Grigor Dimitrov ended third seed Stefanos Tsitsipas' Vienna Open hopes with a battling last-16 win on Thursday.

Tsitsipas, who took Novak Djokovic to five sets in the French Open semi-finals this month, had come from behind to beat Jan-Lennard Struff in his opener in Austria but was this time on the wrong end of a fightback.

The Greek edged the first set after a tie-break but failed to convert either of his break points in a 6-7 (5-7) 6-4 6-3 reverse.

It was Dimitrov who prevailed after two hours and 14 minutes for his first top-10 win of the season, securing a quarter-final against Dan Evans.

"It's never easy to come out of a situation like that," Dimitrov said. "I was focused, but he went for it.

"In the tie-break a few close calls here and there went his way. [There was] not much else I could have done, I felt. But I kept on believing and kept on doing the right things.

"I stayed in the match, which I think was the most important thing. He's such a great competitor. You always have to be ready. I was just focusing on the most simple things of the game."

The other seeds found life a little easier on Thursday, with Dominic Thiem and Andrey Rublev each through to face one another.

Reigning champion Thiem brushed aside Cristian Garin in straight sets, while Rublev was granted a walkover as Jannik Sinner succumbed to a foot injury early in their meeting.

Daniil Medvedev also advanced but needed three sets after dropping the first to Vasek Pospisil.

Djokovic was not in action, meanwhile, but learned the identity of his Friday quarter-final opponent as Lorenzo Sonego reached the last eight.

Novak Djokovic battled to a straight-sets win over compatriot Filip Krajinovic in the opening round of the Vienna Open. 

The world number one, competing in the Austrian event for the first time since winning it in 2007, saved a set point in a tie-break during the opener on his way to a 7-6 (8-6) 6-3 triumph. 

He had to work hard as Krajinovic, who lost to Djokovic in last month's Italian Open at the last-16 stage, twice broke serve in a tight opener, helping establish a 5-3 lead at one point. 

Djokovic hit back in the 10th game to break his opponent for a second time as the opener went to a tie-break, which he edged 8-6 after Krajinovic failed to convert an opportunity when 6-5 up. 

The second set was far more straightforward for the 33-year-old, however, as he held serve throughout and broke Krajinovic once to progress through.

"We practiced a few times [together] before coming to Vienna," Djokovic revealed in his on-court interview. 

"The draw was tough for us to face each other, but there is always extra pressure and importance to a match when you play someone that you know very well."

Borna Coric is up next for Djokovic after the world number 26 beat Taylor Fritz on the opening day of action. 

Elsewhere on Tuesday, Grigor Dimitrov held off fellow top-20 player Karen Khachanov 7-6 (8-6) 6-3 in a competitive match, while Hubert Hurkacz beat Attila Balazs in straight sets. 

Dan Evans also advanced to the last 16, where Jurij Rodionov awaits, after Aljaz Bedene withdrew with a thigh complaint when a set down.

Alexander Zverev defeated Jannik Sinner in straight sets in Saturday's Cologne Championships semi-final to remain on course for a second ATP title in the space of a week.

The 23-year-old lost to Sinner at the last-16 stage of the French Open earlier this month but was too strong for the wildcard entrant in this latest match, prevailing 7-6 (7-3) 6-3.

Zverev, who carried a hip injury into the contest, lost serve in the fourth game but responded well and converted his first match point with a blistering serve.

He held throughout the second set and will now face Diego Schwartzman, who beat last week's beaten Cologne Indoors finalist Felix Auger-Aliassime in the other semi.

Second seed Schwartzman came out on top 6-4 5-7 6-4 in two hours and 31 minutes to reach his third final of 2020, converting four of five break points.

Ugo Humbert saved four match points against Dan Evans on the way to reaching the European Open final in Antwerp, meanwhile, battling to a 4-6 7-6 (9-7) 6-4 victory.

The opportunities for Evans all came the Briton's way in a second-set tie-break, with Humbert coming back from 6-3 behind and then 7-6 in the breaker to keep his hopes alive.

