The 2022 US PGA Championship will no longer be held at the Trump National Golf Club Bedminster.

The PGA of America announced on Sunday it had terminated its agreement to play the major at the course owned by United States president Donald Trump.

It comes just days after supporters of the president stormed the United States Capitol.

"The PGA of America Board of Directors voted tonight to exercise the right to terminate the agreement to play the 2022 PGA Championship at Trump Bedminster," PGA of America president Jim Richerson said in a statement.

"It has become clear that conducting the PGA Championship at Trump Bedminster would be detrimental to the PGA of America brand and would put at risk the PGA's ability to deliver our many programs and sustain the longevity of our mission," Richerson added in a video.

The decision to hold the tournament at the Trump National Golf Club Bedminster was made in 2014.

Cameron Smith feels he could win a couple of Masters titles if he replicates his history-making Augusta performance.

Smith became the first player in Masters history to card all four rounds in the 60s at the major tournament after going 67-68-69-69, but he still finished runner-up on Sunday.

The unheralded Australian ended the rescheduled event 15 under, level with Sung-jae Im, but still five strokes adrift of record-breaking champion Dustin Johnson in Georgia.

It was Smith's best major performance, having tied for fourth at the 2015 U.S. Open.

After achieving a first in The Masters' 84 years, Smith told reporters: "I had no idea starting today that I needed to do that. That's really cool. 

"I honestly can't believe it, but just got to put it down ‑‑ myself, just got to put it down to just scrambling and digging deep. There were a few times throughout week where I could have let it slip away, and it didn't."

Reflecting on his bittersweet display, Smith – winner of two PGA Tour titles and as many on the European Tour – added: "It would have been cool to do that and win. I was actually saying before, you know, I'd take 15‑under around here the rest of my career and I might win a couple. 

"It's just the way it is. I felt as though I didn't quite have my longest stuff, like I said, this week, but my scrambling was what kept me in it."

"I felt like I got away with a lot this week, a bit of skewwhiff shots into the green, something I might need to tidy up if we're coming back here and it's firm and fast," continued the 27-year-old, who was tied for fifth at the 2018 Masters.

"But I love the place. I want to win here really badly, and I feel like it brings the best out of my game."

Dustin Johnson admitted his emotions threatened to get the better of him as he closed in on a record-breaking win at the 2020 Masters.

The world number one claimed the famous green jacket for the first time after finishing five strokes clear on an historic 20-under-par - the first time any player has reached that mark at Augusta.

It was the 36-year-old's second major triumph and the first since his 2016 victory at the U.S. Open, but he said this was the tournament he always dreamed of winning.

As he and his caddie, younger brother Austin Johnson, closed out a final round of four under, he found it tough to keep his emotions in check as he thought ahead to receiving the iconic blazer from 2019 champion Tiger Woods.

"It's always tough to get it done in a major, no matter how good you're playing, it's hard," he said. "I was nervous all day; I could feel it. The Masters for me is the biggest, the one I wanted to win the most. I'm proud of the way I handled myself and the way I finished off the tournament.

"Honestly, it still feels like a dream. As a kid, dreaming about winning the Masters, having Tiger put the green jacket on you, it still seems like it's a dream. I'm here; what a great feeling it is. I couldn't be more excited.

"It's an unbelievable feeling, to experience that with my brother. It's a big help to have him here on my bag, I wouldn't want anyone else there. To share all these memories and moments with him is incredible. I had a jam a little bit on the 18th, he was tearing it up, it made me tear up – I still got to finish this off, I can't be crying! I'll remember this for the rest of my life.

"It's an incredible feeling. I've played unbelievable golf all week. The conditions of the course definitely helped the scoring a little bit. I played really well, today felt really difficult, the wind was very tricky. To have the scoring record, shooting 20 under is a great honour. I'm so excited, it's hard to even talk."

Woods hailed the achievement of a man he says has brought a new level of "athleticism" to golf.

"He's an amazing athlete," Woods said. "He's one of the first guys to ever bring athleticism to our sport.

"DJ has just an amazing ability to stay calm in tough moments, and in order to win this event, and we all know as past champions how hard it is, the emotions we have to deal with out there.  There's no one more suited to that, I think, than DJ."

Tiger Woods imploded in remarkable fashion on the 12th hole at Augusta on Sunday, but the five-time Masters champion was proud of his response to the setback. 

Woods – who triumphed at Augusta in 2019 – fell apart on the par-three hole at Rae's Creek during his final round, shooting a 10. 

