England wicketkeeper-batsman Jos Buttler is a doubt for the second Test against New Zealand after suffering a back spasm.

Buttler sustained the injury in training and could miss the final match of the series against the Black Caps at Seddon Park, which starts on Friday.

Ollie Pope will take the gloves if Buttler is ruled out in Hamilton, where the tourists need a victory to salvage a 1-1 draw after they were hammered by an innings and 65 runs in Mount Maunganui.

England captain Joe Root said: "Jos has tweaked his back in the gym. We'll have to find out a little bit more information on that throughout today and see where he's at."

Root suggested England could select an extra bowler if Buttler is unable to play.

"There's a number of different combinations we could go with and I think a lot of that will rely on the surface," the batsman added.

"Trying to find the best combination, which would take 20 wickets, and then balancing that in terms of getting the batting where we want it to be. It could be an allrounder, we'll see."

Hamilton-born all-rounder Daryl Mitchell will make his Test debut for New Zealand in place of Colin de Grandhomme, who suffered an abdominal tear.

Daryl Mitchell will make his Test debut when New Zealand face England in Hamilton, beginning on Friday.

Mitchell, 28, replaces Colin de Grandhomme (abdominal muscle) for the Black Caps, who claimed a resounding victory in the first Test.

New Zealand batsman Ross Taylor confirmed Mitchell, who was born in Hamilton, would play.

"Daryl Mitchell is making his debut. It's obviously an exciting time for him," he told a news conference on Thursday.

"Colin de Grandhomme is some big shoes to fill, but he's had some experience at Twenty20 level and obviously had a very good campaign in the first-class scene.

"I'm looking forward to seeing how he goes."

Mitchell has played nine T20s for New Zealand, making 97 runs at an average of 16.16 and taking five wickets at 17.80.

New Zealand will also be without Trent Boult (rib) in what is the second and final Test of the series.

Rahkeem Cornwall has downplayed the idea that there was a magical formula for his performance on the first day of a one-off Test match against Afghanistan in Lucknow, India.

Afghanistan failed to capitalise on an encouraging start to the inaugural Test against West Indies as spinner Rahkeem Cornwall took seven wickets on day one.

Cornwall claimed magnificent figures of 7-75 in only his second international as Afghanistan were bowled out for 187 at the Ekana Cricket Stadium in Lucknow, having been 84-1 at one stage.

The Windies recovered from the loss of two early wickets in reply, closing on 68-2 with John Campbell and Shamarh Brooks the unbeaten batsmen.

Ibrahim Zadran (17) struck three boundaries before being caught in Cornwall's second over by Jason Holder at leg slip following a successful appeal that left the batsman seething after the Windies won the toss.

Ihsanullah (24) and Javed Ahmadi (39) were going along well before the latter sent an over-confident drive off Jomel Warrican straight to Brooks.

Ihsanullah then edged to Shai Hope as Cornwall sparked a sudden collapse, leaving Afghanistan in the mire on 111-7 after losing six wickets for just 27 runs.

Debutant Amir Hamza (34) made a start before Cornwall struck twice more in quick succession, Hamza edging to Shane Dowrich and Warrican catching Yamin Ahmadzai (18) at long-off.

Cornwall's first-innings figures were the best by a West Indies spinner since Jack Noriega's 9-95 back in 1971.

Hamza trapped Kraigg Brathwaite (11) lbw and Rashid Khan led the celebrations when Hope fell for the loss of just seven, leaving the Windies 34-2 and feeling some early pressure in their first innings.

However, Campbell (30) and Brooks (19) steadied the ship with seven boundaries between them and will look to press on when they resume on Thursday.

Joe Root has the support of everyone in the England dressing room when it comes to his Test captaincy, Ben Stokes has insisted.

Questions over Root's position have resurfaced in the wake of the chastening defeat to New Zealand in the first Test at Mount Maunganui on Monday.

England were beaten by an innings and 65 runs, with Root contributing just 13 as he dropped out of the top 10 of the ICC's Test batting rankings.

Stokes, however, says there is no better candidate for the role and believes pinning the blame for England's struggles on the captain alone is unfair.

"Joe knows that he's got the backing of everybody in the changing room: players, backroom staff and management," said the all-rounder, according to Cricinfo. "That's the main thing that counts for us as players in a very tightknit group. He knows that everybody in that changing room 100 per cent backs him, as I do.

"The pressures of being England Test captain is huge. It can be one of the most criticised jobs in England at times. And sometimes that criticism is unfair, I would say. There are 11 guys that contribute to a win or loss. It doesn't all fall on the captain.

"We put our hands up as players when we don't perform. But, unfortunately, Joe cops most of that [criticism]. But as a playing group, we stick together, and we hold our hands up together as well.

"He's fine. He's Joe Root. He is England captain and there's no one else to do it."

