Patrick Cover of the USA won the 52nd Alacran Jamaica Open on Saturday, posting a five-under-par 67 and a three-day score of 12- for the tournament held at Tryall Golf Club in Hanover for the first time. 

Friday the 13th appeared to be shaping as the beginning of the end of the United States' Presidents Cup dominance. Two days later, their class came to the fore.

Trailing the Internationals 4-1 at Royal Melbourne Golf Club following the opening day's four-ball contests, the USA found themselves behind in every foursomes matchup on Friday.

They were facing a staggering 9-1 deficit before the momentum swung and the session was somehow split thanks to clutch putts from Justin Thomas and Patrick Cantlay.

The USA's 6.5 - 3.5 deficit became 9-5 after Saturday morning's four-ball, but with the talent in their team, they could always look ahead to 12 singles matchups.

Thomas and Rickie Fowler may have coughed up a 5up lead in the foursomes later on Saturday, but the USA were back to within 10-8 and in position for an eighth straight title.

Playing captain Tiger Woods had taken the risk of not playing himself on Saturday despite two wins on the opening two days.

That gamble paid off, the show of faith in his team – and his ability to lead by example on a decisive day – proving crucial.

The USA grabbed a record-equalling eight points in the singles, Woods' 3 and 2 win over Abraham Ancer – the Internationals' best player of the week – setting the tone.

Of the 12 singles matches, the USA had a higher ranked player in 11. The other was world number 24 Matt Kuchar, who halved his match with the 20th-ranked Louis Oosthuizen.

Internationals captain Ernie Els appeared to accept some responsibility for the defeat despite being proud of his team, but his work on the opening days helped set up what would have been a major upset.

His team led 10-8 after his pairings, but the USA's class eventually prevailed in the singles.

The Internationals were left with a sense of what might have been, given the position they worked so hard to put themselves in.

Royal Melbourne was the scene of their only Presidents Cup triumph 21 years ago, and it seemed set to be where the drought would be broken.

But just as Friday the 13th looked set to be unlucky for the USA, it proved to be for the Internationals, Woods and his team showing their class exactly when they needed to.

Matt Kuchar and Tony Finau hailed the "greatest" ever Tiger Woods after the superstar helped inspire an eighth consecutive Presidents Cup for the United States.

The USA made history after rallying to beat the Internationals 16-14 in a thrilling finish at Royal Melbourne Golf Club on Sunday.

Trailing 10-8 before the start of the deciding singles, no team had won the Presidents Cup after being down after three days, but the USA - led by playing captain Woods - changed that.

The USA claimed a record-equalling eight points on Sunday, while Woods surpassed Phil Mickelson for the most Presidents Cup matches won after easing past Abraham Ancer in Melbourne.

While it was a collective effort, the star-studded USA team showered Woods in praise, with the 15-time major champion flawless throughout the 13th edition of the event.

Speaking with a large grin on his face, Kuchar told reporters: "It was pretty awesome to play for the greatest player ever. To have a chance to make a team captained by the greatest player ever that is also a player on the team. 

"I can't tell you how unique, how cool of a thing that is, to not only play for him, but alongside of him. And so for us, you know, to be in a hole, to come back and win this thing was such a thrill. One, to win it as a team, but to do it with Tiger Woods as our captain was just a huge thrill."

"It was really cool being part of this team and having Tiger as captain in that you get Tiger to speak up a little more," Kuchar added. "I think a lot of our teams as a player, you let the captain captain and the players play, and to get Tiger to speak up, I mean, we had a room full of some of the greatest golfers in the world, and when he speaks, we all listen. It was awesome to be a part of.

"I think all of us will look back and have these pictures hanging on our walls and say, we played for and alongside Tiger Woods, the greatest player ever. It was awesome. And to have him take that role, take that mantle as captain, was great fun to be part of."

Finau, who came from 4down to tie with Hideki Matsuyama, said: "Tiger, the story of his resilience, coming back from what he has with injuries and everything that he's been through, I think each of us, we just believe in each other because we know we could do what we did today, and we really believed that we could win the cup.

"We were kind of against the odds, but I couldn't give up on my team-mates and my captains and I know everybody on this team felt the same way. But we are very inspired to play for Tiger, with Tiger, and it's so satisfying to win this cup because of that. I think we all believe in each other and we were able to get the job done for our captain and playing captain."

The Internationals were seeking their first Presidents Cup title since they triumphed in Melbourne in 1998. Woods was on that losing team 21 years ago.

