Andy Murray expects to find it tough going against Kyle Edmund in his second match despite making a promising start to his campaign at the Battle of the Brits event. 

In his first competitive action since appearing at the Davis Cup Finals in November, the three-time grand slam winner recorded a 6-2 6-2 win over Liam Broady on Tuesday. 

Murray admitted beforehand that he had little chance to practice before taking part in the exhibition tournament at the National Tennis Centre in Roehampton, stating before his opener that his main aim was to "get through" it with his body holding up.

The Scot has been troubled with a pelvic injury but, with his serve working well and showing the occasional glimpse of his undoubted quality, he proved far too strong for Broady. 

Still, he refused to get too carried away with his performance, describing it as "okay" during his post-match interview with Amazon Prime Video.

"I served pretty well, I thought I served well throughout the match. A lot of free points there – I've been working on my serve quite a lot," Murray said.

"I didn't hit the ball that well from the back of the court, quite a lot of errors and my balance didn't feel great. I wasn't timing the ball very well, but it was alright. 

"For a first match in seven months, I've not been practising much and not even doing that well in practice matches, it was alright."

However, Murray is expecting to have problems on Wednesday when he attempts to deal with Edmund, who began his campaign by beating James Ward. 

"He's fit, hitting a big ball, so I'd be surprised if I manage to come through that one," the world number 129 said of his next opponent.

"If I serve like I did today and hit the ball better a little bit cleaner from the back of the court, I'll give myself some chances. But it will be tough."

The event, organised by Jamie Murray, is following strict health guidelines as it is taking place amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Liam Broady hit out at the ATP and Australian Open for sending an email which he described as a "slap in the face" regarding conditions in Melbourne.

Qualifying has been impacted at the year's first grand slam due to poor air quality, with organisers facing criticism for letting play go ahead despite the conditions.

Slovenian Dalila Jakupovic retired during her match due to breathing difficulties, with the air quality in Melbourne in the 'very poor' range on Tuesday as smoke from bushfires in Australia cause havoc.

Broady, who was beaten in qualifying on the same day, hit out at organisers amid concerns over player welfare.

"The more I think about the conditions we played in a few days ago the more it boils my blood. We can't let this slide," the Brit wrote in a message posted on Twitter.

"The email we received yesterday from the ATP and AO was a slap in the face, conditions were 'playable'. Were they 'healthy'? Citizens of Melbourne were warned to keep their animals indoors the day I played qualifying, and yet we were expected to go outside for high intensity physical competition?

"What do we have to do to create a players union? Where is the protection for players, both male and female? When multiple players need asthma spray on court and they don't even have asthma? When a player collapses and has to retire due to respiratory issues?

"On tour we let so many things go that aren't right but at some point we have to make a stand. ALL players need protection not just a select few."

Conditions in Melbourne improved on Wednesday, although 'moderate to poor' air quality was forecast for Thursday.

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