The opening Test was marred by racist abuse that England bowler Jofra Archer revealed he suffered from a spectator.

New Zealand Cricket (NZC) launched an investigation and captain Kane Williamson promised to apologise in person after Archer said he heard racist insults from a member of the crowd.

Stokes, who has New Zealand and Maori heritage, described the incident as "pretty horrific" but said the country was better represented by those who offered their support towards Archer.

"I'm obviously very proud of my heritage and where I'm from," Stokes said. "I'll always respect that. The tattoo on my arm just signifies where the family comes from.

"Coming back to New Zealand, it's not just a cricket tour for me. It's also a great time to be able to catch up with family that I don't get to see that often. I came out a week before the Test guys to stay with my mum and dad, which was awesome. I got to see brothers, sisters, cousins and everything like that. Every time I manage to come back it's really good.

"It wasn't a nice way to end the Test match and it's a shame because that doesn't represent what New Zealand is about as a country whatsoever. New Zealand is more accurately represented by how much support Jofra has had, not just from the New Zealand cricket team, but New Zealand in general after that incident.

"That's the main thing for us now: making Jofra aware that we've got his back. It was a pretty horrific incident and something that shouldn't happen in sport or in the world in general in 2019."

England paceman Jofra Archer described the racist abuse he suffered in the Test series opener against New Zealand as "a real shame".

Archer was targeted by a fan during England's heavy loss to New Zealand in the first Test in Mount Maunganui.

The 24-year-old is set to be swiftly back in action, with the second Test starting in Hamilton on Friday.

"The first thing I want to say about what happened towards the end of the Test at Mount Maunganui is that I'm over it," Archer told the Daily Mail.

"I've left what happened at the ground and I've moved on. I should also say it was just one person who was shouting stuff.

"But I found the incident a real shame. When you come to another country, you half expect fans to have a go at your cricket. If someone wants to shout at me and tell me I'm bowling badly, that's fine. I may not agree but it's fine. It's part of the experience of being a touring cricketer.

"To hear racism, though – that's another matter. There is no time or place for it in any walk of life, let alone cricket. It's just not called for."

Archer, who finished with disappointing figures of 1-107 in an innings defeat in the series opener, is eager for England to bounce back in the second Test.

"I don't want to go into the details of what was said but I know what I heard," he said. "I thought members of the crowd around the guy might have pulled him up because I could hear him from the pitch as I was walking off."

He added: "Now my only goal is to make sure we finish this series on a high because we were all disappointed with the result in the first Test."

New Zealand have been dealt a double blow ahead of the second Test against England with Trent Boult and Colin de Grandhomme ruled out.

Boult will miss the Test, starting in Hamilton on Friday, due to a strained muscle overlying his ribs on his right side.

De Grandhomme has a torn lower left abdominal muscle, New Zealand Cricket (NZC) confirmed in a statement on Wednesday.

"Both players will remain at home to rest and begin rehabilitation ahead of the Black Caps' departure for Australia on December 7," the statement read.

Boult finished with match figures of 1-103 and De Grandhomme 3-56 in New Zealand's comprehensive win in the first Test.

De Grandhomme also made a handy 65 with the bat as the Black Caps claimed victory by an innings and 65 runs.

All-rounder Daryl Mitchell has earned his maiden Test call-up, while Lockie Ferguson and Todd Astle have rejoined the squad.

England head coach Chris Silverwood will return home following day two of the second Test against New Zealand due to a family bereavement.

Assistant coaches Graham Thorpe and Paul Collingwood will assume responsibility of team affairs along with captain Joe Root for the remainder of the tour in the absence of Silverwood.

Silverwood, who replaced Trevor Bayliss last month, will fly back to his homeland following the close of play at Seddon Park on Saturday.

The tourists were thrashed by an innings and 65 runs in their first Test of Silverwood's reign at Mount Maunganui, so they must win in Hamilton to draw the series.

Ashley Giles, managing director of England men's cricket, has given his backing to Root after he failed twice with the bat in the crushing loss at Bay Oval and his captaincy was called into question.

Giles said: "Joe is our captain and he takes us forward. The stats would say the captaincy has affected his batting. You can't hide from that.

"We've got to work with him to make sure his game is in the best shape and he's got time to work on it away from the pressures of captaincy.

"We want to help him get back to averaging 50-plus and if he's doing that we are going to win games of Test cricket. I am very confident that [the burden] on Joe has changed and Chris is picking up a lot of the slack.

"I feel their relationship is going very well. There is a renewed focus on Test cricket and there are some young players in this team. We are going to make mistakes.

"But it's important that while we have a long-term vision in mind, we are looking at the short-term measures and reflecting and reviewing: do we need to change; how do we get better?

"We can't just get to the Ashes and see how we go. We've got to keep learning and keep getting better."