"I've been a part of teams before where we have won," Woods said. "Also been a part of, unfortunately, this Presidents Cup when we lost 21 years ago, and so to come here and to do it in this fashion, to do it with this team, in particular, it was an honour for me as a player and even more of an honour to be their captain."

Woods showed plenty of emotion as the USA maintained their stranglehold on the Presidents Cup and he told a news conference: "I've cried in pretty much every cup we've won. I've been doing this a long time. Any time you have moments where you're able to do something that is bigger than us as an individual, is so much more meaningful and so much more special."

International captain Ernie Els expressed pride with his young team after they almost upstaged "one of the greatest golf teams of all time" at the Presidents Cup.  

Els' Internationals were unable to maintain their 10-8 lead in Sunday's singles, beaten 16-14 by defending champions the United States in Melbourne.

It was a USA onslaught at Royal Melbourne Golf Club, where Tiger Woods' team scored a record-equalling eight points to prevent the Internationals from claiming a first Presidents Cup since 1998.

The USA became the first team in history to win the Presidents Cup after trailing prior to the final round as the Internationals threatened to dethrone their star-studded opponents.

Despite falling short, Els - whose team featured seven debutants - told a news conference: "It's been an incredible week…The players were just incredible. They were open for a new formula, so to speak, and embraced what I said to them, and you know, here we are. You know, we lost 16-14, and we've got to swallow that.

"But great strides were made, especially in our team play. I really felt that our team play was really the core of our team, and that never was. We never felt like we could play foursomes or four-ball together as a team. We did that well.

"Before the week started, we had a plan to get to 10 points by Saturday evening. So that's why we were so excited yesterday, losing 3-1, because we knew we got to 10 points. I could have made different choices in the singles today. I can take it on my shoulders. It is what it is.

"The questions will come from you guys and the public that I made mistakes in the selection of where I put my players, but I followed a plan from 100 per cent, and it didn't quite work out, but we came damn close.

"I think the US team, and I think you guys, and I think the people around the world will look at these guys in a different way. I think you guys have seen what can happen. If you compare our team on paper with other teams in other sport, you would have laughed us out of the building. But we gave it a hell of a go and we came mightily close to winning and upsetting one of the greatest golf teams of all time.

"If you look at their record and where these guys are at the moment, they are going places; I can tell you that. We do have major champion winners up here. We do have number ones, former number ones, but we also have had guys playing for the first time, and I can only see their future going in a great manner.

"It was wonderful serving with them, and it's going to be tough. We've got to fly a long ways to get home. It's going to be tough to swallow but we do have a great sense of humour in our team. It won't be long before you see the music or hear the music playing in our team room. Nobody died out there, and it was a sport, and we gave it our all. So, so be it."

Tiger Woods described the United States' comeback as "amazing" after the defending champions mounted a historic rally to retain the Presidents Cup.

The USA became the first team to win the Presidents Cup after trailing the Internationals heading into the final day thanks to a stunning fightback in Melbourne on Sunday.

Led by Woods, the USA clinched eight points in the singles for a 16-14 triumph and an eighth consecutive success, having been down 10-8 by the close of play on Saturday.

Playing captain Woods - who broke the record for most Presidents Cup wins with 27, surpassing Phil Mickelson - said: "We did it together. We came here as a team. My team-mates and my boys all played well. 

"The captains did an amazing job of just being there for every little detail. I couldn't have done it without all their help and all my boys. They did it."

"It's been one of the more amazing challenges, but you know, Stricks [Steve Stricker] and Coups [Fred Couples] and Zach [Johnson], they were amazing," 15-time major champion Woods added.

"All the guys, they believed in one another. We relied on one another as a team and we did it together."

Woods sat out Saturday's four-ball and foursomes but returned to lead-off the USA on Sunday, setting the tone with a comprehensive 3 and 2 victory against Abraham Ancer.

"I trust all my 11 guys. I trust them implicitly; I told them from the very get go. They went out there and got the points we needed. We fought," Woods continued.

"Even the points we lost, we were making them earn every one of them, and this cup wasn't going to be given to us. We had to go earn it, and we did."

It was a case of so close but yet so far for Ernie Els' International team, who were dreaming of a first Presidents Cup success since 1998.

The Internationals stormed out of the blocks with a 4-1 lead after the opening day and they maintained that advantage until the USA flipped the script on its head on Sunday.

Captain Els, whose team included a number of debutants, was emotional afterwards.

