Son Heung-min scored his 100th goal for Tottenham in all competitions as he netted against Leeds United, with Harry Kane the provider once again.

The South Korea forward, who moved to north London in 2015, has been in sensational form in 2020-21, and moved onto 99 Spurs goals with a cool finish on the break at Liverpool in December.

Son drew a blank in his next three outings, failing to find the target as Spurs went down 2-0 to Leicester City, before he had a goal disallowed in an EFL Cup win at Stoke City and then only managed one attempt at goal in a 1-1 draw with Wolves on December 27.

However, after Wednesday's scheduled game with Fulham was postponed, his landmark effort came against Leeds on Saturday.

Kane – who has now assisted nine of Son's 12 Premier League goals this term – whipped in a brilliant cross from the right, which his strike partner swept home first time.

Son's strike put Spurs 2-0 up just before half-time, with Kane's penalty having put Jose Mourinho's men ahead.

With 169 goals to his name, Kane is the only Spurs payer to have netted more goals than Son since September 2015.

It was also the 13th time Kane and Son have combined for a goal this season, which is a joint-record in a single Premier League campaign.

Son has scored 65 of his 100 Spurs goals in the Premier League – 35 coming from his right foot, 25 from his left, and the remainder with his head.

The former Bayer Leverkusen forward has also supplemented that tally with a further 33 assists, while he has scored 15 times in the FA Cup and EFL Cup.

Manchester United and Manchester City will once again face one another in the EFL Cup semi-finals as Pep Guardiola's side continue their quest to win the competition for a fourth consecutive season.

City prevailed 3-2 on aggregate against their neighbours in the final four last season, winning 3-1 at Old Trafford, where this year's single-legged encounter will take place.

United and City are just the second pair of teams to meet in the League Cup semi-finals in consecutive seasons, after Arsenal and Tottenham faced off in the last four in both 2006-07 and 2007-08.

Their 1-0 loss in the return was the second of three defeats suffered against Ole Gunnar Solskjaer's team in 2019-20, while the Manchester clubs played out a dour 0-0 draw in the Premier League earlier this month. 

The other semi-final is an all-London affair, with Brentford eying Tottenham as potentially their fifth Premier League scalp in tournament.

Josh Dasilva scored the only goal on Tuesday to sink Newcastle United and book a trip to Spurs, following triumphs over Southampton, West Brom and Fulham for Thomas Frank's men.

United were the last team to book their semi-final spot as late goals from Edinson Cavani and Anthony Martial saw off Everton at Goodison Park on Wednesday.

Solskjaer will aim to make it fourth-time lucky, having gone down to Chelsea and Sevilla in the FA Cup and Europa League semi-finals respectively last season, compounding the City reverse of 11 months ago.

The holders brushed aside Arsenal 4-1 in a Tuesday quarter-final – Gabriel Jesus, Riyad Mahrez, Phil Foden and Aymeric Laporte all on target at Emirates Stadium.

Spurs ensured the Brentford would be the only Championship representatives in the final four as Gareth Bale, Ben Davies and Harry Kane scored to complete a 3-1 win at Stoke City.

Both one-off ties will be played in the week commencing January 4.

This week, the English Football League pushed the final back to April 25, in the hope of being able to welcome fans to Wembley.

Liverpool will assess Jordan Henderson to see if he can face Aston Villa after it was confirmed the Reds' skipper misses out again against Arsenal in the EFL Cup.

England midfielder Henderson sat out Monday's 3-1 win over the Gunners in the Premier League having lasted just 45 minutes of the victory against Chelsea in the previous top-flight match due to a thigh injury.

Henderson was ruled out of the upcoming EFL Cup fourth-round match against the Gunners and remains a doubt for the fixture at Villa this weekend, and potentially also for England over the international break.

Assistant boss Pep Lijnders offered an update on Henderson, as well as Joel Matip (muscular) and Kostas Tsimikas (thigh), who are also unavailable against Arsenal on Thursday.

