lee (75) and American Harris English (74) are tied for fourth at three under.

Sung Kang, who shared the overnight lead with Hatton, battled to a six-over 78 that left him outright eighth at one under.

The South Korean was even through 10 before producing two triple bogeys – at 11 and 18 – including finding the water twice at the former.

Four-time major champion Brooks Koepka carded a nine-over 81 that included eight bogeys and a double as he dropped to a tie for 64th at 10 over.

Marc Leishman fired a seven-under 65 to capitalise on Jon Rahm's final-round errors and win the Farmers Insurance Open by a stroke on Sunday.

Leishman produced eight birdies at Torrey Pines, including one at the last, to claim his fifth PGA Tour victory.

Overnight leader Rahm squandered his one-stroke advantage in a poor first five holes that saw him drop four shots.

The Spanish world number three charged back into contention with a strong run beginning at the 13th and threatened to force a playoff.

Leishman's birdie at the par-five 18th left 2017 champion Rahm needing an eagle to be a chance of winning the tournament for the second time.

Rahm's putt pulled up before the cup to hand his 36-year-old opponent a first Tour triumph since the CIMB Classic in 2018.

"Number five, that sounds pretty good, and on Australia Day," Leishman, who finished 15 under, told reporters.

"Playing well helps but I didn't actually hit it that well off the tee today. Putting always [matters]. You're not going to win Tour events if you're not putting well and I putted as good as I've probably ever putted today."

"This feels pretty amazing. I wasn't expecting this at the start of the day," he added.

Rory McIlroy carded a three-under 69 to finish in a tie for third with Brandt Snedeker (68) at 12 under, while Tiger Woods (70) was a further three shots back.

Woods, who learned about friend and NBA great Kobe Bryant's sudden death after completing his round, congratulated Leishman on the victory with a hug and a handshake.

The United States completed a record comeback to clinch an eighth consecutive Presidents Cup at the expense of the Internationals following a lopsided singles session.

No team had ever won the Presidents Cup after trailing at the start of the final round, with Tiger Woods' USA 10-8 adrift of the Internationals heading into the deciding day in Melbourne.

But the USA made history as they sensationally rallied past Ernie Els' Internationals in Sunday's singles for a 16-14 win at Royal Melbourne Golf Club.

The Internationals, who were dreaming of a first Presidents Cup since 1998 having kept the USA at bay for three days, had to win the final three matches just to tie the 13th edition of the tournament in a tense finale.

However, the Internationals could only manage one as the USA collected eight points - a joint singles record - to defy the odds and see off the challenge. 

Woods wanted to lead from the front after teeing off for the USA in the opening match of 12 singles, and the record-breaking American did just that.

Having watched from the sidelines on Saturday, playing captain Woods produced another masterclass to blitz Abraham Ancer 3 and 2.

Woods, the youngest captain at 43, made it three wins from three at this year's event to surpass Phil Mickelson for most Presidents Cup match victories with 27 in total.

That set the tone for the USA as Dustin Johnson followed suit by collecting another point to level the Presidents Cup at 10-10 - the former world number one easing past Li Haotong 4 and 3.

Red continued to dominate the leaderboard as American villain Patrick Reed broke through for his first win of the tournament. Without his usual caddie following a fan altercation on Saturday, Reed steamrolled C.T. Pan 4 and 2 thanks to eight birdies.

A tough day for the Internationals saw Hideki Matsuyama squander a 4up lead to tie with Tony Finau, though they finally got on the board courtesy of Im Sung-jae, who took down U.S. Open champion Gary Woodland 4 and 3.

Cameron Smith put some wind into the Internationals' sails with a gritty 2 and 1 victory against star Justin Thomas, but victories from Patrick Cantlay (3 and 2 over Joaquin Niemann), Xander Schauffele (2 and 1 over Adam Scott) and Webb Simpson (2 and 1 over Byeong Hun An) proved too difficult to overcome.

Matt Kuchar went 1up on the 17th hole to guarantee a USA victory and spark wild celebrations among the team, Woods becoming a first-time winning captain.

The United States claimed their eighth consecutive Presidents Cup after becoming the first team to win the tournament when trailing at the start of the final day.

 

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