The 15-time major winner's tee shot bounced back into the water and a wedge from the resultant drop also found the drink. 

Woods' then landed his next shot into a bunker, before his subsequent attempt out of the sand sailed over the green and back into the water for a third time. 

He regained his composure to finish with two putts, though the damage was already done as he slipped to four over par.

However, Woods hit back to shoot five birdies over his last six holes, ensuring he ended his tournament by signing for a score of 76, leaving him at one under. 

"That's part of our sport," Woods told reporters. "This sport is awfully lonely sometimes.  

"You have to fight it. No one is going to bring you off the mound or call in a sub. You have to fight through it.  

"That's what makes this game so unique and so difficult mentally. We've all been there, unfortunately. I've been there and you just have to turn around and figure out the next shot, and I was able to do that coming home."

Explaining his error-strewn effort on the 12th, Woods added: "Well, I committed to the wrong wind. 

"The wind was off the right for the first two guys, and then when I stepped up there, it switched to howling off the left, and the flag on 11 was howling off the left.  

"I didn't commit to the wind, and I also got ahead of it and pushed it, too, because I thought the wind would come more off the right and it was off the left, and that just started the problem from there. 

"From there I hit a lot more shots and had a lot more experiences there in Rae's Creek, and then this is unlike any other sport in which you're so alone out there and you have to figure it out and you have to fight and no one is going to pull you off the bump and you just have to figure it out." 

Woods finished 19 strokes behind winner Dustin Johnson, who capped a supreme performance with a fourth-round 68 to finish on 20 under, the first player to reach that number in Masters history. 

World number one Dustin Johnson rounded off a dominant week at Augusta National by claiming his maiden Masters crown.  

Johnson finished on a record-breaking 20-under for the tournament, five strokes clear of nearest rivals Cameron Smith and Sungjae Im. 

The 36-year-old took some time to relocate the imperious form he displayed during Saturday's bogey-free 65, dropping shots at four and five.  

That wobble offered a reminder that Johnson had failed to convert on the previous four occasions he had held a 54-hole lead at a major.  

However, the 2016 U.S. Open winner stormed clear on the back nine, with an immaculate wedge to six feet on 15 setting up a third consecutive birdie - a successful putt that made him the first player in Masters history to reach 20-under.

Dustin Johnson has another chance to turn a 54-hole lead into a major title ahead of the final round of the Masters.

The world number one carded a seven-under 65 at Augusta on Saturday to open up a four-stroke lead and be well-placed for a second major crown.

The 54-hole lead is the fifth of Johnson's major career, and he has failed to convert any of the previous four into victories.

Brooks Koepka took a jab at Johnson's major total during the US PGA Championship earlier this year. Johnson took a one-stroke lead into the final round at TPC Harding Park, before finishing tied for second behind Collin Morikawa.

Johnson has dominated on the PGA Tour since that event, winning the Northern Trust before four straight top-six finishes prior to the Masters.

But can the 23-time winner on the Tour turn another 54-hole lead into a second major title?

Johnson previously led after the third round at three U.S. Opens (2010, 2015 and 2018) and this year's US PGA. Aside from his implosion at Pebble Beach a decade ago, he finished in the top three at the other three.

The 2010 U.S. Open was the only other time in his career that Johnson has led by three shots or more heading into the final round of a major, but will the 2020 Masters be a different story?

2010 U.S. Open

It fell apart quickly for Johnson 10 years ago. A three-stroke lead evaporated on the back of a triple bogey at the second hole and double bogey at the third, and he finished with six more bogeys in his round as Graeme McDowell went on to win by one. Johnson finished tied for eighth at five over. It represented the largest lead lost by a 54-hole leader at the U.S. Open since 2005, when Retief Goosen gave up a three-shot lead, and Michael Campbell capitalised.

2015 U.S. Open

Johnson entered the final round sharing a three-shot lead with Jordan Spieth, Jason Day and Branden Grace. The big-hitting Johnson went to the final green with a chance to win his first major, facing a 12-foot eagle putt for victory. But he incredibly three-putted, handing Spieth the title. It was his ninth top-10 finish in 25 major starts.

2018 U.S. Open

At this stage already a U.S. Open champion, Johnson found himself in a familiar position after three rounds – in a four-way tie for the lead, this time alongside Koepka, Tony Finau and Daniel Berger. But Koepka's final-round 68 proved too good at Shinnecock Hills, Johnson's 70 enough for third place, behind the charging Tommy Fleetwood (63).

