Peter-Lee Vassell, a Reggae Boy who was last season cut by his Major League Soccer (MLS) outfit, Los Angeles FC (LAFC), after the player only managed six games for them and six out on loan with United Soccer League (USL) outfit Phoenix Rising FC.

Vassell has since been seen training with Danish second division club, HB Koge, sparking rumours he was on his way there this season.

The playmaker’s agent, Damani Ralph, confirmed that Vassell was training with the club, but would not go into any further details.

“[Vassell] is currently on trial with HB Koge, and we are hopeful for a successful trial. He has now played in two friendly games and is doing well. This is as much as I can comment on right now,” said Ralph.

Vassell was a standout at high school, playing for Cornwall College and Montego Bay United, before he began his professional career with Harbour View FC, making 44 appearances before his move to LAFC.

He debuted for the Reggae Boyz in 2018, earning 16 caps, from which he scored six goals.

Now that Kemar Lawrence has left the New York Red Bulls for a new adventure overseas, we couldn't help but ponder where he fits among the all-time pantheon of MLS left-backs. Yeah, you know what's coming next.

We combed through the league's first 24 seasons to put together a left-back honour roll. There was no concrete formula for comparing all these players, but only time spent at left-back in MLS was considered for judging.

For instance, Greg Vanney may have spent most of his European club and US national team career on the port side of defence, but the easy majority of his MLS games came as a centre back. Meanwhile, Ashley Cole was a bona fide star left-back for years in Europe, but that splendid CV and his overall quality couldn't help him measure up here.

It was incredibly difficult to narrow the list down to 10, and even harder to rank everyone; if you asked me to do this exercise next week, the order below would likely be shuffled. With such tough choices, it should be no wonder that we're left with a deep, impressive honourable mentions group: José Burciaga, Paul Caligiuri, Wilman Conde, Ramiro Corrales, Joe Franchino, Diego Gutiérrez, Jordan Harvey, Joevin Jones, Rónald Matarrita, Ambroise Oyongo and Heath Pearce.

The model of consistent solidity beat out some pretty good players to sneak into the list. He's as reliable in his own end as he's been supporting possession for a decade. Now with the New England Revolution, Sinovic was another reliable part of several good Sporting KC teams, racking up 254 appearances, an MLS Cup and three US Open Cup triumphs with the club. 

Chris Wingert

In an MLS age when many teams struggled to find a dependable up-and-down left-back, Real Salt Lake didn't usually have that problem. Wingert worked 289 total contests for the Rio Tinto bunch, and helped them raise MLS Cup in 2009. The Long Island native was a field asset from the jump, stepping up as a rookie to help Columbus Crew SC claim its first Supporters Shield.

Jonathan Bornstein

The Chicago Fire veteran is one of just eight players who have earned Best XI honours for playing exclusively as a left-back. He was also good enough to be one of only three players on this list to play in a World Cup. Before spending several years in Mexico and Israel, Bornstein ably darted up and down the flank in 139 total Chivas USA contests.

Jeff Agoos

Yes, a good portion of Agoos' career was spent at centre back, including the entirety of a fruitful second act with the San Jose Earthquakes. In the early days, however, he was the power left back in MLS. Most concerned with defending, but also an underrated long passer, he manned the station as D.C. United won a pile of trophies.

DaMarcus Beasley

Who knew during his accomplished earlier MLS stint as a winger Run DMB would eventually return past 30 to rate out as a top left-back. There were plenty of open roads to attack in the six years Beasley spent playing the position for the Houston Dynamo, but they rarely ran through his sector. His one-touch ability in the build also made life good for the attackers in front of him.

Gonzalo Segares

For the first half of his 255 Chicago Fire outings, Segares was a key cog on a pretty exciting team that always seemed to fall just short on the last step to MLS Cups but eased its agony a little with an Open Cup crown. The Costa Rican spent the remainder as one of the few steady contributors on a team falling apart. Through all of it, he was a slick customer whether taking the ball away or moving it forward.

Wade Barrett

For more than a decade, Barrett was an under-heralded flank bulldog for some terrific teams in San Jose and Houston. Well, we're here for some overdue heralding. He was a tough, speedy jack of all left back trades who would run through a wall to win. And win he did, celebrating an MLS Cup and a Supporters' Shield with the Quakes before captaining the Dynamo to consecutive titles.