"I can only give them my love," Els said. "They tried so hard. They played so hard for each other and the team, and to buy into something new like I tried, I really have to take my hat off to every one of them. 

"There are a lot of young, young players, a lot of players that the world has never seen or heard but you will see them a lot in the future. I have admiration for my guys and the caddies and the wives, it's been fantastic."

Els added: "You're going to make me cry now. I just love these guys. We've spent all week together and all year together with all the meetings we've had, and them buying into all the stuff that I came up with, and they were 100 per cent in, and I was 100 per cent with them. It was a collective effort of just great people, the wives, the caddies, PGA Tour staff, everybody worked together on this one.

"We didn't get the result we wanted, but we got 10 points in four sections of team play, and that means the team building was a success."

The United States completed a record comeback to clinch an eighth consecutive Presidents Cup at the expense of the Internationals following a lopsided singles session.

No team had ever won the Presidents Cup after trailing at the start of the final round, with Tiger Woods' USA 10-8 adrift of the Internationals heading into the deciding day in Melbourne.

But the USA made history as they sensationally rallied past Ernie Els' Internationals in Sunday's singles for a 16-14 win at Royal Melbourne Golf Club.

The Internationals, who were dreaming of a first Presidents Cup since 1998 having kept the USA at bay for three days, had to win the final three matches just to tie the 13th edition of the tournament in a tense finale.

However, the Internationals could only manage one as the USA collected eight points - a joint singles record - to defy the odds and see off the challenge. 

Woods wanted to lead from the front after teeing off for the USA in the opening match of 12 singles, and the record-breaking American did just that.

Having watched from the sidelines on Saturday, playing captain Woods produced another masterclass to blitz Abraham Ancer 3 and 2.

Woods, the youngest captain at 43, made it three wins from three at this year's event to surpass Phil Mickelson for most Presidents Cup match victories with 27 in total.

That set the tone for the USA as Dustin Johnson followed suit by collecting another point to level the Presidents Cup at 10-10 - the former world number one easing past Li Haotong 4 and 3.

Red continued to dominate the leaderboard as American villain Patrick Reed broke through for his first win of the tournament. Without his usual caddie following a fan altercation on Saturday, Reed steamrolled C.T. Pan 4 and 2 thanks to eight birdies.

A tough day for the Internationals saw Hideki Matsuyama squander a 4up lead to tie with Tony Finau, though they finally got on the board courtesy of Im Sung-jae, who took down U.S. Open champion Gary Woodland 4 and 3.

Cameron Smith put some wind into the Internationals' sails with a gritty 2 and 1 victory against star Justin Thomas, but victories from Patrick Cantlay (3 and 2 over Joaquin Niemann), Xander Schauffele (2 and 1 over Adam Scott) and Webb Simpson (2 and 1 over Byeong Hun An) proved too difficult to overcome.

Matt Kuchar went 1up on the 17th hole to guarantee a USA victory and spark wild celebrations among the team, Woods becoming a first-time winning captain.

The United States claimed their eighth consecutive Presidents Cup after becoming the first team to win the tournament when trailing at the start of the final day.

 

Tiger Woods made more history by breaking a record at the Presidents Cup on Sunday.

The 15-time major champion surpassed Phil Mickelson for most match wins in the tournament's history with his 27th.

Woods proved too good for Abraham Ancer 3 and 2 at Royal Melbourne Golf Club as the United States neared a comeback win over the Internationals.

We take a look at some of his numbers at the Presidents Cup.

27 - Woods has 27 match wins, surpassing Mickelson's mark of 26.

12 - Of his wins, 12 have come in the foursomes format, with eight in the four-ball and seven in the singles.

7 - His seven singles wins is also a record.

15 - Woods has suffered 15 defeats in his Presidents Cup career.

2 - He will finish the 2019 Presidents Cup with a 3-0-0 record, marking just the second time he has gone undefeated, having also done so in 2009 when he went 5-0-0.

1998 - Woods' first Presidents Cup victory came 21 years ago, when he combined with Fred Couples for a 5 and 4 foursomes win over Ernie Els and Vijay Singh.

Patrick Reed was pleased to have silenced the Presidents Cup crowd with his first victory in Melbourne amid ongoing backlash.  

Reed has endured a tumultuous time at Royal Melbourne Golf Club, where fans have heckled the controversial United States golfer and his caddie clashed with a supporter.

Fans have made their feelings known after Reed was accused of cheating at last week's Hero World Challenge, while the PGA Tour suspended caddie Kessler Karain on Saturday after an altercation.

