Virat Kohli is expecting to play all three forms of international cricket for the next three years, at which point he will re-evaluate his workload.

The 31-year-old India captain, who is preparing to lead his side in the first of two Test matches against New Zealand on Friday, feels the topic of player workloads at the highest level of cricket is not going to go away.

For Kohli, occasional breaks from India duty, such as when he was rested for the T20I matches against Bangladesh in November, are his best way of coping with what he feels are intense demands.

"I think it's been eight or nine years that I have been playing almost 300 days a year with the travelling and practice sessions," Kohli told reporters before the opening Test in Wellington.

"The intensity is right up there all the time, so it does take a toll on you. 

"We do choose to take a lot more breaks individually even though the schedule might not allow you to. 

"You are going to see a lot of that in the future from many players. Not just myself, especially from the guys who are playing all three formats. It's not that easy.

"Periodic breaks for me seems to work pretty okay. At a time when the body doesn't respond as well, maybe when I am 34 or 35, you might have a different conversation at that stage. 

"But, for the next two to three years, I have no issues at all. So the mindset is on the larger picture, and from that point, I am preparing myself for a rigorous three years from now."

The responsibilities of being captain are an added pressure for Kohli, who is the world's highest ranked batsman in Test and ODI cricket.

The 31-year-old added: "Being captain, having intensity in practice sessions and discussing the game, it does take a toll on you.

"I can keep going on with the same intensity and I also understand that the team wants a lot of my contribution so that we can ease into another transition phase that we faced some five or six years ago."

India have won the last five Test series they have played, though they come into the New Zealand games on the back of a mixed limited-overs slate.

New Zealand triumphed 3-0 in the ODI series after India had stormed to a 5-0 victory in the T20Is between the two nations.

Matt Henry has been called up to the New Zealand squad as cover for Neil Wagner ahead of the first Test against India starting on Friday.

Wagner and his wife are awaiting the birth of their first child and the paceman could miss the series opener in Wellington.

The Black Caps confirmed on Wednesday that Henry had been called up as cover for the left-armer.

"Matt Henry has been called into the Black Caps Test squad as cover for Neil Wagner who is awaiting the birth of his child," they wrote on Twitter.

"Henry will arrive in Wellington this evening. #NZvIND."

New Zealand go into the two-Test series on the back of a 3-0 ODI series victory following a 5-0 T20 loss.

Faf du Plessis has stepped down as the Test and Twenty20 captain of South Africa.

The 35-year-old was replaced by Quinton de Kock as ODI captain in January and, with immediate effect, no longer leads the Proteas in any form of the game.

Du Plessis wants to continue contributing as a batsman and senior player and will advise the new leadership group as of the team's succession planning, Cricket South Africa said in a statement on Monday.

Mushfiqur Rahim is back in the Bangladesh squad for the one-off Test against Zimbabwe – but there is no place for Mahmudullah.

Having opted out of the Test match in Pakistan earlier in February due to security concerns, wicketkeeper-batsman Mushfiqur returns for the game in Dhaka.

Uncapped duo Yasir Ali and Hasan Mahmud are also included in a 16-man party.

However, batsman Mahmudullah misses out after only posting one half-century in his last 10 Test innings. Fellow batsman Soumya Sarkar and pace-bowling duo Rubel Hossain and Al-Amin Hossain are also omitted.

Spinner Mehidy Hasan Miraz is fit again and there are recalls for left-arm seamer Mustafizur Rahman and paceman Taskin Ahmed.

"I believe we have selected the best possible Test squad under present circumstances. There is a very nice blend of experience and potential," said Panel Minhajul Abedin, Bangladesh's chairman of selectors.

The solitary Test against Zimbabwe begins at the Shere Bangla National Stadium on February 22.

 

Bangladesh Test squad: Mominul Haque (captain), Tamim Iqbal, Saif Hassan, Najmul Hossain Shanto, Mushfiqur Rahim, Mohammad Mithun, Liton Das, Taijul Islam, Abu Jayed Chowdhury, Nayeem Hasan, Ebadot Hossain, Taskin Ahmed, Mehidy Hasan Miraz, Mustafizur Rahman, Hasan Mahmud, Yasir Ali.

India have been given a major boost ahead of the Test series against New Zealand after Ishant Sharma was passed fit to return from an ankle injury.

The paceman has been out of action since hurting his right ankle while appealing for an lbw decision in Delhi's Ranji Trophy victory over Vidarbha last month.