"Yeah, Jordan we will re-evaluate on Friday after this game to see if he's ready with Villa or at least to train with the team," he said.

"We have of course Joel, who was progressing well but won't be back until after the international break.

"Kostas needs few more days. He felt his thigh in the Lincoln game. We thought it would settle but it didn't so he will be out of the next two games."

Thiago Alcantara, who joined from Bayern Munich in this transfer window, is self-isolating at home after returning a positive test for coronavirus.

Lijnders said there are no concerns for the wider squad due to protocols in place at the club.

"Health and family are the most important things in life. We wish him a speedy recovery, but I wish everyone who is fighting this virus a speedy recovery," he said.

"It's a big compliment to our structure, we have testing in place with the Premier League but we also do private testing.

"The most important thing is following discipline rules, we're following disciplining rules, we test immediately when these things happen so everything is okay."

Lijnders said the win over Arsenal was one of the most impressive performances he has seen during his time at the club but stressed the EFL Cup tie against the same opponents is an altogether different test.

"It's one of my favourite games since I've been here, going 1-0 down, playing how we play, no ego, constant team play, being dominant in each game moment over 90 minutes, pressing and counter pressing," he said.

"I'm really happy with that game, we are happy of course.

"We go from the Premier League to the EFL Cup, so it is a final - it is a proper win or lose. Mikel has established a clear identity at Arsenal - they will try to improve, but that is the same for us, despite there being only two days in between."

Frank Lampard says he is proud of the way Chelsea responded to the challenges caused by the coronavirus pandemic and called on the Premier League and its teams to do their bit to help those further down the English league system.

It was confirmed by prime minister Boris Johnson on Tuesday that the planned returns of fans to stadiums in England, which was due to begin in phases from October 1, have been cancelled due to the rise in COVID-19 cases in the United Kingdom.

The Premier League responded by noting its "disappointment" at the decision, arguing that "a code of conduct developed with scientific experts and agreed by the government's Sports Ground Safety Authority, fans in stadiums will be as safe or even safer than at any other public activity currently permitted".

It added that £700million was lost by top-flight teams last season with the national game haemorrhaging about £100m a month as the pandemic continues to wreak havoc, with predictions over the futures of teams further down the Football League making for grim reading.

During the early stages of the crisis, both Liverpool and Tottenham were criticised for originally stating they would take advantage of the government's furlough scheme before going back on the decision after a backlash, while Arsenal announced a host of redundancies despite making moves in the transfer market.

Chelsea boss Lampard feels his club have led by example with their own response and expects the Premier League to do its part to ensure English football can navigate its way through unprecedented times.

He said: "Firstly on a personal note and being manager of this team, this club, the pride I have in how it dealt with the COVID situation in the beginning, not furloughing staff, or mentioning we would furlough staff then retracting that statement, making the hotel at Chelsea into a hotel for NHS workers to stay in, making considerable donations to charity. I thought the club covered itself very well. 

"In terms of football itself and the sport, I think it's important the Premier League as a collective looks at supporting the EFL and the leagues below and grassroots football, absolutely, because that's the base of why we're all here. 

"I managed in the Championship and know the difficulties because I was very close to [Derby County owner] Mel Morris and I understand the difficulties clubs are having. 

"I can't go too political because I don't know enough about the numbers but I do think clubs in the Premier League and the Premier League themselves have a heart and understand that. I'm sure as we move forward they'll make positive moves on that front."

Chelsea are preparing to host Barnsley in the EFL Cup on Wednesday, a match that will take place just a day after Tottenham's trip to Leyton Orient was cancelled after several players from the League Two club tested positive for COVID-19.

Teams in the EFL this season do not have to conduct mandatory coronavirus tests and it was put to Lampard – who confirmed Chelsea had paid for Barnsley's contingent to be tested – that inter-league competitions may be untenable this season.

"The bigger political question is a difficult one because of the circumstances and, again, I don't know the numbers," he replied.

"But if you want to isolate it to football and you want to talk about how teams in the Premier League can help clubs lower down in the leagues, we have paid for the tests for Barnsley, we're awaiting the results on that, we hope it's a positive answer in terms of negative results. 