He found a way to level the match before edging the decider, with the 22-year-old French left-hander sealing his place in a second final of 2020 after winning in Auckland back in January.

It took him three hours and 14 minutes to complete the task, but at least Humbert had the evening off as Alex de Minaur and Grigor Dimitrov battled it out to join him in the final.

And it was eighth-seeded Australian De Minaur who claimed the victory in a tight match that lasted two hours and 48 minutes.

De Minaur held his nerve to triumph 7-6 (7-4) 6-7 (3-7) 6-4 to reach his first tour-level final in 12 months, losing to Roger Federer on the previous occasion at the Swiss Indoors Basel.

Alexander Zverev started his quest to win back-to-back ATP tournaments in Cologne with a battling victory over John Millman.

Zverev was crowned Cologne Indoors champion last weekend and the US Open runner-up moved into the quarter-finals of the Cologne Championships on Wednesday.

The top seed beat Australian Millman 6-0 3-6 6-3, despite double-faulting 10 times, and has now won 11 of his last 12 matches on hard courts.

Zverev saved six of the seven break points Millman earned and won 79 per cent of points behind his first serve, setting up a last-eight meeting with eighth seed Adrian Mannarino.

Mannarino was a 6-3 6-3 winner against Miomir Kecmanovic, while Alejandro Davidovich Fokina advanced to the quarter-finals following a 7-6 (7-3) 6-3 victory over Steve Johnson.

Felix Auger-Aliassime, beaten by Zverev in the final on Sunday, rallied past qualifier Egor Gerasimov 4-6 7-6 (7-2) 7-6 (7-4).

Pablo Carreno Busta slumped to a surprise defeat at the European Open in Antwerp, Ugo Humbert beating the second seed 5-7 6-3 6-4.

Frenchman Humbert was joined in the quarter-finals by Grigor Dimitrov, Alex De Minaur and Dan Evans, while Milos Raonic and Taylor Fritz progressed to the round of 16.

Stefanos Tsitsipas claimed his 25th win of the year to progress to the last 16 of the French Open.

The fifth seed became the first Greek player to reach this stage at Roland Garros on multiple occasions after overcoming Aljaz Bedene.

Tsitsipas and Grigor Dimitrov will meet for the first time in the fourth round, with each having had curtailed time on court on Saturday as their respective opponents retired.

Marton Fucsovics set up a showdown with in-form Andrey Rublev, but the day arguably belonged to Daniel Altmaier, whose remarkable run continues after he dispatched world number eight Matteo Berrettini.

 

TSITSIPAS READY FOR REAL TEST

Tsitsipas barely broke sweat as he advanced to the last 16, with Bedene retiring with a foot problem in the third set.

The pair had only been on court for 80 minutes, Tsitsipas having taken a commanding 6-1 6-2 3-1 lead against the clearly hampered Slovenian.

While the match inevitably lost a level of intrigue, the same cannot be said for Tsitsipas at these finals. The 22-year-old, whose personalised face masks have been a hit at the championships, has also made a point of keeping his media duties interesting.

Perhaps that comes in part from the young Tsitsipas' journalistic background. "I was a journalist when I was 11, 12 years old. I had this Facebook page, which I very often updated with news about Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic," he explained.

"I was really into it. Every day after school I would check the results, check the current, latest tennis news. I would update it. It was a lot of fun, I enjoyed doing it.

"Journalism and press and media, I love this a lot. I do understand how it operates, how it works. So for me, you know, I'm a tennis player, and if something works, I'm on the court the next day  trying to do the same thing. For me sometimes there isn't really much for me to say tactical-wise or match-wise because I'm just trying to follow the things that have been working for me."

Tsitsipas will now meet Dimitrov, who had even less time on court against Roberto Carballes, the Spaniard retiring at 1-6 3-6 down with a little over an hour played.

It is the first time Dimitrov, a semi-finalist at each of the other majors in his career, has reached the second week in Paris.

