Joe Root has been left out of England's squad for the Twenty20 International encounters with Australia, while Jason Roy will hope to prove his fitness to return in the ODI series.

Root has not played for his country in the shortest format since May 2019 and has been overlooked for the three-match T20 series, which starts at the Rose Bowl on Friday.

The Test captain has made an impressive start to the T20 Blast back in Yorkshire colours, having stated he has not given up on forcing his way back into squad for the T20 World Cup in India next year, but said he was realistic over his chances.

Root has been named in a 13-man squad for the ODI series, which follows the T20s, versus Aaron Finch's side at Old Trafford.

Roy will sit out the T20s due to a left side strain that has kept him out of the ongoing series against Pakistan, but will remain in the bio-secure bubble with a view to showing he can feature in the 50-over format.

Test players Jofra Archer, Jos Buttler, Sam Curran and Mark Wood are back in both squads, while Chris Woakes is set to play in the ODI series.

Ben Stokes remains absent after flying to New Zealand to be with his family, as his father Ged has brain cancer. Fellow all-rounder David Willey was overlooked for both squads despite being man of the series in the ODIs against Ireland. 

National selector Ed Smith, said: "These two series against Australia provide an exciting end to the summer. We have selected strong squads.

"We are also continuing to develop depth in preparation for the upcoming T20 World Cups."

 

England T20 squad: Eoin Morgan (captain), Moeen Ali, Jofra Archer, Jonny Bairstow, Tom Banton, Sam Billings, Jos Buttler, Sam Curran, Tom Curran, Joe Denly, Chris Jordan, Dawid Malan, Adil Rashid, Mark Wood.

Reserves: Liam Livingstone, Saqib Mahmood.

England ODI squad: Eoin Morgan (captain), Moeen Ali, Jofra Archer, Jonny Bairstow, Tom Banton, Sam Billings, Jos Buttler, Sam Curran, Tom Curran, Adil Rashid, Joe Root, Chris Woakes, Mark Wood.

Reserves: Joe Denly, Saqib Mahmood.

England captain Eoin Morgan expects batsman Jason Roy to be fit for the Twenty20 and ODI series against Australia next month.

It was confirmed on Thursday that Roy would miss the upcoming T20 series against Pakistan due to a side strain he sustained in practice this week.

Roy will remain with the England set-up while he recovers, and will undergo rehabilitation ahead of the Australia white-ball series, which starts on September 4 in Southampton.

Though he will be shorn of one of his big hitters at the top of the order, Morgan is confident Roy – who made only 25 runs across three ODI innings in the recent series against Ireland – will return in time to face Australia.

"Unfortunately he tweaked his side two days ago, and will be ruled out for the three games in order to give him time to prepare for both series against Australia," Morgan told a news conference.

"At the moment we don't anticipate it being anything serious but we want to give him every chance to be fit for Australia, both series - T20s and 50 overs.

"So we'll see how he progresses over the next three or four days and be able to report back then."

Despite Roy's injury, England have not yet called up an official replacement, with Morgan feeling there is enough quality cover within the squad already.

"At the moment, given that we have a lot of flexibility, particularly with our allrounders in Joe Denly and Moeen Ali, and the reserve batters in the squad, at the moment we don't feel a need to pull anybody in for tomorrow," he added.

Liam Livingstone, Tom Banton and Dawid Malan appear to be the likely candidates to battle it out to take Roy's place.

"Dawid in particular has really put together an early establishment of a career that, every time he's available, he's put himself forward as the next man, simply by weight of runs and the rate at which he scores them," Morgan said.

"[Banton] naturally is a top-order batter, but at a time where we have top-order batters in abundance and actually lack middle-order players, it's sometimes difficult to get him in in the position that is his strength.

"We know what he can achieve at the top of the order, along with a number of other guys who bat in the top five. And so hopefully if he gets a chance he can take it."

Jason Roy found his axing from the England team during last year's Ashes series "heartbreaking" but he remains determined to earn another crack at Test level.

Surrey batsman Roy was one of the stars of England's Cricket World Cup triumph on home soil, with a blistering semi-final 85 against Australia one of four fifties alongside a century in a competition he concluded with an average of 63.28.

Despite his lack of experience at the top of the order in red-ball cricket, those performances increased the clamour for Roy to open in the Ashes that followed in a congested English summer.

Faced with Australia's imposing pace attack, the 29-year-old endured an ordeal that was halted after a drop down to number four in the fourth Test defeat at Old Trafford failed to bring about a significant change in fortunes.