"I think it's a sign of clubs in the Premier League think it's the right thing to do. Competitions like the Carabao Cup are important because of where they are in the chain of football and I think it's right what we've done. It seems most Premier League clubs are doing."

Edouard Mendy is having his medical with Chelsea ahead of a proposed move from Rennes, Frank Lampard has confirmed.

The Blues are said to have struck a deal in the region of £22million with the Ligue 1 club for the goalkeeper as Chelsea look to add competition for the under-fire Kepa Arrizabalaga.

Mendy is reported to have agreed terms on a five-year contract at Stamford Bridge.

"Mendy is having a medical as we speak, subject to that being okay later on he will become our player at that point," Blues boss Lampard told a news conference ahead of Chelsea's EFL Cup tie with Barnsley.

Kepa, a £71million signing from Athletic Bilbao, found himself in and out of the team under Lampard last term and his position again came under scrutiny after a costly error in Sunday's 2-0 defeat to Premier League champions Liverpool.

Lampard was asked if the arrival of Mendy could actually end up being a good thing for Kepa.

"Yeah, I don't know what benefits anyone in the long run, football is always in your hands and how you work going forward," he added. 

"Competition is always important at Chelsea. Mendy is in for that competition, it's an area Kepa himself wants to improve in his own performance. 

"It's in everyone's interests to try and improve. I'm not making any final statements on anyone at the moment, football isn't like that."

Lampard also revealed how Blues great Petr Cech, now Chelsea's technical director, was influential in the Mendy deal having starred between the posts during his career.

"Petr was important in that with it being the goalkeeper position," Lampard said of Cech, who also signed from Rennes in 2004.

"Cech was best in the world in that position for a while so he had a big say in that, I lean heavily on him when it comes to goalkeepers day to day, planning for the future, he's very influential." 

Lampard, who says he understands Mendy will not have to quarantine so long as he tests negative for coronavirus, sympathises to a point with goalkeepers like Kepa trying to rebuild confidence.

"It is the hardest position because of the individual nature of it and mistakes get punished with goals," Lampard said.

"I understand that and as a manager I have to be sympathetic to that point. I am very aware of that."

Football will eventually return following the coronavirus pandemic, but it could look a little different.

The sport's leading competitions have been suspended amid the global crisis, and FIFA president Gianni Infantino this week suggested the pause represented an opportunity to "reform football".

"Perhaps we can reform football by taking a step backwards," Infantino told Gazzetta dello Sport. "[There would be] fewer but more interesting competitions, maybe fewer teams but for a better balance, fewer but more competitive matches to preserve players' health."

But what could post-coronavirus football look like? What must remain? What should disappear?

Five Stats Perform writers have put forward their suggestions for how the sport can move forward.


NO MORE GROUP STAGES - Ben Spratt

Those seemingly most frustrated by football's packed schedule are the coaches of leading European clubs. Therefore, there is a simple way to lose four games a season.

The most exciting Champions League and Europa League matches - with greater scope for shocks - tend to occur in the knockout stages anyway, so why not play two tense legs instead of six pool fixtures to advance?

A return to the format used in the European Cup and UEFA Cup might mean renaming the continental 'Leagues', but it is a price worth paying. Just keep the Champions League anthem!


DITCH FA CUP REPLAYS - Chris Myson

Even before the coronavirus pandemic caused a host of postponements and cancellations, fixture schedules were a particularly significant issue in England.

The FA Cup initially got rid of replays from the quarter-finals onwards and has since extended that to the fifth round. But now they should go all the way.

This would impact the one or two lower-league clubs each year who earn a dream replay against a top team in round three or four, but the competition has lost some of its lustre with big teams often resting their star names in the early rounds anyway.

Often the additional fixture is an inconvenience, while a one-off tie increases the drama and actually boosts the chance of a lower-tier club achieving an upset.


GET RID OF THE EFL CUP - Peter Hanson

Another sure-fire way to ease pressure on the calendar in England is to ditch the EFL Cup.