It was feared Ishant would miss a two-match series against Kane Williamson's side after an MRI scan showed he had suffered muscle damage.

However, Ishant on Saturday revealed he had passed a fitness test and expressed his gratitude to Ashish Kaushik, head physio at the National Cricket Academy in Bangalore, six days before the first Test starts in Wellington.

The 31-year-old quick tweeted: "It was a roller coaster ride for me after the injury on my ankle on the 20th January but with the help of Ashish Kaushik I managed to pull it off! Scans were a little scary, but today I am happy that I am fit! Thanks Ashish Kaushik."

Ishant will be just two shy of the 100-Test landmark if he plays in both matches against the Black Caps.

Meanwhile, India were 59 without loss at stumps on day two of a three-day tour match in Hamilton, leading a New Zealand XI by 87 runs after bowling them out for 235.

Mohammed Shami took 3-17, while there were two apiece for Jasprit Bumrah, Umesh Yadav and Navdeep Saini.

Keaton Jennings and Ben Foakes have been recalled for England's Test series in Sri Lanka but there is no place for Jonny Bairstow or James Anderson.

Jennings has not played for his country since being dropped following the series defeat to West Indies a year ago, but the opening batsman returns along with Foakes.

Wicketkeeper-batsman Foakes has also been overlooked since the loss in the Caribbean, despite making such an impressive start to his England career in Sri Lanka in November 2018.

Jennings and Foakes both scored centuries in a 3-0 whitewash of Sri Lanka, where the latter was named man of the series.

Bairstow was brought back into the Test squad for the recent 3-1 win in South Africa, but failed in both innings of the defeat at Centurion and played no part in the rest of the series.

The Yorkshireman misses out along with Anderson, who will continue his recovery from the cracked rib suffered in the second Test at Newlands to prepare for the English season.

"Jonny Bairstow has been in England squads across the three formats without a significant break," said national selector Ed Smith. "This two-Test tour presents a good opportunity for Jonny to be rested.

"Jimmy Anderson will continue to work with Lancashire and the ECB so that he is ready for the start of the County Championship season leading into the Test series against the West Indies in June."

All-rounder Moeen Ali remains unavailable selection in the longest format, but fellow spinner Jack Leach has recovered from illness to take his place in the 16-man squad.

Uncapped leg-spinner Matt Parkinson is also included for the two-match series, which starts in Galle on March 19.

 

England squad: Joe Root (captain), Dom Bess, Stuart Broad, Jos Buttler, Zak Crawley, Sam Curran, Joe Denly, Ben Foakes, Keaton Jennings, Jack Leach, Matt Parkinson, Ollie Pope, Dom Sibley, Ben Stokes, Chris Woakes, Mark Wood.

David Warner says he is most likely to retire from Twenty20 internationals over the coming years in order to prolong his Test and ODI careers with Australia.

The batsman, who this week won his third Allan Border Medal, is eager to play the upcoming T20 World Cup tournaments in 2020 and 2021, though he is pondering stepping down from the shortest form of the game after that.

Warner was also named Australia's Twenty20 player of the year at Monday's awards ceremony.

But the 33-year-old did not play the most recent edition of the Big Bash League and the international T20s could be the next to go.

"I don't have a BBL team; I took a break during this period, and that was about my body and my mind, making sure I'm getting ready for the next series that comes up," said Warner.  

"If you look at T20 internationals, we've got back-to-back World Cups as well, that's probably a format that could be one I'd probably drop in a few years.

"I have to look at the schedule; it's going to be very difficult [for me] to play all three forms, and good luck to all the guys who want to keep playing that. 

"You talk to guys like AB de Villiers and Virender Sehwag, these guys who've done it for a long time, it does become challenging. 

"Having three young kids and my wife at home all the time, the constant travelling becomes very difficult. 

"If it was to come down to [leaving out] one format, it would probably be the international T20s."

The BBL has increased in size every year and is now a mammoth 61-match event, though Warner insisted that is not the only factor at play in his decision to step aside.

Warner added: "For me it's about working out timeframes with different series, identify when you need a bit of a rest.

"Generally, we play a Test series and go into a one-day series. We went to India and then generally you have a one-day series at home, back-to-back games and then you go away. 

"So, it was a bit different this year; I was able to have that opportunity to have that break which I'm grateful for.

"A lot of the guys try to go back and play as much as they can. Sometimes, you look at the [BBL] finals as an example, they come back and play the final.

"You're taking someone's spot as well, which is always tough as a player, you don't want to come back and just take someone's spot for one game."

