David Warner made history on Saturday as he progressed to 335 not out - the highest score at Adelaide Oval - in Australia's second Test against Pakistan.

After Warner's stunning knock, which helped the dominant hosts post 589-3 declared before Pakistan slumped to 96-6, we look at the best Opta data relating to his performance.

 

- Warner's 335* is the second-highest individual score by an Australian in Test cricket, only bettered by Matthew Hayden's 380 against Zimbabwe in October 2003. Don Bradman and Mark Taylor compiled innings of 334 in 1930 and 1998 respectively.

- The Warner innings also yielded the 10th-highest score in Test history, a list topped by Brian Lara's unbeaten 400 against England in 2004.

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10 highest Test scores

400* - Brian Lara - West Indies v England, April 2004

380 - Matthew Hayden - Australia v Zimbabwe, October 2003

375 - Brian Lara - West Indies v England, April 1994

374 - Mahela Jayawardene - Sri Lanka v South Africa, July 2006

365* - Garfield Sobers - West Indies v Pakistan, February 1958

364 - Len Hutton - England v Australia, August 1938

340 - Sanath Jayasuriya - Sri Lanka v India, August 1997

337 - Hanif Mohammad - Pakistan v West Indies, January 1958

336* - Wally Hammond - England v New Zealand, March 1933

335* - David Warner - Australia v Pakistan, November 2019

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- The previous highest score at Adelaide Oval was an innings of 299 not out by Bradman against South Africa in 1932.

- Only three Australia players have passed 250 more than once in Test cricket. Warner and Michael Clarke have done so twice, while Bradman achieved the feat five times.

- Virender Sehwag (four) is the only opener to have made more 250+ scores than Warner in Tests. Warner is one of five men with two scores of 250 or more, along with Alastair Cook, Chris Gayle, Sanath Jayasuriya and Graeme Smith.

- Warner's 335* is the highest individual score in a men's day/night Test. The previous best was Azhar Ali's 302 not out against West Indies in October 2016.

David Warner never believed he was "losing it " as a batsman during his miserable Ashes series.

The Australia opener etched his name into the history books on Saturday as he struck an unbeaten 335 in the second Test against Pakistan at the Adelaide Oval.

In the process he became the seventh Australian to record a triple-century and overtook the highest score by the great Don Bradman (334) with an incredible innings that featured 39 fours and a six.

Only Matthew Hayden stands above Warner on the list of highest Test scores by an Australian, with his Herculean effort coming after an away Ashes series in which he surpassed single figures just twice.

Asked in a media conference if he ever felt he was losing it during his miserable run in England, an amused Warner replied: "Nah, never, never losing it. What kind of question is that?

"At the end of the day, you're going to have people who doubt you and, to be honest, through that whole campaign in that series, I always said I wasn't out of form, I was out of runs.

"I say this, not just in hindsight, but if I had my time again, I would have not changed my guard, I wouldn't have listened to some external noises, I would have backed myself more and batted where I have been here, outside off, leaving the ball patiently, getting my bat and pad closer together and under my nose. And I am capable of that.

"I just think in England you can get caught up in playing too much in front, especially with the way that I play. So I've had to regroup coming back from England.

"I've probably hit over three and a half to four thousand balls in the nets leading into Brisbane. And obviously here as well I've batted for a good two hours per session. It's not by chance that I've actually tightened all that up. I've actually been working really hard in the nets.

"Look, I've never doubted myself at all. It's one of those things where I'm a very confident person. Whether or not I'd scored these runs or didn't score my runs, I'd still hold my head up high and have that little smirk on my face that I always have."

Despite his historic performance, Warner still indicated he can still make improvements in terms of his focus at the crease.

"I think the last two Tests, I said in the last press conference it's probably the best I've ever batted, the most disciplined I've ever batted and the most patient I've ever batted," he added. 

"I just felt at ease, especially batting with Marnus [Labuschagne]. We were really talking about the game and I think sometimes I get carried away with talking about where I'm looking to score instead of what the bowler is actually doing and how he's trying to get me out.

"I think that will stay in the back of my mind now moving forward."

David Warner recorded the second-highest score in Australia Test history, compiling an incredible 335 not out during a remarkable day on which a series victory over Pakistan was all but secured.

Opener Warner, who made 154 in Australia's dominant victory in the series opener, surpassed Don Bradman's highest Test score by a single run in an historic performance on day two of the second rubber.