French football is ending the Coupe de la Ligue after this season, meaning English football will be the only one of the top-five European nations to have a second domestic cup competition.

With early rounds dominated by second-string XIs and fringe players, and the 'bigger' clubs largely utilising the cup as a means to give minutes to expensive benches, there is little clamour for the continuation of the EFL Cup.


AXE THE NATIONS LEAGUE - Liam Blackburn

If we're looking to cut back, how about axing the newest competition, the one that has no history and remains a mystery to your Average Joe?

The thought process behind UEFA's Nations League – to have more relevant fixtures and allow countries to play those they are more closely aligned with in the rankings – is commendable, yet it was undermined by the eventual absence of relegation from the inaugural edition.

The format and its relationship with qualifying for the Euros continues to be something of a Rubik's Cube unless you're a rocket scientist.

If something needs to go, can the convoluted.


CUT THE CLUB WORLD CUP - Patric Ridge

Infantino's calls to trim a bloated calendar are sensible, but actions speak louder than words. Perhaps proof of his desire for "reform" would come with an early end to an expanded Club World Cup.

Although the new 24-team format would see the finals held every four years in lieu of the Confederation Cup, it still seems an unnecessary hindrance.

The competition has been won by the Champions League holders on all but four occasions since its 2000 inception and provides little in the way of entertainment. 

Given the first new-look Club World Cup was due to take place in 2021 and now the Euros, Copa America and Olympics have each been pushed back to next year, Infantino has the opportunity to disregard this particular folly once and for all.

April 7, 2018, December 2, 2017.

Two dates. Two important occasions in the life of Paul Pogba as a Manchester United player.

Some players have the talent to decorate a game but lack the ability and force of personality to dominate it. Other players can dominate a game but because of their personality, eschew any attempt to decorate it.

Into the first category, we can easily slip a player like Mesut Ozil, the Arsenal version and the Real Madrid version. Into that band, you could also insert the former Arsenal (go easy Gunners’ fans, nobody’s picking on you) and Barcelona midfielder Alexander Hleb.

The Belarussian could be sleight of foot and crafty for a 20-minute spell of a game, but slight of frame and craven for the next 70 minutes.

Into the latter category, Roy Keane would insert himself, robust in approach and manic in conviction, bossing the midfield and running a game while being totally unperturbed by his inability to do a stepover. Why do a rabona when you can use the energy to scythe through the opposing creative midfielder is the question Keane would ask through gritted teeth, after leaving an Ozil-type rival in a crumpled heap at the top of the 18-yard box. 

So Pogba has played 150 games for the Red Devils in all competitions since returning to the Old Trafford club from Juventus in the summer of 2016, notching 31 goals. He has played 102 Premier League games, scoring 24 times, with the other seven goals coming in 48 games across the Champions League, Europa League, FA Cup, League Cup and the UEFA Super Cup. Forget his price tag of £89 million pounds and reported 290k per week salary. The fact is, that for a player of his lavish talents, Paul Pogba’s numbers in a Manchester United shirt are poor. 

The two dates above represent the only two times any reasonable observer could say that Paul Pogba dominated a big game for Manchester United.

Of course, there are numerous games in which Pogba has decorated a portion; see his world-class pass to free Marcus Rashford for the lone goal which beat Tottenham Hotspur on January 3, 2019, in the Premier League clash in North London; witness his performance against Newcastle on October 6, 2018; see his contribution in the 2-1 win away to Crystal Palace on December 14, 2016. But here’s the problem.

Pogba wasn’t recruited to decorate games against the Premier League’s lesser lights. He was recruited to dominate games against the league’s traditional also-rans and inspire wins over the title contenders and champions league aspirants. That is why the man they nickname ‘Pick-axe’ in France has copped so much flak from fans and pundits alike.

 

The December 2, 2017 performance was Pogba at his brilliant best; quick of thought, precise of pass, strong as an ox and running like a recently serviced Jamaican taxi. He made the men in Arsenal’s midfield and defence look like children, straining to deal with the adult, who had imposed himself on their lunch-time kickabout.