ARE YOU NOT ENTERTAINED?

Altmaier produced the finest two hours and 15 minutes of his career as he defeated Berrettini, a semi-finalist at last year's US Open, in straight sets.

The seventh seed lost 6-2 7-6 (7-5) 6-4 to the German qualifier, who is ranked 186th in the world and nearly did not compete in Paris due to injury.

"My coach and I have been working so hard to be here, and while I've struggled with a few injuries, I am super-pleased it’s at Roland Garros," said Altmaier, who is just the fifth qualifier since 2000 to reach the last 16 of a men's slam.

"Before qualifying, I was struggling with an injury, so I wasn't sure I was going to play. I hope the crowd and the TV audience enjoyed watching, as I want to entertain."

Next up for Altmaier will be Pablo Carreno Busta – himself a US Open semi-finalist just three weeks ago – after he beat compatriot Roberto Bautista Agut 6-4 6-3 5-7 6-4 in three hours and 22 minutes.

FUCSOVICS READY FOR RUBLEV

Rublev's winning streak stretched to eight matches as he made light work of big-serving Kevin Anderson, winning 6-3 6-2 6-3 in just 94 minutes.

Anderson, the former world number five, hit 33 unforced errors and won just four points on Rublev's first serve as he fell to the Russian.

Rublev will now face Fucsovics, who beat Brazil's Thiago Monteiro 7-5 6-1 6-3. It will be their first meeting since the 2017 Davis Cup, when Fucsovics fought from two sets down to help Hungary to a 3-1 victory.

"We were different players," said Fucsovics. "Right now he's just about to break in the top 10. I got more matured. I have more experience. I'm fit now, fitter than ever. I'm looking forward to playing a good match against him, try to break through finally to the quarter-finals."

Novak Djokovic set his sights on French Open glory after thrashing Mikael Ymer in the first round on Tuesday.

The Serbian, seeking to put his US Open disqualification firmly behind him, made an early statement of intent with a 6-0 6-2 6-3 victory on Court Philippe-Chatrier.

It took Djokovic one hour, 38 minutes to get the job done, with Ricardas Berankis awaiting in the second round.

And the world number one is determined to chase down a second crown at Roland Garros, having triumphed in 2016.

"I'm ready physically, mentally, emotionally to go deep in the tournament," said Djokovic.

"Hopefully I can have another successful year here in Paris. 2016 was a dream come true.

"Obviously the only French Open title I have won in my career, and it was a very long anticipated title."

 

TSITSIPAS AND RUBLEV, UNITED AGAIN BY FIVE-SETTERS

Two days after they went head to head in the Hamburg European Open final, Andrey Rublev and Stefanos Tsitsipas were back in action in Paris.

And both at one stage looked in serious danger of first-round exits, with their efforts of the past week in Germany seemingly catching up on the seeded pair.

Rublev, who got the better of Tsitsipas in Hamburg, trailed Sam Querrey by two sets on Tuesday. Tsitsipas also slumped two sets behind in his clash with Spain's Jaume Munar.

But both staged spectacular fightbacks, with Russian 13th seed Rublev edging out American Querrey 6-7 (5-7) 6-7 (4-7) 7-5 6-4 6-3 and Greek fifth seed Tsitsipas prevailing 4-6 2-6 6-1 6-4 6-4.

"Although I started well, I was kind of switched off again later during the first set," Tsitsipas said. "Whatever I was trying to do, most of my shots were landing out and nothing was going my way.

"It was crazy what was happening out there, and I couldn't find any solutions. I feel like I was just turning down the hill, and I'm happy that I took my time.

"I started thinking a little bit more. Started figuring out why I was rushing so much and why I was going for extreme things. After a bit of processing and thinking, I think that helped settle things down and have a fresh new start of the match."

Rublev accepted his display against Querrey was dismal, saying: "I was feeling completely tight. I choke another level. From the first point of the match till the last match of the match I was completely frozen. I couldn't do one step, I could only hit, I was tight like I don't know."