2020 US PGA Championship

A four-time major winner, Koepka questioned Johnson's tally before the final round in San Francisco, where the latter held a one-stroke lead. But Morikawa stole the show in the final round with a stunning six-under 64. It marked Johnson's fifth runner-up finish in a major and he became the first player to finish second at the US PGA in consecutive years since Jack Nicklaus (1964-65).

Tiger Woods has given no consideration to the emotions that may come with placing the green jacket on a new Masters champion on Sunday as his focus was purely on attempting to stay in contention in round three.

Last year, Woods ended an 11-year wait for a 15th major title with a stunning triumph at Augusta National, his fifth Masters win and one shy of Jack Nicklaus' overall record.

An even-par 72 on Saturday means he is 11 strokes off leader Dustin Johnson, whose score of 16 under matches the 54-hole record set by Jordan Spieth in 2015.

Johnson is four shots clear at the top of the leaderboard and whether Woods is awarding his fellow American a green jacket or someone else in contention, he has not thought about how he will feel doing so. 

"I have not. Tuesday [the Champions Dinner] was a long, tough day for me, but I have not thought about tomorrow yet," Woods told a news conference following Saturday's round. 

"I was focused on trying to get myself in contention going into tomorrow.

"I just found out that the tee times are going to be a bit early tomorrow and going off two tees, so I didn't know what that bracket was going to be.

"I don't know exactly what position I'm in. I certainly will be part of the early part of the split and get after it tomorrow. We'll see how emotional it'll be after tomorrow's round."

While Johnson hunts a maiden Masters victory, this year marked the 25th anniversary of Woods' first appearance at the major, as an amateur in April 1995.

With the 2020 tournament pushed back to November due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the course has proven unpredictable for many seasoned competitors, including Woods, who stated earlier in the week that previous champions would be favoured once the ground firmed up.

"Well, it got a little bit faster, yes, but the putts just still aren't quite breaking," said Woods, who also said he was dealing with back pain during his third round.

"Some of the downhill putts are starting to move a little bit, but the uphill putts – we normally say that everything breaks towards Rae's Creek, and the greens can get a little touch grainy. 

"That's definitely been the case this week, just because they've been a little bit longer."

Rory McIlroy believes he has left himself too much to do to end his wait for Masters glory despite an impressive 67 in the third round. 

The four-time major winner, who is chasing the green jacket at Augusta to complete the set, signed for a five-under score to move to eight under overall. 

But as Dustin Johnson pulled clear - 14 under when McIlroy finished, which soon became 15 under - the Northern Irishman acknowledged his hopes may have disappeared with his opening effort of 75. 

"If he just plays his game, he's going to get to at least 16. Eight shots," McIlroy said after his round. 

"I'm being a realist here; I just need to go out there tomorrow and shoot a good one and see where it puts me. I have zero thoughts about winning this golf tournament right now." 

His plan instead? "Just try to play a good round of golf," he said. 

"Just try to do the same thing I've done the last couple of days, go out and try to hit every fairway, try to hit every green, try to make a birdie on every hole if you can. 

"You're just trying to shoot the best possible score. That's the way to win golf tournaments, just keep doing that day after day. That's what I'm going to try to do. 

"As I said, I think I've left myself too far back after the bad first day, but I'll go and give it a good effort tomorrow and see where that leaves me."

McIlroy conceded he had been "tentative" early in the week and expected he would come to regret his poor start to the tournament. 

"I think 11 under for the last two days speaks for itself," he said. "The good golf was in there, I just didn't allow myself to play that way on the first 18 holes. 

"This course can do that. This course can make you a little bit careful and a little bit tentative at times. 

"I've always said I play my best golf when I'm trusting and freer. I've been a lot freer over the last 36 holes. 

"I try to view everything as a learning experience, but I'll look back at that and rue some of the shots that I hit and some of the thought-processes I had and just try to learn from it and be better the next time." 

The iconic Georgia course has repeatedly proven McIlroy's undoing, but he recognises it should not have been such a problem. 

He said: "The Masters and Augusta National have some of the coolest traditions in our game. Of course, you want to be a part of that for the rest of your life if you can. 

"Winning the Masters would be cool, winning the grand slam would be cool, and there's a lot of great things that come along with that. 

"But at the end of the day, you have to try to simplify it as much as you can. 

"It's just a golf tournament, and you're playing against guys you see every week. It shouldn't be that different."

Dustin Johnson felt he was "on a good roll" heading into the second round of the Masters on Friday and so it initially proved.