The performance against Manchester City at the Etihad on April 7, 2018, was by far Pogba’s best in a Manchester United shirt. He dragged the team from a 2-nil deficit to a 3-2 victory in the manner of a trenchant baby mamma, shaking down her man outside the gambling house before he goes inside and loses all of the fortnight’s pay he just collected. That was his moment, the day he proved he could use his considerable gifts to put other wonderfully talented players in the shade.

Suffice to say, two statement performances in 150 games is not good enough for a club like Manchester United. It’s a poor return. And frankly, it is not good enough from a player of Paul Pogba’s ability. Their separation will be a popular divorce. Selah.

Claudio Bravo will start for Manchester City in the EFL Cup final against Aston Villa, with manager Pep Guardiola showing faith in Ederson's Premier League understudy for the Wembley clash.

City boss Guardiola has used 36-year-old Bravo as his goalkeeper in domestic cup competitions this season.

And the former Barcelona boss vowed he would stand by that policy for the March 1 trophy match.

The confirmation from Guardiola is sure to be warmly welcomed by Chilean Bravo, whose Premier League opportunities have been minimal since Ederson arrived at the club ahead of the 2017-18 season.

Bravo spent almost 12 months out of action because of a ruptured Achilles sustained in August 2018, so the Wembley outing will emphasise his City re-emergence and Guardiola's trust in his ability.

The ex-Barca and Real Sociedad keeper was still sidelined when City reached last season's EFL Cup final, and on that occasion Guardiola picked Ederson ahead of young Aro Muric, who had played in the earlier rounds.

"Last season I changed Ederson from Aro because we played against Chelsea," Guardiola said. "Chelsea have incredible high pressing and we needed to play for the build-up a little bit quicker and faster and better.

"And Edy was better in that moment than the young keeper Aro. Aro helped us a lot, I spoke to him before the final. But if Claudio is fit, he is going to play."

Trezeguet thumped home a stoppage-time winner as Aston Villa beat Leicester City 2-1 to reach the EFL Cup final.

The winger got on the end of Ahmed El Mohamady's superb cross from the right and sent a fine volley across goal and into the right corner.

It gave Villa a 3-2 aggregate triumph and left Leicester distraught, with the match having looked destined to go to extra time.

Matt Targett had given Villa a 12th-minute lead, but Leicester deservedly levelled through Kelechi Iheanacho in the 72nd minute.

Marcus Rashford has called on Manchester United to draw inspiration from last year's stunning Champions League comeback in Paris as they look to pull off a similar revival against Manchester City.

United were outplayed in a 3-1 defeat to their bitter rivals in the EFL Cup semi-final first leg at Old Trafford on Tuesday, leaving them with a mountain to climb at City in three weeks' time.

There are parallels with the situation Ole Gunnar Solskjaer's side found themselves in last March, when they headed to face Paris Saint-Germain in a last-16 tie after losing 2-0 on home soil.

On that night in the French capital, Rashford's last-gasp penalty secured a 3-1 win and sealed progress on away goals.

And Rashford, who wore the captain's armband and scored against Pep Guardiola's City, wants United to rediscover that magic when they travel to the Etihad Stadium.

"It is a different game with different players, but what we found in Paris we have to find that within us again," he told the club's official website.

"We have to go there, score goals and win the game. I think we are capable of doing it. But let's just focus on [Saturday's Premier League game against] Norwich for now and hopefully we can put this result behind us to bring the positivity back."

Rashford was proud to lead his team out for the first time and is closing on a landmark 200th United appearance, with only one more needed to get there, but the England forward is only concerned with results.

"It is obviously a nice feeling [to be captain], but at the end of the day it is the result that matters and we didn't manage to get the win," Rashford said.

"We will look ahead now to the next game, put this one behind us and go again.

"To be honest, the games have all come thick and fast. You don't notice the numbers going up so much.