"I've worked very hard to try and crack Test cricket and for it to get taken away from me that quickly was heartbreaking," Roy told reporters, with his average of 13.75 against Australia meaning he was omitted from England's restorative victory in South Africa and the subsequently aborted trip to Sri Lanka.

"I'm going to be trying my hardest to get back into the side and prove myself. Scoring a weight of runs in white-ball cricket and then not being able to do that in Test cricket was upsetting, because I really felt like I could. I still feel like I can.

"Everyone wants to be a Test cricketer. I’ve been selected but I want to succeed."

Roy conceded the emotional swing from his World Cup high was a tough one to handle.

"The Ashes series was a very tough time," he added. "It was absolutely ridiculous — I've never felt so high and so low in such a short period.

"It brings back some strange emotions now even thinking back to it, but it is part of being a professional sportsman. You’ve got to overcome these sorts of bumps."

England batsman Jason Roy is eager to play matches behind closed doors in order to get international cricket back up and running.

Roy acknowledged he feels like a "pawn in the sporting world" amid the coronavirus pandemic and will not needlessly put himself at risk.

But once it is deemed safe to play matches, he is keen to do so even if it means the unusual prospect of international matches taking place without spectators present.

"I'm more than happy to play behind closed doors [in England]," Roy told reporters. 

"I just want to play some cricket, to be honest. For us to be able to go out and play some cricket would be an incredible feeling. 

"It feels weird. I feel like a kid again but I guess we are governed by the government. There are way bigger things going on.

"I won't be going to my bosses and saying, 'Put me in the front line'. I'll just get told what to do. I'm just a pawn in the sporting world.

"Everyone is missing sport, but safety comes first. If an individual wants to go on to the front line and put himself at risk, then good on him, but if somebody doesn't want to, I don't think they should be criticised. 

"I've got a huge amount of trust in the ECB. I think they will look at every single avenue and I'll probably have a chat with Morgs [limited-overs captain Eoin Morgan], see where his head's at and go with that.

"I'm going a bit stir crazy. I’ve got a bat and I’m just shadow-batting in the mirror – I’m looking pretty good! That’s all I can do apart from hitting a tennis ball against the wall here at home.

"I think all of the boys are on edge, waiting for the call - so we know if we've got a month's turnaround or six weeks to get in the net and hit some balls. The boys will be as ready as they can be."

Roy has experience of playing a recent competitive match behind closed doors.

He played in February's Pakistan Super League contest between Quetta Gladiators and Lahore Qalandars with no spectators present as COVID-19 was beginning to spread.

"There was no atmosphere - it was as simple as that," reflected Roy. "It was a very strange feeling.

"As a batsman I'm used to it being relatively quiet with the bowler running in - you learn to block out the crowd - but as soon as that ball is done you hear the crowd going absolutely berserk.

"Over there, when that was the case, it was just like dead silence - it was the strangest thing. You could hear your mate calling for ones and twos. 

"You don't have to work on body language. It was quite strange and quite hard to get up for but it was just something that we knew we had to deal with."

Jason Roy rued the "huge shame" of missing out on capitalising of the feel-good factor of England's Cricket World Cup triumph with the postponement of The Hundred but accepts it is the right decision.

The inaugural season of the men's 100-ball competition, comprising eight different franchises, was due to begin on July 17 with the women's version starting five days later.

However, a decision was taken by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) to put the launch campaign back to 2021 on Thursday due to the coronavirus pandemic.

With social-distancing rules and travel restrictions still in place, it was becoming increasingly unlikely that the world's top international talent would have been able to feature.

Roy, who was selected by the Oval Invincibles in the draft, said it is a decision that makes sense. 

"It's hugely disappointing but there are bigger things at stake to be honest. Obviously, there was a huge incentive for the ECB, it was a huge competition that they put a lot of money into but it's only right that it be delayed until next year," told reporters

"You want to best players coming over and at the moment they can't. Unfortunately that's just the way it is at the moment."

Roy was part of the England team that won a first World Cup in a dramatic Super Over victory against New Zealand last July.

The big-hitting opener is disappointed not to be able to build on the goodwill earned from that thrilling success on home soil.

"It is a shame. You saw the response to Sky showing the final on TV [earlier on during lockdown], everyone was watching it and we were getting great feedback again," he added.

"It was amazing to relive it with a few of the boys, we jumped on a Zoom call and watched the game, it was good fun. 

"It's a huge shame that we won't be able get out in front of a home crowd again, especially after all that. 

"But who knows what will happen towards the end of the season. There are bigger things at stake though."

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