 

BERRETTINI FEELING OLD...AT 24!

Matteo Berrettini breezed past Vasek Pospisil 6-3 6-1 6-3 before railing against the relentless march of time.

At just 24, the Italian is already feeling like a veteran after seeing the impressive exploits of compatriots Jannik Sinner and Lorenzo Musetti, who are both teenagers.

"Now it's crazy. Until last year I was the young one," exclaimed Berrettini, who faces Lloyd Harris in round two.

"Now these two are with big steps stepping in. I mean, my career is completely different compared to theirs. They started really young.

"This is my third Roland Garros, and I'm 24. Probably them at 24, they would have played already maybe six Roland Garros. It's definitely different."

 

GASQUET AND SIMON LEAD FRENCH CASUALTIES

Canadian ninth seed Denis Shapovalov was tested by experienced Frenchman Gilles Simon but won through 6-2 7-5 5-7 6-3, while 18th-seeded Bulgarian Grigor Dimitrov drubbed another Frenchman in Gregoire Barrere, landing a 6-3 6-2 6-2 win.

Roberto Bautista Agut added to the French misery, sinking fellow veteran Richard Gasquet 7-6 (7-5) 6-2 6-1, and lesser-known players also exited their home grand slam as Ugo Humbert, Quentin Halys and Harold Mayot also bowed out.

Rafael Nadal suffered a stunning defeat to Diego Schwartzman in the Internazionali d'Italia quarter-finals - a major blow to French Open preparations for tennis' king of clay. 

A 6-2 7-5 loss to Schwartzman in Rome ended Nadal's 100 per cent record in their rivalry, after nine previous wins for the Spaniard. 

In their fifth clash on clay, and first on the surface since Nadal won in four sets in the 2018 Roland Garros quarter-finals, Schwartzman wobbled with victory in sight. 

At 5-4 ahead in the second set he was broken to love by 12-time French Open winner Nadal. 

But the eighth seed magnificently broke back immediately and then held his nerve to complete a memorable success, finishing with a volley at the net out of the reach of the stranded Nadal.

The result ends the prospect of a final between Nadal and top seed Djokovic on Monday, with Schwartzman moving on to tackle Canadian Denis Shapovalov in the last four of the tournament. 

"Today I played my best tennis. [It was] Very similar to Roland Garros against Rafa three years ago and I'm very happy," Schwartzman said in his post-match interview on court.

"I was not thinking to beat him really because I was not playing good lately. But today I did my best and I'm very happy."

There were clear mitigating circumstances behind Nadal's unusually early exit, given this is his first tournament since February. 

The 34-year-old elected to miss the resumption of tennis in the United States last month, skipping the US Open over concerns about long-haul international travel in the coronavirus period.

Shapovalov was a 6-2 3-6 6-2 winner against Bulgarian Grigor Dimitrov earlier on Saturday.

Grigor Dimitrov cruised through his Internazionali d'Italia first round clash with Gianluca Mager on Monday, while Kei Nishikori won his first game since last year's US Open. 

Fifteenth seed Dimitrov was too powerful for Italian wildcard Mager, beating him 7-5 6-1 in 74 minutes, and will face Yoshihito Nishioka or Generali Open winner Miomir Kecmanovic in the next round. 

Nishikori, who has suffered with injury over the past 12 months, overcame Albert Ramos-Vinolas 6-4 7-6 (7-3) and could face three-time Grand Slam champion Stan Wawrinka if he defeats Lorenzo Musetti on Tuesday.

"I'm very happy to win," Nishikori said. "I think winning is most important for now. I need to get a lot of confidence. It's been a long time since the US Open last year. It isn't perfect yet, but hopefully one by one I'll get better.

"I tried to be aggressive when I could. He hits a lot of topspin balls, so it's not easy, but I tried to have good defence and good offence."