Out-of-sorts England captain Joe Root has fallen out of the ICC's top 10 Test batting rankings, while Virat Kohli has closed the gap on Steve Smith at the top.

Root was ranked the world's best five-day batsman four years ago and had been in the top 10 since August 2014.

However, he has struggled for runs of late and made just 13 across two innings in England's heavy first Test defeat to New Zealand.

Smith, who made only four in Australia's recent win over Pakistan, remains at the top of the rankings, though his lead over Kohli is just three points following the India captain's 27th century against Bangladesh.

Kohli is one of four Indians in the top 10 - along with Cheteshwar Pujara, Ajinkya Rahane and Mayank Agarwal - while New Zealand trio Kane Williamson, Henry Nicholls and Tom Latham also feature alongside Sri Lanka's Dimuth Karunaratne and England all-rounder Ben Stokes.

Pat Cummins is still top of the bowling rankings for the longest format, with Black Caps left-armer Neil Wagner up to third thanks to his match figures of 8-134 in the win over England.

New Zealand captain Kane Williamson will seek out Jofra Archer for a personal apology having said sorry on behalf of his country after the England bowler was racially abused by a fan.

An investigation was launched by New Zealand Cricket (NZC) after Archer said he was targeted during the first Test at Bay Oval.

The 24-year-old made 30 in England's second innings as Joe Root's team tried to salvage a draw, only for the Black Caps to claim an innings-and-65-run win in the final session of the last day.

After the match, Archer wrote on Twitter: "A bit disturbing hearing racial insults today whilst battling to help save my team, the crowd was been amazing this week except for that one guy."

NZC apologised to Archer and vowed to identify the spectator, and Williamson said he intends to speak with the bowler himself too.

"I will try, over the next few days if I can see him, definitely," he told stuff.co.nz.

"It's certainly against everything that we as Kiwis are about, and I certainly hope that nothing like that ever happens again.

"I can only apologise on behalf of Kiwis to Jofra, not only from our team and how we look to conduct ourselves, but what we expect of Kiwis in general."

Williamson went on to describe the abuse as "horrific".

Asked if he was shocked, he added: "Absolutely, 100 per cent.

"We were out there too and didn't hear anything… obviously we were focusing on other things.

"It's a horrific thing. In a country, and a setting where it is very much multi-cultural, it's something we need to put to bed quickly and hope nothing like that ever happens again. It certainly won't if there's any influence we can have on it."

The second Test begins in Hamilton on Thursday and England's director of cricket Ashley Giles promised Archer the full support of his team.

"The tweet that went out [from Archer] was obviously emotional. It hurts," Giles told ESPN.

"We fully support Jof - there is no place for racism in the game and Jof is part of our team. Whatever the abuse, we're right behind him.

"Our team will rally round him but it's a serious incident. He's a young man making his way in the game and we don't need this sort of thing. I'm hopeful they [NZC] will find out who did it. They're working very hard to find the culprit."

Jonny Bairstow will work with Jonathan Trott in South Africa in a bid to regain his place in the England Test side.

The wicketkeeper-batsman was dropped for the ongoing Test series in New Zealand after a disappointing Ashes on home soil.

Bairstow – who played against the Black Caps in a 3-2 Twenty20 series win - will fly out to Potchefstroom to be coached by former England batsman Trott in December.

In a statement, the England and Wales Cricket Board said the trip has been scheduled for the 30-year-old right-hander “with the aim of returning to the Test squad”.

James Anderson and Mark Wood will step up their rehabilitation from injury as they strive to prove their fitness for the upcoming tour of South Africa.

Fellow seamers Olly Stone, Craig Overton and Ollie Robinson will also attend a specialist pace bowling camp, which will be held in Potchefstroom between December 1-14.

Sri Lanka legend Rangana Herath, meanwhile, will pass on his expertise to spinners Dom Bess, Mason Crane and Amar Virdi.

Batsmen Will Jacks, James Bracey, Dan Lawrence, Keaton Jennings and Sam Hain are to benefit from the wisdom of former England batsman and current Surrey assistant head coach Vikram Solanki.

New Zealand consigned England to an innings defeat in the first Test at Mount Maunganui on Monday.

Joe Root lamented what he felt was a missed opportunity after England were crushed by New Zealand in the first Test on Monday.

England were bowled out for 197 in their second innings at Bay Oval in Mount Maunganui, falling to defeat by an innings and 65 runs.

Root elected to bat in the first Test, but England could only post 353 – a total the Black Caps raced past in making 615-9 declared to set up their victory.

The England skipper said it was a chance missed by his team as none of their batsmen made a century while BJ Watling (205) and Mitchell Santner (126) starred for New Zealand.

"We missed an opportunity when you look at the two first innings in comparison. We needed to get a score over 450 and to use that scoreboard pressure as an extra fielder," Root said.