The world number one had been required to turn out early in the morning to finish his first 18 holes and improved from three under through nine to seven under at the finish, seizing a share of the lead with Paul Casey and Dylan Frittelli.

He finished with three birdies across the final four holes of the first round and had time only for a brief pause before heading back out to start again.

"To continue to play is definitely a nice advantage," he said. "Obviously we know how the golf course is playing. We've already played nine holes this morning."

Sure enough, after making par as he teed off once more from the 10th, Johnson rattled off three straight birdies to build a three-stroke lead at 10 under.

Having already beaten his best ever score at Augusta over the opening 18 holes, further improvement still was in Johnson's sights in a low-scoring week.

But then the top-ranked star, aiming to become the first world number one to win the Masters since Tiger Woods in 2002, started to stutter.

A bogey at 14 was followed by a trip into the water on the next hole.

Johnson reached the turn back at eight under and had company once again, Im Sung-jae joining the leader.

Justin Thomas briefly had a slice of first place, too, until he double-bogeyed the first – his 10th – after hitting a tree to fall back.

Frittelli was moving in the wrong direction, one over through nine, but Brooks Koepka sustained the form he found late in the first to move to five under.

Also on the climb in Johnson's group was Rory McIlroy, whose Masters hopes had again looked remote as he completed 18 holes in 75.

McIlroy found birdies at 10, 12, 15 and 17 to move into the red for the first time this week, then letting out a laugh as he nailed his tee shot at the 18th, although he had to settle for making the turn bogey-free at one under.

Dustin Johnson and Dylan Frittelli joined Paul Casey in a share of the lead at the Masters as the first round belatedly concluded on Friday.

Weather delays meant half of the field could not play 18 holes on Thursday, forcing several big names to return early before a swift turnaround.

World number one Johnson could carry some momentum into his second round after birdieing three of the final four holes to match Casey's seven-under 65.

Johnson carded his best round at Augusta, beating his previous low of 67 after resuming at three under through nine.

That still might not have been enough for the co-lead had Frittelli put away his birdie putt at the ninth, his final hole, for first place outright.

Frittelli had missed the cut in his only previous Masters appearance but built on an impressive Thursday - which included an eagle-birdie-birdie-birdie run from the 13th - to hold an 18-hole joint-lead for the first time on the PGA Tour.

Justin Thomas was a stroke back, having not quite maintained the rampant form that took him to five under through 10 overnight.

Also in touch were a pair of veteran former champions in Bernhard Langer and Phil Mickelson, the former on four under with the latter a shot further back.

Even when the 63-year-old Langer appeared to see his round heading off the rails at the seventh, he brilliantly limited the damage to a bogey and followed up with a birdie.

It was the German's first opening round in the 60s at Augusta since 1993, when he won the second of his two titles, and he is on course to become the oldest player to make the cut in Masters history.

Mickelson looked to be finishing his first round on a roll until a bizarre final hole saw a great tee shot followed by a second into the bunker, then landing within four feet before missing a par putt.

Brooks Koepka could end on a high, however, as he followed favourite Bryson DeChambeau in recovering from a slow start to make 70, finishing eagle-birdie-par-birdie.

There was no such change in fortunes for a struggling Rory McIlroy.

Chasing that elusive green jacket and a clean sweep of majors, the Northern Irishman started the day at even par but saw his round quickly fall apart with bogeys at 10, 13 and 14.

Even a birdie at 15 was followed by a miserable tee shot into the water at 16, which forced him to rescue bogey impressively, carding a three-over 75 and in real danger of missing the cut.

Paul Casey insisted the Masters "still has a buzz to it" despite no fans being in attendance as he took the lead on Thursday.

The Englishman carded a seven-under 65 at a weather-hit Augusta to take a two-stroke lead as the first round was suspended due to darkness.

Casey's 65 tied his lowest career score at a major as he led Webb Simpson and Xander Schauffele.

While no fans are in attendance in Georgia due to the coronavirus pandemic, Casey said he could still feel the buzz at the Masters.

"This is something I've looked forward to. I was vocal earlier in the year at Harding Park about not enjoying golf in a pandemic," he told a news conference.

"I'm acutely aware I'm in a very fortuitous position. I still get to be a professional golfer and play championship golf, but I didn't know how the fan-less experience would be. And so far, I've not enjoyed it, and I've lacked I felt like the lack of energy for me. I've had nothing or very little to draw from being out playing tournament golf. 