"It is my 200th game and obviously it is going to be a good night for me. It is definitely a proud moment to play 200 games for this club.

"But if we don't get the three points then for me it doesn't mean a thing. We have to make sure that we win the game and put on a positive performance."

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer felt Manchester United's first half against Manchester City in the EFL Cup on Tuesday was the worst they have played this season.

City dominated the first leg of the semi-final at Old Trafford, where Bernardo Silva and Riyad Mahrez scored before Andreas Pereira's own goal.

Marcus Rashford struck in the second half for United, to give them a glimmer of hope heading to the Etihad Stadium on January 29 despite the 3-1 loss.

Solskjaer was unhappy with the way his side started, lamenting their first half – particularly after Silva's fine 17th-minute opener.

"From their goal until half-time it's the worst we've played," he told a news conference.

"Before then, it could've gone either way, a goal, but that doesn't matter now.

"We've just got to focus on Saturday, Norwich [City]. After that second half we've got something that we can believe in."

Solskjaer said his message to his players was clear after they trailed 3-0 at half-time and looked in danger of being thrashed.

"Pride is one word that you speak about at half-time," he said.

"Make sure you win the second half and you're in the tie and of course it's a difficult task that we've got in front of us.

"But that second half at least gave us something to hang onto."

Pep Guardiola remains wary of a Manchester United comeback in their EFL Cup semi-final despite Manchester City's 3-1 win at Old Trafford on Tuesday.

City were largely dominant as Bernardo Silva and Riyad Mahrez scored before an Andreas Pereira own goal in the first half.

Marcus Rashford struck in the second half for United, who will head to the Etihad Stadium for the second leg on January 29.

But Guardiola pointed to United's comeback against Paris Saint-Germain in last season's Champions League – when they recovered from a 2-0 first-leg home loss in the last 16 – as a warning to his team.

"I've played many times against United, not just here, but when I was in Munich and especially Barcelona, and two finals of the Champions League. Of course I have incredible respect for this club and its history," he told a news conference.

"This club helps this Premier League in England and in Europe, to make our game a better place to be. Of course it's an incredible stage to come, an incredible scenario, and to try to play good like we did in the last times we've came here is an honour.

"But that is not three points, that is not done. Last season they lost 2-0 to PSG and after they went to France and you know they qualified.

"Anything can happen in football and I know after what happened in the second half that they are a dangerous team. Hopefully now in front of our people, they can support us like Man United support their team, and again, qualify for the final."

After City dominated the first half, United grew into the game in the second and found a goal through Rashford.

Guardiola was pleased with his side's opening 45 minutes, while praising United's response.

"We played good in the first half, we played really good. In the second half they changed to a diamond [formation] and we struggled more to press and they found [space] behind our holding midfielders," he said.

"[Mason] Greenwood, we could not press because they have two weapons up front with [Daniel] James and Rashford, so it's difficult for central defenders controlling these situations.

"And of course they have pride, they are United so that's normal the reaction they had in front of their people.

"I take note about what happened in the second half for the second leg in three weeks, but it's a good result tonight for us."

Interim manager Duncan Ferguson was "devastated" by Everton's penalty shootout defeat to Leicester City in the EFL Cup, but he believes there is potential to build on at Goodison Park.

Amid reports former Real Madrid and Bayern Munich coach Carlo Ancelotti is set to take charge, Everton fought back from two goals down against high-flying Leicester on Wednesday, only to lose 4-2 on spot-kicks.

James Maddison and Jonny Evans put Brendan Rodgers' side in control by half-time, but Tom Davies' volley paved the way for Leighton Baines to force penalties with a stunning stoppage-time equaliser.

Jamie Vardy scored the decisive spot-kick, however, sending Leicester through to their first EFL Cup semi-final since 1999-2000.

Ferguson was left to rue a slack first half, but he believes his successor - seemingly Ancelotti - has the basis of a promising squad.

"I am devastated, and the players are, too," Ferguson told a news conference. "We were too passive in the first half, just not aggressive enough. We were much better in the second half but we've just come up short.

