San Antonio Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich said he prefers Adam Silver's leadership to that of United States president Donald Trump.

Popovich was responding to criticism from Trump, who blasted the Spurs coach and Golden State Warriors counterpart Steve Kerr last week for their responses to questions about the NBA-China controversy.

Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey issued an apology for a now-deleted tweet, that read "Fight for freedom, stand with Hong Kong" amid the ongoing protests in the region.

While Popovich and Kerr unwilling to discuss the matter, NBA president Silver drew praise for his response after saying the league was "apologetic" but added that "we are not apologising for Daryl exercising his freedom of expression".

Popovich – who has been critical of Trump in the past – told reporters prior to the Spurs' 123-114 preseason loss to the New Orleans Pelicans on Sunday: "[Silver] stood by our nation and its principles. That's pretty huge in these days.

"Sometimes, it's kind of Orwellian. You think we're living in a place where, 'Is this really happening?' But that comparison was pretty stark when you put our president up against those leaders when he's with them or talking to him and how he reacts compared to the way Adam Silver reacted. I was proud of him. It was great."

Asked about Trump's comments, Popovich added: "All I did was make a comparison between Adam Silver's show of principle and courage in a tough situation, as opposed to how our president reacts when in the company of authoritarian figures, whether it's Saudi Arabia, North Korea, Russia or Turkey, whatever it is.

"It comes off as really feckless, impotent, cowardly by comparison."

Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr said superstar Stephen Curry is ready to have a great season in the NBA.

Following the departure of Kevin Durant in free agency and Klay Thompson's knee injury in the NBA Finals in June, all eyes are on Curry for the 2019-20 campaign.

Kerr spoke with media after Golden State's practice on Sunday and was asked if Curry will be tasked to do more this season in the wake of Durant's departure and Thompson's injury.

"Just the usual," Kerr said. "I'm not looking for anything different than what he's done for five years, but what he's done is pretty special: two MVPs and a perennial top-five player."

Kerr went on to say Curry's had an "incredible camp" so far and thinks the two-time MVP is in position for a special season.

"To me, he's at his peak physically, mentally," Kerr said. "He's seen every defense that people have thrown at him now during his career, and he's ready to have a great year.

"He's in his prime age-wise, strength and conditioning-wise and defensively he's seen everything that's come his way... So he's kind of in his sweet spot right now, and he has been the last couple years. And hopefully that continues for the next few years."

While Thompson is not expected to return to the team until at least February or March, Curry will not need to bear too much of a burden as the Warriors signed former Brooklyn Nets guard D'Angelo Russell to a four-year, $117million contract during free agency.

"It's just the natural way of our offense and how we play," Curry said. "I'm going to have the ball in my hands a lot more. Just got to make the right plays, be confident, aggressive, assertive every possession." 

"Steph's smart," Kerr added. "And he realises what we've lost in the last couple of years from a veteran leadership standpoint. So he understands he's got more responsibility in that regard now."

The Warriors visit the Los Angeles Lakers for a preseason matchup on Monday, before Golden State open the regular season against the Los Angeles Clippers on October 24.

United States president Donald Trump blasted Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr and San Antonio Spurs boss Gregg Popovich for their responses to questions about the NBA-China controversy.

Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey issued an apology on Sunday for a now-deleted tweet, that read "Fight for freedom, stand with Hong Kong" amid the ongoing protests in the region.

The issue has highlighted the NBA's relationship with China, which Kerr was noncommittal about on Monday when asked about the fallout from Morey.

Kerr and Popovich have been highly critical of Trump in the past and the country's leader was scathing of the NBA coaches.

"I watched this guy, Steve Kerr, and he was like a little boy who was so scared to be even answering the question," Trump told reporters Wednesday when asked about Kerr's refusal to discuss the issue.

"He couldn't answer the question. He was shaking. 'Oh, I don't know. I don't know.' He didn't know how to answer the question. And yet he'll talk about the United States very badly."

On Popovich – who was also reluctant to discuss the issue of protests in Hong Kong – Trump said: "I watched Popovich. Sort of the same thing, but he didn't look quite as scared actually.

"But they talk badly about the United States, but when it talks about China, they don't want to say anything bad. I thought it was pretty sad actually. It'll be very interesting."