His herculean effort marked the largest individual Test score at the Adelaide Oval and lifted Australia to 589-3 declared before Pakistan quickly crumbled in response.

Save for the admirable efforts of Babar Azam (43 not out), the tourists provided precious little resistance and closed on 96-6, meaning anything other than an Australia victory in the match and the series is near impossible.

Australia had reached stumps on day one on 302-1, with Warner unbeaten on 166 and Marnus Labuschagne 126 not out.

Labuschagne added 36 more to his tally before being bowled by Shaheen Shah Afridi, but it proved a false dawn for those hoping for a Pakistan fightback.

Four balls after Labuschagne's departure, Warner brought up his double hundred by working a single to the leg side, and he continued in irrepressible form, ruthlessly taking advantage of a Pakistan attack that failed to harness any life or bounce from the surface.

Warner did receive a reprieve when he sliced to gully on 234, only for the delivery to be ruled a no-ball as Muhammad Musa overstepped his mark.

Steve Smith also made history by reaching 7,000 Test runs in his 126th Test innings, five fewer than previous record-holder Wally Hammond.

He fell for 36, but Pakistan never crafted another opportunity to end Warner's innings, which encompassed 39 fours and one maximum.

Warner, now supported by Matthew Wade (38 not out) became the seventh Australian to join the 300 club as he pulled a Mohammad Abbas short ball wide of mid-on for four.

He ran off leaping into the air in celebration and more history was to come for the left-hander, who surpassed 334 - the highest Test score achieved by the great Don Bradman - with a single by driving to sweeper cover.

Captain Tim Paine promptly declared, with Warner bowing the crowd as he took in their acclaim, and those privileged to be at the Adelaide Oval were given plenty more to celebrate as the tourists wilted in the face of the Australia attack.

Imam-ul-Haq went in the fifth over to Mitchell Starc, who did the majority of the damage with the ball by taking 4-22. Babar was the only Pakistan batsman to display any kind of composure and his team-mates' inexplicable tendency to chase wide deliveries gave Starc the wickets of Iftikhar Ahmed and Mohammad Rizwan in the same over.

Six wickets down, Pakistan faced the ignominy of being bowled out before the close. They avoided doing so, but a tour in which they have failed to win a single match will surely end in a massive defeat after Warner etched his name into the history books.

New Zealand's score of 375 in the second and final Test was arguably "300 under par", according to England bowler Stuart Broad.

England endured a tough day in the field at Hamilton's Seddon Park as a sixth-wicket partnership of 124 between BJ Watling and Daryl Mitchell frustrated them after two wickets fell in the morning session.

Broad finally ended their stand, removing each batsman within the space of four overs, though New Zealand's tail wagged and cameos from Mitchell Santner (23) and Tim Southee (18) added valuable runs.

New Zealand's hopes of clinching the two-match series 2-0 were furthered when England lost Dom Sibley and Joe Denly cheaply in their 18 overs before the close. Rory Burns and Joe Root reached stumps with England 39-2.

The Black Caps won the first Test by an innings and 65 runs on the back of a score of 615-9, and Broad believes their failure to do the same again on a batting-friendly surface means England are in a decent position.

"We won the toss and bowled – not to bowl New Zealand out for 150, we were aiming [to dismiss them] for 330-350 and then bat big once to try and win the game," said Broad.

"We thought our best chance to take 20 wickets in five days was by bowling first.

"These pitches, you've got to change your mindset a little bit. If you win the toss and bowl in England and concede 370 you'd be distraught, but here the opportunity is to bat big and bat big once.

"For us to win this game, we'll need a batter to get 150 plus, and someone else to get 100, and leave ourselves a day to bowl them out on day five. That's how New Zealand won the last test they played [in Hamilton], when they got [715]-6. So arguably, they're 300 under par.

"When you come away from home you look at what the opposition do in their home conditions – and New Zealand bowl. It's pretty rare that they win the toss and bat.

"It will be proven if it was a good decision tomorrow [Sunday] really – if we bat through the whole of tomorrow and go past New Zealand, we can apply some pressure on them in the second innings. If we don't go and get 400, we can't.

"I think our opportunity is there tomorrow. There's not a huge amount of pressure, there's not a lot happening in the pitch, there's not a big scoreboard pressure – there's a chance for a couple of people to get hundreds tomorrow.

"We need someone to go and get a big hundred for us to win this game – and we've got the players to do it."

David Warner became just the seventh Australian to make a triple-century in Tests as the opener continued to dominate Pakistan on Saturday.