Hubert Hurkacz dumped out Great Britain's Dan Evans in three sets, while Marin Cilic overcame Alexander Bublik 6-7(7-4), 6-2, 6-4 to set up a meeting with sixth seed David Goffin. 

Seeds Felix Auger-Aliassime and Karen Khachanov, meanwhile, slipped to defeats to Filip Krajinovic and Casper Ruud respectively. 

The second round will see top seeds Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal in action after they were handed first-round byes.

Andy Murray's return at the US Open ended in the second round, while Daniil Medvedev's strong form continued on Thursday.

In singles action at a grand slam for the first time since the 2019 Australian Open, Murray produced a gutsy win in his opener, but fell in the second round in a rainy New York.

The three-time grand slam champion was joined by Milos Raonic and Grigor Dimitrov in exiting the major, which is being played behind closed doors at Flushing Meadows.

Medvedev, meanwhile, continued to cruise, while Dominic Thiem was also untroubled.

 

MURRAY BOWS OUT

Murray fought hard but was sent packing by Felix Auger-Aliassime, the Canadian 15th seed recording a 6-2 6-3 6-4 win.

Auger-Aliassime was in impressive form on Arthur Ashe Stadium, hitting 52 winners and just 30 unforced errors.

Murray needed more than four and a half hours to get past Yoshihito Nishioka in the opening round, but Auger-Aliassime was too good.

The 20-year-old lost just 14 points on serve for the match, winning in two hours, seven minutes.

MEDVEDEV, THIEM EASE THROUGH

 

Medvedev is yet to drop a set at the grand slam after brushing past Australian Christopher O'Connell 6-3 6-2 6-4.

The Russian third seed and last year's runner-up was satisfied with his performance as he mixed 32 winners with 31 unforced errors.

"It was great. It was a great match. Nothing special but really happy to win in three sets," Medvedev said.

"I didn't lose my serve, which is always important. Managed to break early in the second and third set, and first set was, I think, under control also.

"Happy to be through, and let's see what the next rounds will give us."

Up next for Medvedev is J.J. Wolf, the American 21-year-old recording a 6-2 6-4 6-3 win over Roberto Carballes Baena in the second round.

Thiem, the three-time grand slam runner-up and second seed, cruised past Sumit Nagal 6-3 6-3 6-2 on his 27th birthday.

A tougher test is awaiting the Austrian, who will meet Marin Cilic after the 2014 champion beat Norbert Gombos 6-3 1-6 7-6 (7-2) 7-5.

 

RAONIC, DIMITROV STUNNED

Having reached the Western & Southern Open final, Raonic looked in fine form in the United States.

However, the 25th seed fell in the second round, losing to fellow Canadian Vasek Pospisil 6-7 (1-7) 6-3 7-6 (7-4) 6-3.

Dimitrov, the 14th seed, also exited, edged by Marton Fucsovics 6-7 (5-7) 7-6 (7-4) 3-6 6-4 6-1 after four hours, 50 minutes.

But last year's semi-finalist Matteo Berrettini is embarking on another run, the Italian sixth seed beating Ugo Humbert 6-4 6-4 7-6 (8-6).

Roberto Bautista Agut, Andrey Rublev, Karen Khachanov, Alex de Minaur and Casper Ruud also advanced on what was another good day for male seeds.

Tennis had a rotten lockdown but now the professional tours are emerging from hibernation. 

The men must wait a fortnight, but in Sicily a number of leading women will, from Monday, take part in the Palermo Open, a minor clay-court event that will face scrutiny like it has never known before. 

Tennis must prove it can stage events responsibly, not least because the sport's reputation took a hit with the calamitous ad hoc Adria Tour. That event saw stars including men's world number one Novak Djokovic, whose brainchild it was, and Grigor Dimitrov hit by coronavirus. 

The ATP and the WTA, governing bodies of the men's and women's tours respectively, will apply stringent rules and demand impeccable player compliance over the coming months. 

They have already seen tennis wiped out in China for the rest of the year, on top of Wimbledon's cancellation, and can ill afford any further momentous setbacks. 