Chris Silverwood says England may reduce Jofra Archer's workload when he returns to fitness after the paceman suffered a low-grade stress fracture of his right elbow.

Archer flew home from the tour of South Africa last week and has been ruled out of the Test series against Sri Lanka and the Indian Premier League, although Rajasthan Royals are still hoping he can play a part in the tournament.

England Test captain Joe Root denied the paceman has been overbowled early in his international career.

Head coach Silverwood has conceded that England may need to consider using Archer in shorter spells to give him the best opportunity to stay fit.

"Things like [bowling 40 overs in an innings] we have to look at," Silverwood said. "But sometimes, when needs must, you've got to do it.

"We managed Mark Wood through both the Test matches he's played here and he's bowled in short, sharp spells. Would we look to do that now with Jof? Yes, we probably would."

Archer bowled more overs than any of his England team-mates last year, but Silverwood would not take a different approach if he could go back in time.

"Not really. It's just a case of: his injury occurred, the first scan didn't show us where it was, the second has. We can now put a plan in place and get him going for our summer," the former England seamer said.

"Being a fast bowler is hard work. It is hard work. Ask Jimmy [Anderson], ask [Stuart] Broad, ask any of them. Being a fast bowler is hard work. It's just how it is."

He added: "We can't turn the clock back, all we can do is look to the future and say, 'Well, how are we going to do it from now on?'"

 

Sohail Tanveer hailed "very special" pace sensation Naseem Shah after the 16-year-old took a record-breaking hat-trick in Pakistan's Test victory over Bangladesh.

Naseem made history in Rawalpindi on Sunday, becoming the youngest bowler to take three wickets in as many balls in the longest format.

The paceman, who turns 17 on Saturday, has shown enormous potential since becoming the ninth-youngest Test player when he made his debut against Australia in the cauldron of the Gabba last November.

Tanveer, who harbours hopes of making a Pakistan comeback, has seen Naseem's ability at close quarters while training with Pakistan Super League side Quetta Gladiators and believes Pakistan have unearthed a gem.

The quick told Omnisport: "Unfortunately Naseem was injured for the PSL last year, but when I first saw him in the nets I thought this kid has serious talent, I've never seen someone of that age bowl so fast and he can bowl with control as well.

"He has incredible ability and is a really exciting talent. To play Test cricket at that age and make the step up like he has is amazing. He is very special.

"He's a quiet guy, he doesn't say a lot, but he knows if he needs to ask any of the senior players for advice then we are there for that."

Tanveer is optimistic Pakistan can be a force in all formats with a combination of youth and experience.

"We have seen youngsters coming in and developing, such as Shaheen Shah Afridi and Naseem Shah," the leading wicket-taker in the 2019 National T20 Cup said.

"We are seeing some serious talent and the day will come where you have the right combination.

"We have Babar Azam and we hope to see more young batting talent come through, then we have [Mohammad] Hafeez and [Shoaib] Malik now to offer a mixture of youth and experience. I'm hopeful Pakistan cricket is in good hands and I really hope things will keep getting better."

Naseem was cleared of serious injury after complaining of a rib problem on day three of a crushing innings-and-44-run victory over the Tigers.

David Warner showed his emotion and expressed gratitude for being allowed back into the Australia set-up as he accepted his third Allan Border Medal.

Having been reintegrated to the team after his involvement in the ball-tampering scandal against South Africa in 2018 resulted in a one-year ban, Warner edged out Steve Smith by one vote to win the country's top individual prize.

He expressed his thanks to team-mates, coaches and Cricket Australia after beating Smith and last year's winner Pat Cummins to the accolade.

Warner also fought back the tears as he thanked his parents and wife Candice, who he described as his "rock and inspiration".

"I'm taken aback by this," said Warner. "It has been quite challenging. I want to thank Cricket Australia, Belinda Clark, Kevin Roberts and Justin Langer for that opportunity [to come back].

"You were really working your backsides off behind the scenes to reintegrate the three of us [Warner, Smith and Cameron Bancroft] into the cricketing family.

"Everything to get us back in there amongst the guys, taking us to Dubai, starting that way, was absolutely fantastic and the way [ODI captain] Aaron Finch and [Test captain] Tim Paine accepted us and were always in contact with us, we really appreciate that. 

"I want to thank my home club team at Randwick-Petersham for giving me that opportunity to go out there and play grade cricket. 

"I realised a lot of things during that time off that we don't actually understand or realise when we're in this bubble, the importance of what this game is and the smiles on the faces that we bring to a lot of people.