The left-hander reached 300 on day two of the second Test at the Adelaide Oval thanks to his 37th four.

Warner joined Donald Bradman (twice), Bob Simpson, Bob Cowper, Mark Taylor, Matthew Hayden and Michael Clarke as Australians to reach the milestone.

It was the first time an Australia batsman had made 300 since January 2012, when Clarke achieved the feat against India in Sydney.

Warner finished with an unbeaten 335 as Australia declared at 589-3.

England were left in trouble after losing a pair of wickets late on day two of the second Test against New Zealand on Saturday.

The Black Caps were bowled out for 375 in their first innings after something of a collapse at Seddon Park in Hamilton.

Debutant Daryl Mitchell (73) and BJ Watling (55) guided New Zealand after Tom Latham's century, but the hosts – who lead the two-Test series 1-0 – lost their final five wickets for just 60.

Stuart Broad (4-73) was the pick of the bowlers but, just as England seemed boosted by that strong finish, the Black Caps hit back.

Dom Sibley (4) and Joe Denly (4) fell before stumps, leaving England at 39-2 and still trailing by 336 runs with Rory Burns (24) and Joe Root (6) unbeaten.

Sibley had been hit in the helmet by Tim Southee (1-24) before falling to the paceman, who trapped him lbw.

Burns was given a life on 10 as Ross Taylor put down a catch at first slip off Matt Henry.

But New Zealand would strike again, Watling diving low to his right to remove Denly off Henry (1-10) to cap a fine day for the hosts.

Earlier, England had made a fine start to day two as Latham (105) and Henry Nicholls (16) – the overnight batsmen – departed early.

But Mitchell and Watling led the response for New Zealand, putting together a 124-run partnership as they frustrated the tourists.

The Black Caps scored just 67 runs during the second session, although the departure of Watling – removed by a great Broad bouncer – just before tea triggered a collapse of sorts.

England managed to contain New Zealand to 375, but the fall of Sibley and Denly has left them on the back foot.

Marnus Labuschagne could scarcely believe how well Australia's day against Pakistan went as he and David Warner posted both centuries to leave them firmly on top in the second Test.

Warner and Labuschagne each recorded hundreds in the first Test, when Australia won by an innings and five runs, and the two continued their fine form with an unbeaten second-wicket stand of 294 in Adelaide on Friday.

That partnership - already the highest in day-night Tests - meant Australia reached stumps at 302-1 as Warner ended the day unbeaten on 166 while Labuschagne was not out on 126.

The latter had made a career-best 185 in the opening match of the series and was pinching himself after making his second career hundred in his very next innings.

"It's a bit surreal," he said in his on-pitch interview as he walked off with Warner.

"It's just amazing to be out here with Davey and put on a big partnership. Really happy with that.

"We were running hard, [I] almost ran myself out there at the end.

"I love the intensity at the crease and how hard we ran. It was real fun."

Warner, who reached three figures for the 23rd time in his Test career, was delighted to see Australia's number three extend his purple patch.

Labuschagne has so far scored 793 Test runs in 2019, more than any other batsman in the world.

"His knock up at Queensland was outstanding," Warner added.

"Credit to him, he started where he left off at the Gabba."

David Warner and Marnus Labuschagne each posted centuries once more as Australia dominated Pakistan on day one of the second Test.

The hosts triumphed by an innings and five runs in the first contest in Brisbane - when Warner made 154 on his first home Test since serving a 12-month ban for the sandpaper scandal - and the opener posted his 23rd hundred in the longest format at Adelaide.

Labuschagne's purple patch continued too, the Australia number three following up his Test-best 185 last time out by reaching stumps unbeaten on 126 having made an unbroken 294 alongside Warner (166 not out).

The duo ensured Australia ended the first day 302-1, with Pakistan unable to build on an early breakthrough on another chastening day.

The home side won the toss on Friday but lost Joe Burns for four in the fourth over after Shaheen Afridi got one to shape back and drew the opener's edge.

Yet that was as good as it got for the tourists, Warner feasting on some hospitable bowling outside off to get Australia going.

Test debutant Muhammad Musa was dispatched for successive fours and then bowled an eight-ball over that went for 13 before rain forced an early tea with the home side 70-1.

Upon the resumption, Warner soon reached his half-century thanks to overthrows and it was not long before Labuschagne joined him in bringing up that milestone.