"The Masters, though, this week, it still has a buzz to it. There's an energy and a little bit of a vibe. Yes, it's clearly a lot less than what we are used to, but there's something about this place that is still, I felt excited to be here."

Casey is again well-placed to be in contention, having finished as runner-up at the US PGA Championship earlier this year for his 10th top-10 result at a major.

The 43-year-old said the history of the Masters made the tournament special.

"The golf course itself is part of it. The history of this championship, this tournament. So many people like myself are just excited to play this. You know, this is a treat," Casey said. 

"It always has been and always will be a real treat. There's many great golfers who are not here this week because they are not high enough in the rankings or how they didn't qualify, and they are envious of every single player in the field. So for me, it's not lost on me."

Paul Casey will carry a two-stroke lead into Friday at the Masters as Tiger Woods made an impressive start to his title defence at a rain-hit Augusta.

Casey opened with a seven-under 65 in Georgia on Thursday, but the first round was initially delayed and then suspended for almost three hours due to inclement weather.

The Englishman, who was runner-up at the US PGA Championship earlier this year for his 10th top-10 finish at a major, produced a bogey-free round that included an eagle and five birdies.

Casey sat two strokes clear of American duo Webb Simpson and Xander Schauffele, who opened with 67s, when play was suspended for the day due to darkness with 44 players yet to get through 18 holes.

It continued Simpson's fine form, having finished in the top 20 in each of his past six starts on the PGA Tour.

But all eyes were on Woods, who started his title defence with a four-under 68.

Having sensationally won his 15th major at the Masters last year, Woods entered the tournament with just one top-10 finish in 2020 and that came at the Farmers Insurance Open in January.

However, the American – starting on the back nine – made three birdies in four holes from the 13th and picked up a shot at the first during a bogey-free first round.

A five-time Masters winner, Woods' 68 tied his lowest first-round score at the tournament and was his first bogey-free round in a major since the 2009 US PGA Championship.

Woods' round left him in an eight-way tie for fourth, with Hideki Matsuyama, Lee Westwood, Louis Oosthuizen and Patrick Reed alongside him and having completed their rounds.

But Adam Scott (through 10), Justin Thomas (through nine) and Dylan Frittelli (through eight) were all flying and at four under before play was suspended.

Scott, the 2013 Masters champion, made four birdies on the front nine, while Thomas and Frittelli made more mixed starts.

World number one Dustin Johnson (through eight) and Jon Rahm (69) were among a group at three under alongside Rickie Fowler (through 11) and Matthew Wolff (through 10).

U.S. Open champion Bryson DeChambeau recovered from a double bogey at the 13th hole to post a two-under 70 and sit in a tie for 19th, a position he is joined in by Jason Day (70) and Justin Rose (through eight) among others.

Rory McIlroy struggled to get much going, reaching even par halfway through his round, while Brooks Koepka was one over through nine.

Jordan Spieth, the 2015 winner, showed no signs of turning his poor form around, opening with a 74.

Adam Scott believes the absence of fans will be the biggest difference at the Masters beginning this week.

No fans will be in attendance at Augusta, where the Masters begin on Thursday after being rescheduled from April due to the coronavirus pandemic.

While conditions are also set to be different – and rain is forecast throughout the major – Scott, the 2013 Masters champion, said playing without fans was undoubtedly the biggest factor.

"I think a lot's different about the year, but this week and the Masters being played in these circumstances, there's no doubt the missing galleries is going to be the biggest difference," the Australian told a news conference. 

"I've played two major championships since we've come back from this COVID break, and it couldn't be more different playing major championship golf without the spectators out there and the crowds and the atmosphere, and that is a huge difference.

"The things that will be the same is it still means the same to us all, and maybe even more so because we return to Augusta National every year. 

"Everything that the club does to make this a special event for everybody who gets to watch it, whether that's on TV, the patrons who come to the grounds or the players, it's an incredible experience, and that is why it means so much to us all. That will be the same.

"We'll be missing one element, but it is a huge element to the experience of playing the Masters."

Scott won the Genesis Invitational in February, but the world number 15 is yet to hit top form since returning to action after the coronavirus-enforced break.

In the past five events, Scott's best finish was a tie for 22nd at the US PGA Championship, while he also tested positive for COVID-19 last month.

"I think it's been very challenging for me personally, and I'm not going to sit here and complain about how difficult it's been," Scott said.

"I was in good form back then in the spring, and because of all the circumstances, it's really affected my preparation and my practice, and many things since returning. 