"Sitting back and reflecting upon the time I had away from the game, you don't realise the importance and effect it has on everyone. It put things in perspective.

"Getting cricket taken away from you, something you've always dreamed of, it really hurt, so I'm just extremely grateful to be accepted back by Cricket Australia, the peers and also by the fans. 

"I had mixed emotions about how I was going to be received back here at home - I definitely knew what I was in for in England and obviously in a couple of weeks' time [in South Africa]. But it's just been remarkable to come back.

"Standing here I'm just really proud to have that opportunity again." 

Warner struggled in the Ashes but otherwise enjoyed a superb year across all formats.

But he thought his woes against England would have cost him a shot at the Allan Border Medal, which only Michael Clarke and Ricky Ponting have won on more occasions.

"It was a shock and a surprise," he said. "When it is that close, you really don't know so it's a big surprise to be honest.

"I had an absolutely horrendous Ashes and generally, across the Test matches, that's where a lot of the votes are polled, so I didn't think I had a chance.

"I really had the hunger and determination to come back and do the best for our team. We've been great across all three formats for 12 months, I couldn't be any prouder to stand here and receive the award."

David Warner has won the Allan Border Medal for the third time after edging out team-mate Steve Smith by the narrowest of margins.

Australia opener Warner polled 194 votes, one more than Smith, while last year's winner Pat Cummins was also close behind with 185.

Marnus Labuschagne won the award for Men's Test Player of the Year, with Smith again coming a close second, while Aaron Finch claimed the ODI honour for the first time and Warner made it a double by landing the T20I gong.

Warner previously won the Allan Border Medal in 2016 and 2017, with four-time winners Ricky Ponting and Michael Clarke the only players to have won the accolade, considered the most prestigious individual prize in Australian men's cricket, on more occasions.

The 33-year-old impressed across all formats during last season, scoring three centuries at the Cricket World Cup at an average of 71.88.

Warner struggled as Australia retained the Ashes in England but rebounded with superb home Test performances against Pakistan, versus whom he scored 335 not out in Adelaide, and then New Zealand.

The batsman's T20 form was spectacular, as he averaged 147.61 in three clashes with Sri Lanka and 140 in another trio of matches against Pakistan, helping him to see off 2019 winner Glenn Maxwell in the voting for the T20 honour in addition to the Allan Border Medal.

Warner and Smith both impressed as they returned from one-year suspensions in 2019 after their involvement in the ball-tampering affair the previous year.

The Australian Cricket Awards are voted for by players, the media and umpires after each Australia game.

Fast bowler Wes Agar was named The Bradman Young Cricketer of the Year, while in the women's game The Belinda Clark Award went to Ellyse Perry, who like Warner is a three-time winner of the top prize available.

Yasir Shah finished with a four-for as Pakistan made swift work of seeing off the Bangladesh tail to wrap up an emphatic victory by an innings and 44 runs on day four of the first Test.

Teenage sensation Naseem Shah had done the bulk of the damage on Sunday when he became the youngest player to take a Test hat-trick.

Bangladesh started Monday's play 126-6, still 86 runs in arrears, and were all out for 168 with Yasir (4-58) claiming the last two wickets to earn Pakistan 60 points in the ICC Test Championship.

Already fighting a losing battle, Bangladesh's task was even more daunting in the first over of the day at the Rawalpindi Cricket Stadium after Mominul Haque (41) was trapped leg-before by Shaheen Afridi.

Liton Das (29) and Rubel Hossain (5) showed resistance for 12 overs before the latter was sent back lbw by Mohammad Abbas, having overturned a review off the same bowler shortly before.

Yasir then got in on the act, pinning Das in front before tempting Abu Jayed (3) into a top edge off a slog sweep to Asad Shafiq in the slips, which brought an end to proceedings.

The second and final Test does not begin until April 5, when Pakistan will look to complete a series win in Karachi.

Adil Rashid has ruled out representing England on their upcoming Test tour of Sri Lanka, suggesting it would be unfair for him to earn selection given his lack of county cricket action.

Rashid took 12 wickets as England claimed a 3-0 Test series win on their last visit to Sri Lanka in 2018.

However, after enjoying a successful return to the ODI fold on Sunday, claiming 3-51 as England beat South Africa in Johannesburg to rescue a 1-1 series draw, the leg-spinner said he did not feel comfortable about taking a Test place at someone else's expense.

Rashid, whose most recent first-class appearance came more than a year ago, was previously brought back to England's Test team despite a lack of red-ball action but appears unwilling to benefit from a similar call again.