Todd Dunivant

There's a lot of guys known for consistency in this ranking, but perhaps no one was maintained an unwavering level of play for longer than Dunivant. Week in and week out, he was organized with the ball and active at the back. After a very impressive rookie season contributed to an MLS Cup win in San Jose, he went on to play the lion's share of his 306 MLS games (and win four more Cups) with the LA Galaxy.

Kemar Lawrence

Everyone else in this list played well more than his 129 league games, but the Reggae Boy was good enough in his five Red Bulls seasons to have a strong top spot case. It was nearly impossible to get behind Lawrence when you came his way, and few left-backs anywhere shifted gears from defence to the overlap faster. He'll now be keeping opposing flankers brutally honest for Belgian giants Anderlecht.

Justin Morrow

The Toronto FC mainstay has basically been a poster boy for this position for a full decade now. Whether used as a wingback (which counts in this ranking) or a more textbook left-back role, Morrow raids forward with skill and supplemental end product. He's an underrated defender who's routinely among the top tacklers in the league.

He's an eager, adept build booster — left-shading attack stars like Sebastian Giovinco and Victor Vazquez don't shine as much without Morrow supporting and spurring their rushes. It's no accident he helped spark turnarounds in both San Jose and Toronto, or he's had a hand in two Supporters Shield wins and three MLS Cup appearances along the way.

Reggae Boy Cory Burke may be finding his way back onto a professional pitch if his club, the Philadephia Union can have their way.

The 28-year-old Burke has been playing for Portmore United, despite having a contract with the Philadelphia Union in the United States’ Major League because he lost his P1 status early last year.

A P1 visa is applicable to athletes entering the United States to perform at a specific athletic competition as an individual athlete or as part of a team at an internationally recognized level of performance.

Burke’s misfortune was beneficial to Portmore United, for whom he turned out in the interim.

Burke’s paperwork was complete recently and he is now well on the way to being able to apply for a green card but until then, the Philadephia Union the team he has been playing on since 2017 when they bought him from the Bethlehem Steel, will be loaning him out.

The striker, who has scored 11 goals in his 20 appearances for Portmore, will now turn out for Austrian outfit, SKN St Polten.

Polten, the 2016 Austrian Champions, now sits ninth in a 12-team table, just three points from bottom.

“I think I found a pretty good solution for him. He is on his way at this moment,” said Philadephia’s Sporting Director Ernst Tanner.

“Everything is not written, but we have an agreement and Cory already has an agreement with the club.”

According to Tanner, the loan spell with St Polten is to get Burke playing at a high level again before his re-integration into the MLS system.

“I think they have a good situation for him, as he will join a club where the coach is a friend of mine and he knows everything about the player,” Tanner said.

“The goal is to give him match practice on the higher level than he has had so far and bring him back at the beginning of May if possible,” he added.

“He can re-apply for a green card by the end of April, and that’s what we have in mind. Loan him out until then and then bringing him back.” 

Reggae Boy Deshorn Brown will begin playing in the Indian Football Premier League this month after signing a three-year contract with Bengaluru FC.

Brown’s January 17 bow with IFPL side may be seen as unusual for a player from the Caribbean, the region known for heading to the United States or Europe for the most part.

But Brown, who says, maybe he was seen as an average player in North America, believes he can re-invent himself and make an impact in India.

“The MLS teams probably saw me as an average player so maybe we have to go far to get rewarded,” he said.

That fact has not deterred the 29-year-old though and he is looking at the next three years in as optimistic a way as he can.

“I always try to go to different countries to make a mark so that I can always be remembered,” said Brown.

“I always look for a challenge so I’m excited,” he said.

Brown began life as a footballer at St Elizabeth Technical High School before going to university in the United States, first at the University of Mobile in Alabama, where he scored 53 goals in 43 appearances, then at the University of Central Florida, where he bagged 13 goals from 16 games.

His talent took him into the MLS Draft before his final year at University where he was the sixth overall draft pick taken up by the Colorado Rapids.

He would move on from the Rapids after two years, switching them in 2015 for Norwegian side Valeranga, before going on to five other teams, Shenzen in China League One, Tampa Bay Rowdies, DC United, Lorca, and the Oklahoma City Energy.

The striker’s goalscoring form has not quite been at the level it was when he was at University and his movement throughout the leagues across the world is testament to that.

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