Warner converted his into three figures by scampering through for a single off Yasir Shah - his 10th hundred on the first day of Tests - and Pakistan's misery continued when Afridi accidentally kicked the ball to the fence.

Labuschagne, on 94, tried to reach a century with a heave down the ground off Yasir and though the ball bounced just before the rope, he made it back-to-back hundreds off the very next ball.

The two continued to pile on the runs and moved past Alastair Cook and Joe Root's 248 for the highest partnership in day-night Tests.

Yasir's desperate lbw appeal against Warner was struck down as a review showed a clear inside edge.

The opener cracked the same bowler for his 18th boundary to reach 150 and added another as Australia moved past 300 prior to stumps on a successful day for the hosts.

Sri Lanka have named a full-strength squad for the first Tests to be played in Pakistan in a decade.

Ten high-profile players opted not to tour when Sri Lanka visited Pakistan for three one-day internationals and three T20s in September and October, with limited-overs captains Dimuth Karunaratne and Lasith Malinga among those absent.

However, Karunaratne will skipper a strong group that also includes Angelo Mathews and Dinesh Chandimal for the two Tests in Rawalpindi and Karachi.

The only change to the Sri Lanka squad that faced New Zealand in August sees Kasun Rajitha replace Akila Dananjaya, who is serving a one-year ban for an illegal action.

Pakistan have not hosted a five-day game since several Sri Lanka players and members of their coaching staff were injured in an attack on their team bus in March 2009.

These two Tests were originally scheduled to be hosted at a neutral venue because of security concerns but will now take place in Pakistan following the success of the limited-overs games in the country.

The first Test begins on December 11 in Rawalpindi.

 

Sri Lanka squad: Dimuth Karunaratne, Oshada Fernando, Kusal Mendis, Angelo Mathews, Dinesh Chandimal, Kusal Perera, Lahiru Thirimanne, Dhananjaya De Silva, Niroshan Dickwella, Dilruwan Perera, Lasith Embuldeniya, Suranga Lakmal, Lahiru Kumara, Vishwa Fernando, Kasun Rajitha, Lakshan Sandakan.

Chris Woakes fears England may not be able to call upon Ben Stokes to bowl in the remainder of the second Test against New Zealand but hopes to have the "world class" all-rounder at "full tilt".

Stokes complained of an issue with his left knee, on which he had surgery in 2016 and has continued to be troubled by, after completing his second over in Hamilton on day one.

Tom Latham was unbeaten on 101 and the Black Caps – who lead the two-Test series 1-0 – were 173-3 when rain brought an early end to play after tea.

Stokes will reportedly undergo an assessment to determine whether he will be fit to bowl again in the match.

"Ben's overs are not just a bonus, he's a world-class bowler when he's at his best. Of course we'll move his overs, whether he can bowl or not I don't know," said the recalled Woakes, who claimed the big scalps of Kane Williamson and Ross Taylor.

"He's obviously got a bit of pain in that left knee, I don't know exactly what it is but of course we want a Ben Stokes at full tilt if we can because he's world class.

"Ben is one of the hardest trainers and works hard on his fitness and everything. Hopefully we can get that right. The medical team will be working really hard to do that.

"There's a bit of a gap between the end of this Test match and the start of the South Africa one so hopefully [they can] get him as close to 100 per cent as possible."

Latham made the most of a reprieve on 66, having been put down by a diving Stokes in the slips, to register a fifth hundred in his past 10 Test innings.

"Ben, in particular, is probably the hardest trainer I've ever seen, particularly when it comes to his fielding and his catching," Woakes said.

"It's just the way it goes. Unfortunately we've put a couple down and it's hurt us, hopefully this one won't hurt us quite as badly as the last one did."

West Indies needed just an hour to complete a nine-wicket rout of Afghanistan on day three of the one-off Test in Lucknow.

Resuming on 109-7, Afghanistan only lasted another 7.1 overs as Windies captain Jason Holder claimed the remaining three wickets on Friday.

Afghanistan were skittled for 120 – a lead of just 31 – after Holder (3-20) sent Rashid Khan (1), Yamin Ahmadzai (1) and Afsar Zazai (7) back to the pavilion.

The Windies then eased to victory, despite Amir Hamza (1-5) getting Kraigg Brathwaite (8) caught behind, as John Campbell (19 not out) and Shai Hope (6 not out) led the team to 33-1.

Shamarh Brooks' maiden Test century and a 10-wicket haul from Rahkeem Cornwall had put the Windies in complete control on day two.