"That's something that I personally feel I've got to earn again," he said in a news conference.

"I've got to go back into maybe county cricket, get the performances under my belt and then get selected on merit. I think if the selectors do come up and ask, 'Are you available, can you play', for me that would be a straight no, I can't, because I feel as if I've got to deserve my place back in the team."

In an interview with Sky Sports, Rashid added: "I think it's a bit unfair for me to just say 'Yeah, I'm available'. At this moment in time, I'm really concentrating on white-ball cricket. Maybe in the future [I will return to Test cricket]."

England will play two Tests in Sri Lanka next month, but Rashid's focus is on the Twenty20 series that rounds off the tour of South Africa.

His man-of-the-match display in Johannesburg, in his 100th ODI, was hugely encouraging given he has been hampered by a long-standing shoulder problem.

"It's probably been a year now, my shoulder has not been quite right," Rashid told Sky Sports. "I took some time off after [the tour of] New Zealand, had a couple of months where I really did some hard rehab, got a lot better, and slowly, gradually, it's building on that.

"I'm still going to carry on doing the shoulder work and hopefully I can get that even stronger and better.

"Once you have that shoulder injury, that niggle, then you feel it, especially as a leg-spinner - you might struggle to get that extra zip, extra pace.

"I had a few injections during the World Cup, prior to the World Cup as well, and got through it somehow, but now it's that time where there's not much cricket being played, I can really nail down the gym [work] and really get it strong."

Mark Boucher said missed opportunities cost South Africa as they suffered a two-wicket defeat to England in the third and final ODI in Johannesburg.

Despite a late wobble with the bat, England claimed victory with 40 balls unused on Sunday to ensure the three-match series finished level at 1-1, the second game in Durban having been washed out.

Boucher felt his team were "30 to 40 runs short" when making 256-7 with the bat, while they then made an abysmal start with the ball as Jonny Bairstow (43 off 23 balls) got stuck into Lungi Ngidi and Beuran Hendricks.

Although South Africa fought back, dropped chances from Joe Denly and Tom Banton hindered their hopes of turning things around.

"We were probably 30 or 40 runs short and then, with the ball, we just started off really, really poorly and we were playing catch-up after that," said Boucher in a news conference.

"We had chances and we didn't take our opportunities. When you are 30 to 40 runs short, you have got to bowl well, especially up front, and you've got to take your opportunities.

"We didn't do that. That's why we lost."

South Africa and England both rested frontline players for the ODI series, and Boucher indicated the Proteas would continue to experiment in their next 50-over matches against Australia.

"It's a long time until the next [50-over] World Cup, so we can afford to do that," he added.

"There are a lot of good things that happened and a couple of things we need to work on, obviously, but it is quite difficult to judge over two games.

"We'll probably use the next three games against Australia to find out some answers and ask some questions. We do believe we're going in the right direction."

Former skipper Faf du Plessis is likely to return against Australia, though, after being rested and replaced as captain by Quinton de Kock for the ODI and T20 series with England.

"We feel at this point in time he [Du Plessis] needs a bit of a break away from the game," Boucher explained.

"I would like to think, against Australia, the rest will be enough and they [Du Plessis and Kagiso Rabada] can come back and play."

James Anderson does not know if he has reached his peak yet, with England's record wicket-taker talking up the possibility of playing beyond his 40th birthday.

The 37-year-old has taken 584 Test wickets and has a further 269 to his name in one-day cricket, making him the most prolific bowler for his country in both formats.

But despite his advancing age and recent injury issues, Anderson believes his best cricket may still be ahead of him. 

He told Sky Sports on Sunday: "There's always going to be that element of, ‘Well he's 37'. There's a stigma for some reason around sportsmen getting to a certain age with a, 'Well, it's about time he moved on' sort of thing. For me, I genuinely don't know if I've peaked yet as a bowler.

"For me, in my head, why does 37 have to be towards the end? Cooky [Alastair Cook] said he's not going to be playing when he's 45 – probably not, but I've seen bowlers go into their 40s. It's not impossible."

Anderson's latest fitness setback came when he sustained a broken rib during the second Test against South Africa in early January.

The Lancashire paceman recently outlined his goal to return for the tour of Sri Lanka, which starts in March. 

"I've been training for a few weeks now, getting my bowling back up to speed. I feel really good," he told Sky Sports on Friday.

"The aim for me is to get fit for whatever is next and, at the moment, that is Sri Lanka."

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