At the end of August, the US Open is due to begin at Flushing Meadows, a behind-closed-doors grand slam.

But with a number of leading players already opting out or showing reluctance to travel during the pandemic period, it would be easier to return a barrage of John Isner serves than to accurately figure how the rest of the tennis year pans out. 

Sicily for starters

Palermo organisers expected Simona Halep, the world number two and reigning Wimbledon champion, to join them, and it was with "great bitterness" that they acknowledged the news she would be staying at home in Romania. 

Halep cited rising COVID-19 cases in her home country and her own "anxieties around international air travel". 

Jelena Ostapenko, Johanna Konta and Svetlana Kuznetsova were among others to pull out, with a number of factors behind the loss of a host of the event's star attractions. 

Arguably, though, the standard of the tennis in the week ahead will pale into insignificance against the success of the tournament from a health and safety perspective. 

One player tested positive for coronavirus after arriving in Palermo, organisers said on Saturday, and was kept away from all others, withdrawing from the tournament. 

The eyes of the tennis world will focus on the modest ASD Country Time Club, not least because a small number of tennis fans will also be allowed entry. 

American trilogy

Can the United States, where over 150,000 have died with coronavirus, provide safe haven for the biggest stars in tennis later this month? 

Authorities are optimistic ahead of a disrupted US hard-court swing getting under way, but there can be no guarantees, despite best efforts. There are three major tournaments in the US in August, each brimming with the biggest names in the game. 

A new WTA event in Kentucky was announced in mid-July, and starts on August 10, with a field boasting Serena Williams, Venus Williams, Sloane Stephens and Coco Gauff.  

From Kentucky, the best women's players in the world will head to New York for the Western and Southern Open, relocated to Flushing Meadows from Cincinnati this year in a move to save the tournament. 

That event, scheduled to run from August 21 to 28, is where the elite men make their re-entrance, with no ATP events scheduled until then. 

And the following week sees the US Open get under way at the same venue - all being well. 

Players will be expected to keep to their tournament bubbles throughout, tests will be carried out and players closely monitored. Any slip-ups could spell peril. 

Who's coming back? Who's not?

Halep is skipping Palermo and as of Sunday, August 2, she was not listed for the Western and Southern Open; however, she may play an event in Prague, starting on August 10. 

Given Halep's clear travel concerns, it would be little surprise were she to skip the US Open, which is a decision world number one Ash Barty has already taken. Barty's fellow Australian, Nick Kyrgios, has also chosen not to travel to the United States. 

Great Britain's Andy Murray, who appears keen to head to the States, has suggested a number of leading male players will swerve the US tournaments, yet the likes of Rafael Nadal, Djokovic and Dominic Thiem have entered the Western and Southern Open. 

Any of those players could still pull out, Nadal having notably expressed misgivings about international travel during lockdown. 

But will the temptation to go after another grand slam title at the US Open prove too alluring? Nadal is just one behind Roger Federer's record haul of 20 men's singles slams, with Djokovic having 17 majors to his name. 

Federer is sitting out all this drama, having undergone season-ending knee surgery. 

It comes as no surprise to see Serena Williams, one short of Margaret Court's women's record of 24 singles slams, committing fully to the weeks ahead. 

With no Barty and perhaps no Halep, Williams, who turns 39 next month, may perhaps never have a better opportunity to draw level with Court.

Grigor Dimitrov admitted he was still dealing with the effects of coronavirus after testing positive for COVID-19 last month.

The three-time grand slam semi-finalist was one of several players to contract coronavirus at the Adria Tour, with Novak Djokovic among them.

Dimitrov, 29, played at the Ultimate Tennis Showdown (UTS) on Saturday and Sunday, suffering losses to Richard Gasquet and Feliciano Lopez.

The Bulgarian later revealed he was still feeling the impact of contracting COVID-19.

"I'm just trying to put in effort every single day," he told Tennis Majors.