"We did a lot of good stuff, we just need to do it for longer. It's different to the style of cricket we've had to play in our home conditions. There is stuff to address.

"It ended up being a good wicket over the course of five days. It was the right decision at the toss but not kicking on in that first innings has cost us the game.

"We can't panic and think it's the end of the world. We are working hard behind the scenes and if we come back strong, we'll hopefully level it up."

Neil Wagner (5-44) ripped through England on the final day, with only Joe Denly (35 off 142 balls) able to survive at least 100 deliveries.

Root rued England's batting and admitted there were several poor dismissals, including his own for 11.

"There were a few soft dismissals," he told Sky Sports.

"It can be quite difficult. You get yourself in a mood to defend and then you end up playing a half-hearted shot. I gave that ball [from Colin de Grandhomme] far too much respect, it should have gone for four or six over point."

The second and final Test starts in Hamilton on Friday.

New Zealand completed a crushing win over England as they beat the tourists by an innings and 65 runs in the first Test on Monday.

England managed to make it through to tea on the final day as Sam Curran (29 not out) and Jofra Archer (30) fought to salvage a draw with two wickets remaining in Mount Maunganui.

But Neil Wagner (5-44) claimed back-to-back wickets with just over 20 overs remaining to seal a memorable victory for the Black Caps.

England's backs were against the wall after BJ Watling and Mitchell Santner left the visiting side reeling at the end of day four on Sunday.

Watling's double century and Santner's (3-53) three-for prior to stumps, having scored 126 runs, had England battling at 55-3 – still 207 runs behind after New Zealand's 615-9 declared.

Joe Denly (35) and Joe Root (11) returned to the middle, with England's sights set on batting out the day against the red-hot Kiwis.

England, though, were dealt a major blow when Root fell victim to Colin de Grandhomme (1-15) in the morning session.

Ben Stokes teamed up with Denly, taking the score to 121-4 heading to the drinks break, and the all-rounder added 28 runs off 84 deliveries before his stumps were bundled over by Tim Southee (1-60).

It was the opening New Zealand – who lost Trent Boult due to rib pain – needed as Wagner took three wickets in a five-over burst to put the home side on track for a rout.

Denly, Ollie Pope (6) and Jos Buttler (0) had no answer for Wagner, who then wrapped up proceedings in devastating fashion – the Black Caps remaining undefeated in home Tests since 2017.

New Zealand paceman Trent Boult is in doubt for the second Test against England due to a rib problem.

Boult was forced from the field on day five of the opening Test in Mount Maunganui on Monday after experiencing pain in the right side of his ribs.

The experienced Black Caps quick will undergo an MRI scan on Tuesday.

Boult had figures of 0-6 in the second innings at Bay Oval, where the 30-year-old claimed 1-97 in England's first innings.

The second Test gets underway in Hamilton on Friday.

Virat Kohli feels greater interaction between young fans and players at games - along with an improved marketing strategy - could help boost attendances at Test matches in India.

Kohli's side wrapped up a comprehensive victory over Bangladesh at Eden Gardens in the first pink-ball Test on Indian soil, Umesh Yadav claiming the three wickets they required as they triumphed by an innings and 46 runs.

A seventh successive win in the format means they extend their lead at the top of the ICC's World Test Championship, keeping them on track to reach the final at Lord's in June 2021.

However, India's captain feels more should be done to attract bigger audiences on home soil, citing the need to make a trip to the Test an "experience" for spectators at the venues.

"It's very, very crucial to market Test cricket like we do Twenty20 and one-day cricket," said Kohli.

"It's not only the job of the players playing, it spreads out to the management, then to the cricket board and the home broadcaster over how you portray a particular product to the people as well.

"If you create excitement only around T20s, and not so much Test cricket, then in the psyche of the fan there is a certain template established.

"I think if there is enough buzz created around Test cricket, there will be a lot more keenness to come to the stadiums.

"I'm a big fan of having more interactive areas for people during the games, as they have abroad. Maybe a play area for games, these small things will help, maybe school children can interact with India players during lunch beyond the playing area.

"All these things will really bring that strength to Test cricket and people would want to come in and have an experience of a Test match.

"It should be an event where you experience cricket, not what you just sit there and watch in hot conditions. There has to be more for the fan."

Kohli also suggested that a change to the international schedule, with teams not playing back-to-back series on home soil, may benefit the Test Championship.

"We are definitely playing good cricket, but I don't think there should be any tags attached to any team," he said. 

"In the Test Championship, even if we make the final, there is only one game. Whoever plays well will win, it doesn't matter how many points you had at the end of the day.

"A good format would be one at home and one away, then you keep that balance moving forwards."

India now switch their focus to white-ball cricket, starting with T20 and ODI games against West Indies at home. Their next Test series is early in 2020, when they tour New Zealand.

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