"I think all the guys who are based internationally and not based here in the United States would probably feel similar. It's not easy moving around at the moment, and lots of different restrictions depending where you are and where you're moving to. But coming back here this week, since testing positive, last week wasn't too bad.

"There was a lot of good stuff in there, and hopefully the work that I have done and been able to do the last couple of months will accumulate and I'll be able to finish the year with a bang here this week. Certainly my form hasn't been as good since, but everything's been very inconsistent."

Three-time Masters champion Nick Faldo believes playing Augusta this week will be no easier for the absence of patrons but the winning feeling on Sunday will be dampened.

A unique November Masters begins without spectators on Thursday, with the tournament moved from its usual April date due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Faldo, who won at Augusta in 1989, 1990 and 1996, believes the players will suffer as a result of fans being kept away.

And the six-time major winner foresees an awkward celebration for this year's victor, completely out of keeping with the scenes in 2019 as Tiger Woods ended an 11-year wait for one of golf's top prizes.

"It's going to be very different," Faldo said. "You're going to celebrate winning by turning, looking at your caddy and just giving a whatever, half high-five.

"There won't be any adrenaline like Tiger showed last year.

"It's probably quite sad for some guys. You win a tournament and go, 'Hi, thanks', and you get a little golf clap. It will hurt a little bit, because it's just not the same.

"The famous walk, coming up the 18th; I can promise you, the goosebumps. It's all unfortunately going to be less, it has to be less. It's one of the most wonderful walks coming down the 18th at a major to win.

"The Masters is so special because the whole green is engulfed with patrons, the famous scoreboards. It's all going to be very quiet.

"The good thing is there will still be a green jacket waiting at Butler Cabin. It will feel good by then, but it has to feel very different on the golf course."

Predicting the empty course could get under the skin of some players, Faldo added: "To play the Masters without even having any patron ropes lining any of the fairways is going to be a pretty weird feeling, a weird look.

"It's just you, just the golfers, so I think, in a way, it can actually increase the intensity or the pressure. It's just you coping with everything.

"Some players are [usually] able to reflect their emotion with the fans, with the patrons, a smile, a wink, a funny face, a reaction off a good shot, a great shot, a poor shot.

"Now it's all down to you, you and your caddy. That could wind some of them up as well.

"With no patrons around, people think it's easier. But at the Masters, playing the second nine for a green jacket, it will still have incredible intensity. Just you and your caddy.

"You'll probably be able to hear your own heartbeat, you'll certainly be able to feel it. It will be so silent, just you dealing with everything."

Sebastian Munoz set the early pace at the Zozo Championship after earning a one-stroke lead in the opening round, while defending champion Tiger Woods struggled on his return to the PGA Tour.

Colombian golfer Munoz carded an eight-under-par 64 to top the leaderboard in Thousand Oaks, where the tournament is taking place after being relocated from Japan due to the coronavirus pandemic and travel restrictions.

Munoz – eyeing his second Tour title – holed two eagles, eight birdies, a double bogey and two bogeys at Sherwood Country Club.

The 27-year-old recorded his second eagle of the day on the par-five 16th, holing out from 51 yards to mark the third instance in his Tour career with two eagles in a single round.

England's Tyrrell Hatton and American star Justin Thomas – who ended the day eagle-birdie-birdie – are a shot off the pace heading into Friday's second round, while Brian Harman, Lanto Griffin, Kevin Kisner, Harris English and Dylan Frittelli are stroke further back at six under.

World number two Jon Rahm and Jason Day were among the players to post first-round 68s in a field missing top-ranked golfer Dustin Johnson and Adam Scott due to positive coronavirus cases.

After claiming his maiden Tour title via last week's CJ Cup at Shadow Creek, Jason Kokrak shot a three-under-par 69 to be tied for 26th alongside the likes of Xander Schauffele and Matthew Wolff.

Searching for his first victory since 2017, former world number one Jordan Spieth opened with a 70, just like 2018 Masters champion Patrick Reed.

Rory McIlroy – a four-time major champion – recorded a one-over-par 73, a shot worse off than Phil Mickelson.

As for Woods, his title defence and bid for a record-breaking 83rd Tour crown started with a forgettable four-over-par 76 that left him 12 strokes behind Munoz.

Making just his eighth start of 2020 and playing for the first time since missing the U.S. Open cut ahead of next month's Masters defence, Woods played three par-five holes over par in the same round for the first time in his illustrious career.

Woods carded a three-over 39 on the back nine, which included a double bogey and two bogeys to go with a solitary birdie.

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