But 2018 Masters champion Reed finally had reason to celebrate after outclassing International golfer C.T. Pan 4 and 2 in Sunday's singles following three consecutive defeats.

Reed, who posted eight birdies in a brilliant performance, said: "You make birdies, you don't hear much. The biggest thing today, which I felt like I didn't do early on this week, was we didn't get up in our matches. We didn't get up on top.

"When you're not up in your matches, the other team, the crowd will get more vocal. If you get up in your match, the crowd will be pretty quiet. I was able to do that and silence a couple."

"I think the biggest thing is just to continue grinding and not let the crowds or let people get in the way of what you're trying to do, and that's play golf," added Reed, who was 6up through seven against Pan.

"The past couple days were tough, and today still wasn't easy. I played some amazing golf, and even though I got up a lot early, C.T., the kind of golfer he is, he put the pressure right back on. He made clutch putt after clutch putt, and kept making birdies to keep the round interesting."

Tiger Woods broke the record for the most matches won in Presidents Cup history on Sunday.

United States playing captain Woods outclassed International opponent Abraham Ancer 3 and 2 in the deciding singles session for his 27th victory.

American superstar Woods equalled Phil Mickelson's all-time record in Friday's foursomes at Royal Melbourne Golf Club, where he has remained perfect this week with three wins.

Woods - a 15-time major winner - has put defending champions the USA on track for an eighth consecutive Presidents Cup title.

Defending champions the United States are charging towards an unprecedented Presidents Cup comeback, though the Internationals continue to dig deep in Melbourne. 

Down 10-8 prior to Sunday's deciding singles, the USA faced an uphill battle to claim an eighth consecutive title as no team had ever trailed after three sessions and won the Presidents Cup.

However, the USA are on track to sensationally retain their crown, with Tiger Woods' team up in six of the 12 matches and projected to triumph 15.5 - 14.5 at Royal Melbourne Golf Club.

First out against Abraham Ancer, Woods returned for the singles showdown after sitting out on Saturday and the 15-time major champion has led the way in more overcast conditions.

Woods - who can break the record for most matches won at the Presidents Cup - leads Ancer 3up through 15 holes.

Controversial American Patrick Reed - without his usual caddie following a fan altercation on Saturday - birdied five of his opening seven holes in a remarkable start to his day against C.T. Pan.

The USA's Tony Finau has also mounted a remarkable comeback, rallying from 4down through 10 to be level with Hideki Matsuyama after 14.

Following three consecutive losses, 2018 champion Reed is 2up, having been 6up after seven holes, while compatriot Dustin Johnson is 4up over Li Haotong.

The Internationals - eyeing a first title since 1998 - are ahead in three matches thanks to Louis Oosthuizen, Im Sung-jae and Joaquin Niemann.

Controversial United States golfer Patrick Reed is dialled in on the final day of the Presidents Cup, despite the absence of his caddie in Melbourne.

Reed teed off in Sunday's singles without usual right-hand man Kessler Karain, who was suspended by the PGA Tour following a fan altercation on Saturday.

But after a forgettable first three days amid cheating allegations and heckles at Royal Melbourne Golf Club, 2018 Masters champion Reed is finally enjoying some success.

Reed - coming off three straight defeats - birdied five of his opening seven holes to race out to a commanding 6up lead against International opponent C.T. Pan.

American Reed birdied his first three holes and the sixth as the USA - trailing 10-8 at the start of play - eye their eighth consecutive Presidents Cup.

Kevin Kirk is caddying for Reed, who has endured a tough week at the 13th Presidents Cup.

Reed has been public enemy number one in Australia after his two-stroke penalty during last week's Hero World Challenge in the Bahamas.

Already a maligned figure on the PGA Tour, Reed was penalised for improving his lie in the bunker, hitting the sand twice during his practice swings, sparking controversy and claims of cheating.

Booed on day one, Reed taunted the Melbourne crowd on Friday by mimicking a shovelling motion, before tensions boiled over on Saturday.

Karain clashed with a fan after he had "had enough" of the heckling of Reed, before the Tour ultimately intervened.

There is plenty on the line as the United States and the International team go head-to-head on the final day of the Presidents Cup.

The USA are eyeing their eighth consecutive Presidents Cup title, but the defending champions must overturn a 10-8 deficit in Sunday's singles in Melbourne, where fans are queuing up in large numbers at Royal Melbourne Golf Club.