"Even if I'm tired or not, to keep progressing. One day I feel really well and I have about four hours to be out, but then all of a sudden I need to completely shut down to take a nap or just rest.

"I have to go through that process as much as possible. Hopefully I'm going to recover fully."

Dimitrov, the world number 19, said he was grateful to be playing again after his initial struggle with coronavirus.

"I guess it [COVID-19] is different for everyone. I was not breathing well. I was tired. I had no taste, no smell," he said.

"Everything you could possibly think of. It was no fun. To be honest, I'm lucky to be on the court right now.

"I don't take each day for granted. I really appreciate being here. It's so nice that during time off you can come out and play with your competitors."

There have been more than 16 million confirmed cases of coronavirus worldwide, with the death toll exceeding 650,000.

The ATP Tour season was suspended in March and is scheduled to restart next month.

Dan Evans believes Novak Djokovic set "a poor example" with the Adria Tour and hopes it does not lead to plans to hold the US Open being reconsidered.

Djokovic was the driving force behind the event that drew huge crowds in Serbia and Croatia before the Zadar final between the world number one and Andrey Rublev was cancelled after Grigor Dimitrov tested positive for COVID-19.

Borna Coric subsequently revealed he had also contracted coronavirus, while it is reported Dimitrov's coach Christian Groh and Djokovic's fitness trainer Marko Paniki have caught the virus too.

Evans criticised the "total disregard" of social distancing measures, with players pictured dancing together at nightclubs and making contact while playing basketball.

He said: "I just think it is a poor example to set. Even if the guidelines in that country are not two metres, I think we should all… it is not a joke, is it?

"Even if the guidelines were taken away in this country [the United Kingdom] to normal I would still be trying to keep myself out of the way as much as I could from other people. And I just think there has been a total disregard to that.

"It is very unfortunate that Grigor has it, Coric has it but, you know, if you strip it back, is it a surprise? I think that is the question we should all ask.

"I think we could definitely learn from that. And hopefully that event doesn't take away from… now the US Open, I hope there is no second-guessing now on the US Open because of unfortunate events."

Asked whether Djokovic should consider his position as president of the ATP Player Council, Evans said: "I don't know. Honestly, when I sit in those meetings, I don't know how it really works and how they get to those positions.

"But, put it this way, I don't think you should be having a players' party and dancing all over each other and then, two very good tennis players have tested positive, you should feel some responsibility in this event and how it has transpired."

The ATP Tour has been suspended since March but is slated to return with the Citi Open on August 14.

The Western and Southern Open will follow ahead of the start of the US Open on August 31.

Tournaments will be played with either reduced fans in attendance or behind closed doors.

Borna Coric confirmed he has coronavirus just a day after the Adria Tour final was cancelled due to Grigor Dimitrov's positive test.

Sunday's match between Novak Djokovic and Andrey Rublev was called off after Dimitrov announced he had tested positive for COVID-19.

The world number 19 had played in the Serbian and Croatian legs of the exhibition tournament and lost in straight sets to Coric in Zadar on Saturday before returning home after feeling unwell.

In a Twitter post on Monday, Coric said: "Hi everyone, I wanted to inform you all that I tested positive for COVID-19.

"I want to make sure anyone who has been in contact with me during the last few days gets tested!

"I am really sorry for any harm I might have caused! I'm feeling well and don't have any symptoms.

"Please stay safe and healthy! Lots of love to all!"

Australian Nick Kyrgios responded to Coric's Twitter post to slam the decision to hold the event.

"Boneheaded decision to go ahead with the 'exhibition' speedy recovery fellas, but that's what happens when you disregard all protocols. This IS NOT A JOKE," he wrote.

The tournament, set up by Djokovic as a means of helping top players return to fitness after the ATP Tour was suspended due to the pandemic, attracted thousands of fans in Serbia and Croatia, where lockdown measures were being eased.

Professional tennis has been largely at a standstill since March, with the French Open pushed back to September, Wimbledon cancelled and the US Open set to be staged without fans and under strict health and safety protocols from August 31.

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