"I'm delighted with my performance," Cornwall said after being named man of the match. "Playing for West Indies was my dream as a youngster and now 10 wickets in a Test match is amazing."

Tom Latham drove New Zealand with an unbeaten century before rain halted proceedings on day one of the second and final Test against England.

Latham posted 101 by tea to have the Black Caps 173-3 when the rain hit Hamilton and ended play prematurely on Friday.

Stuart Broad and Chris Woakes had New Zealand 39-2 after claiming the scalps of Jeet Raval (5) and captain Kane Williamson (4).

But Latham, with some help from Ross Taylor (53), helped steady the ship as New Zealand look to seal a series win over touring England.

Reeling after a humbling to the Black Caps in the series opener – beaten by an innings and 65 runs in Mount Maunganui – England handed a debut to Zak Crawley in place of the injured Jos Buttler.

Woakes (2-41) was also called up at the expense of Jack Leach and it appeared to be an inspired change after England won the toss and bowled first.

After Broad (1-33) sent Raval back to the pavilion in the seventh over, Woakes justified his selection with two wickets against New Zealand.

Williamson's stay at the crease was also brief after giving Joe Root his second catch of the morning off an angling Woakes delivery.

Latham stepped up and Taylor's arrival helped upped the ante for New Zealand – the latter bringing up a 99-ball fifty before Woakes struck the very next delivery prior to tea.

But Latham continued on, celebrating his 11th Test ton and fifth in his last 10 innings to put the Black Caps in a strong position before the weather wreaked havoc late in the afternoon.

At 31 years old, Shamarh Brooks is playing in just his second Test, but he will not allow that late start to create anxiety that could mean he performs at less than his best for the West Indies.

Shamarh Brooks struck a magnificent maiden Test century before Rahkeem Cornwall claimed a 10-wicket match haul on day two to leave West Indies closing in on victory against Afghanistan.

Brooks showed great skill and application in only his third Test to make 111 after John Campbell fell for 55 as the Windies posted 277 in Lucknow.

Debutant Amir Hamza took 5-74 on a turning pitch to restrict the Windies' lead to 90 runs, but Afghanistan were reduced to 109-7 at stumps - leading by only 19 and facing a heavy defeat.

Cornwall claimed brilliant Test-best figures of 7-75 in only his second international on day one and helped himself to 3-41 on Thursday.

Roston Chase (3-10) also took advantage of spin-friendly conditions at Ekana International Cricket Stadium, striking a big blow by removing Javed Ahmadi for 62 with the final ball of the day.

Campbell and Brooks got Jason Holder's side off to a solid start after resuming on 68-2, but the opener departed when Ihsanullah took a fine catch anticipating the sweep off Hamza to end a stand of 82.

Shimron Hetmyer and Chase also fell before lunch, but Brooks played positively in the morning session, before reigning it in somewhat following the break.

Shane Dowrich (42) offered support to take the Windies into the lead and Brooks attacked Rashid Khan (3-114) after the wicketkeeper-batsman was removed by Zahir Khan.

Elegant Barbados batsman Brooks had struck a six and 15 fours by the time he was bowled by impressive left-armer Hamza.

Just as in their first innings, Afghanistan got off to an encouraging start, but they were 59-4 after losing four wickets for six runs - burly spinner Cornwall taking two in one over.

Ahmadi stood firm as wickets tumbled around him, but Chase produced a devastating late burst and had the opener caught by Cornwall just before the close to leave Afghanistan on the ropes.

England wicketkeeper-batsman Jos Buttler is a doubt for the second Test against New Zealand after suffering a back spasm.

Buttler sustained the injury in training and could miss the final match of the series against the Black Caps at Seddon Park, which starts on Friday.

Ollie Pope will take the gloves if Buttler is ruled out in Hamilton, where the tourists need a victory to salvage a 1-1 draw after they were hammered by an innings and 65 runs in Mount Maunganui.

England captain Joe Root said: "Jos has tweaked his back in the gym. We'll have to find out a little bit more information on that throughout today and see where he's at."

Root suggested England could select an extra bowler if Buttler is unable to play.

"There's a number of different combinations we could go with and I think a lot of that will rely on the surface," the batsman added.

"Trying to find the best combination, which would take 20 wickets, and then balancing that in terms of getting the batting where we want it to be. It could be an allrounder, we'll see."

Hamilton-born all-rounder Daryl Mitchell will make his Test debut for New Zealand in place of Colin de Grandhomme, who suffered an abdominal tear.

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