No team have trailed after three sessions and won the Presidents Cup, with Ernie Els' Internationals - leading since the opening day - looking to clinch their first crown since 1998 - a triumph also in Melbourne 21 years ago.

After the Internationals managed to preserve their lead in a dramatic finish to Saturday's foursomes, USA captain Tiger Woods has returned for the singles.

Woods sat out both sessions on Saturday - the four-ball and foursomes - but the 15-time major champion is back with club in hand against Abraham Ancer in the opening match.

It could be a historic day for Woods, who can set the record for most matches won at the Presidents Cup, having tied Phil Mickelson's tally of 26 on Friday.

Meanwhile, controversial American Patrick Reed is without caddie Kessler Karain for the third match against C.T. Pan following a fan altercation on Saturday.

Five pairs were tied for the lead after the second round of the QBE Shootout as Bubba Watson and Charles Howell's 66 saw them move into contention.

Harold Varner and Ryan Palmer equalled the tournament's lowest round on Friday with a 17-under 55 to take a two-shot lead through 18 holes, yet they had company at the top after Saturday's round.

Having made gains at 16 of the 18 holes in the first round, Varner and Palmer had three bogeys on Saturday at the event in Naples, Florida.

Watson and Howell had a blemish-free round and back-to-back birdies at 17 and 18 saw them reach 19 under par through 36 holes, the same score as Varner and Palmer and three other pairs.

Brendon Todd and Billy Horschel, Jason Kokrak and JT Poston and Kevin Tway and Rory Sabbatini were the other duos that had a share of the lead.

Ian Poulter and Graeme McDowell managed to record the joint-lowest round of the day, though, following up their 61 with a 65 on Saturday.

Four birdies in five holes between the fourth and eighth helped them reach 18 under par for the tournament, one shot back ahead of Sunday's third and final round.

Tiger Woods accused the Royal Melbourne crowd of going "over the top" after a wild third day at the Presidents Cup.

The Internationals head into Sunday's singles with a 10-8 advantage over Woods' United States team, but the day was notable for a crowd disturbance that led to Patrick Reed's caddie being suspended for the rest of the event.

Kessler Karain was involved in an altercation with a fan after Reed and his partner Webb Simpson lost to Hideki Matsuyama and C.T. Pan in the morning four-balls.

Karain admitted he had "had enough" of the hostility shown towards Reed, who has played the role of pantomime villain this week after arriving in Australia on the back of accusations of cheating during the Hero World Challenge.

The caddie told Fore Play: "Riding on the cart, a guy was about three feet from Patrick and said, 'you f****** suck.' I got off the cart and shoved him, said a couple things, probably a few expletives.

"Security came and I got back in the cart and left. I don't think there's one caddie I know that could blame me."

Woods, who will go out first on Sunday before taking over his captaincy duties, felt alcohol had played a part in the incident and asked for a more respectful approach on the final day.

Asked how the atmosphere compared to a Ryder Cup, the US captain said: "Well, I think it's different. There aren't as many people at this venue because it's so small, a lot of bottlenecks.

"There's obviously some yelling. There's people who have had a lot to drink and have gone over the top.

"I've heard it. I've been in the groups playing when it has happened, and I've been inside the ropes as a captain witnessing it.

"Bipartisanship is part of playing in team matches, whether you're home or on the road, it's part of the deal. As long as the fans are respectful, all we ask is for them to be respectful.

"Hopefully they will be excited [about] Sunday and the matches and be very respectful of all the players."

Woods' Internationals counterpart Ernie Els felt the galleries were "pretty quiet" compared to New York in 2017 and that the Americans should "take it and move on".

The South African said: "I've played in many Presidents Cups. I've played in the US many times. If you look back at New York and how these players were treated in New York, this crowd is pretty quiet.

"I mean, we just get treated the same wherever you go as an away game, there's some heckling going on and we all know that, and you prepare for that, and that's just the way it goes.

"We shut up and we get on with things. That's what we did in New York. So it's part of the game.

"And I'm with Tiger; I'm against heckling. I'm against crowds being disrespectful to the players, but it happens. We as professionals, we move on.

"I think Tiger is one of the ultimate professionals that's ever played the game. I've played with him where he's been heckled in US Opens and a lot of other places. He's taken it on the chin and he's moved forward. He's been an example.

"Same has happened to me. It's happened to a lot of players. But I must say, this Aussie crowd, okay, they got a little bit boisterous this afternoon with a couple of beers, but which crowd doesn't. You take it and you move on."

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