"It's difficult because it was practically the same team as the weekend, and we're down to the bare bones at the minute. But we'll pick ourselves up and go again for another massive game [against Arsenal] on Saturday.

"We have great potential. There is a great team spirit here, and there's something to build on. The players have given me every ounce of energy they have over the past three games - and I thank them for that.

"I've loved every moment of this. The first two results help you, and I'm proud tonight about the second-half performance. But for the fans, not getting to the semi-final, I'm devastated."

Ferguson caused some controversy on Sunday when he took off Moise Kean just 19 minutes after the former Juventus youngster had come on as a substitute in the 1-1 draw at Manchester United.

Kean was introduced at half-time on Wednesday and looked sharp as Everton rallied, with an excellent cross for Dominic Calvert-Lewin, who headed over, a highlight of the 19-year-old's display.

"I spoke to him [before the game] so there's no problems at all," Ferguson said of Kean. "I thought he did well tonight. It was a good reaction, but we go again for Saturday."

Leicester boss Rodgers, meanwhile, has now progressed in 29 successive cup matches across spells with Liverpool, Celtic and the Foxes, but he praised his counterpart for his impact since Marco Silva's dismissal.

"I think what you've seen in these last few games is that [Ferguson] has given the crowd and the team real spirit," Rodgers said.

"He was great on the touchline. When I saw him from the outside, he's a true Evertonian, but he's also a very good coach."

Duncan Ferguson suffered his first defeat as Everton's interim manager as Leicester City booked their place in the EFL Cup semi-finals with a penalty shoot-out victory at Goodison Park.

Carlo Ancelotti is reportedly close to taking over at Everton, who had beat Chelsea and drawn with Manchester United under Ferguson, whose side fought back from 2-0 down to draw 2-2 in normal time to set up penalties.

After quickfire goals from James Maddison and Jonny Evans had put Leicester in control, Everton rallied through Tom Davies and Leighton Baines' stoppage-time stunner.

But Baines could not repeat his heroics from the spot as he, along with Cenk Tosun, failed to beat Kasper Schmeichel - the Premier League's leading scorer Jamie Vardy ensuring Leicester's place in the last four.

Rangers boss Steven Gerrard says his players and the assistant referee need to share responsibility for the 1-0 Scottish League Cup final defeat to Celtic on Sunday, but concedes officials need more help than they are getting.

Gerrard's side were comfortably the more dominant throughout, carving out a host of clear opportunities and then missing a penalty through Alfredo Morelos just moments after Christopher Jullien's goal for Celtic, who played much of the second half with 10 men.

Replays appeared to show Jullien in an offside position when he tucked home Ryan Christie's free-kick, leaving Gerrard frustrated the goal was not ruled out, with VAR not yet introduced to Scottish football.

"Finals are normally decided on big moments and the big moments haven't gone in our favour," he told a media conference.

"We conceded from a set-piece, which we shouldn't have given away. Once you concede it, you have to defend it better.

"There were three Celtic players standing in offside positions but unfortunately we play in a country where there is no VAR.

"I think it [VAR] has taken something away from the game, so I'd be a liar if I said I'm 100 per cent in favour of it.

"But one thing I do know is that the officials up here do need some support and help because there are too many things, not just for our club but across the board, that they maybe miss and need a bit of support on.

"I'm not the type of person who blames or look for excuses. The big moments have gone against us today; we are all responsible for that.

"But the reality is, at the top end of football, you expect the linesman to get one of them right from the three who were in an offside position."

Many were surprised to see Morelos take the crucial spot-kick ahead of regular taker James Tavernier, but Gerrard was quick to dismiss suggestions his captain passed up the opportunity to step forward.

"Alfredo was the nominated penalty taker," he explained. "It was nothing to do with James passing the buck or anything like that. I decided we needed to change that up.

"Unfortunately, we haven't taken our chance in that big moment. People will look back at that moment as the chance to swing the momentum of the whole game in our favour, although we were much the stronger team throughout the 90 minutes anyway."

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