Trump added: "I watch the way that Kerr and Popovich and some of the others were pandering to China, and yet to our own country, it's like they don't respect it.

"It's like they don't respect it. I said, 'What a difference – isn't it sad?' It's very sad. To me, it's very sad."

Made aware of Trump's comments about Kerr, Warriors superstar Stephen Curry – who has also been critical of the US president – replied: "welcome Steve to the club".

Draymond Green said there is a lack of familiarity at the Golden State Warriors as the NBA Finals runners-up work on their chemistry following roster changes.

It has been a busy offseason for the Warriors after going down to the Toronto Raptors in the Finals, losing All-Star Kevin Durant to the Brooklyn Nets via free agency.

Veterans Andre Iguodala (traded to the Memphis Grizzlies) and Shaun Livingston (retired) also departed as the Warriors acquired D'Angelo Russell and a number of young recruits.

With the Warriors eyeing a sixth successive trip to the Finals, star Green spoke to reporters after Friday's practice and said: "A lot different. But it's fun, though.

"Just the lack of familiarity. You get used to a certain thing for so long, and then it's not that. The normal reads that you would make, just kind of second nature, you got to make sure they're there.

"It's just a lot more making sure everyone's on the same page, or getting there. Everybody's not on the same page, which is to be expected, so just getting everybody there is the difference."

Green, who will lead the way alongside Stephen Curry as Klay Thompson recovers from a serious knee injury, added: "It's time. It's reps. Just kind of getting those reps. Figuring guys out, getting to know each other. That's a huge part of basketball, too, getting to know each other ... That will come with time.

"It's no tough love right now. You figure that stuff out as time goes on. But none of us really know each other, except a few. So you can't give a guy you don't know tough love, that's fake as hell. If you're going to give somebody tough love, you don't even know if you love that person or not yet. So you can't give somebody tough love at this point, you just got to teach 'em."

The Warriors will open their preseason against the Los Angeles Lakers on Saturday.

Golden State will get their first taste of Chase Center in San Francisco, after saying goodbye to Oracle Arena following 47 years in Oakland.

Asked about Golden State's new home, Warriors head coach Steve Kerr said: "I think mainly the noise. It's hard to judge on a preseason game, but it feels like they did a really good job keeping the seats as close to the floor as possible.

"Some of the new arenas feel so vacuous, and this feels pretty intimate. I think we're going to have a really loud atmosphere in here, but we'll see."

Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson wants to be like Golden State Warriors and NBA All-Star Stephen Curry when he takes the gridiron.

Wilson and Curry are champions in their respective sports – the former an NFL Super Bowl champion with the Seahawks in 2014.

Curry has led the Warriors to three NBA titles since being drafted by Golden State in 2009.

After the Seahawks' narrow 30-29 win over the Los Angeles Rams on Thursday, Wilson said he is inspired by Curry.

"I think about Steph Curry and how he shoots a basketball — that's how I want to throw a football," Wilson said. "Put it on the money, make some crazy throws, make some crazy plays.

"I love watching sports, and he's one of my favourite guys to watch with how he shoots a basketball."

Wilson had an MVP-calibre performance to help push Seattle to 4-1 fir the season after finishing 17-of-23 passing for 268 yards against the Rams.

But nothing was as impressive as his first-half touchdown pass to Tyler Lockett that pretty much should have never happened.

The completion probability of the exact play was a mere 6.3 per cent, according to Next Gen Stats, and made for a Curry-like shot except for this time the ball was in Wilson's hands.

The pass to Lockett was one of four touchdown throws Wilson had on Thursday.

"He's been phenomenal," Lockett said. "The biggest thing is he's just doing his job. He's doing everything that we expect him to do and even more. He's putting us in a position to be great, to be able to win, to be able to finish games, to finish drives. That's what you want in a player. That's what you want in a captain."

Wilson continued his near-perfect performance, finishing with a 151.8 quarterback rating, to solidify one of the best starts of his career.

"It was just one after another after another after another after another," Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll said.

The Seahawks will take their momentum on the road to face the Cleveland Browns on October 13.

Draymond Green is confident the Golden State Warriors can reach the NBA Finals for the sixth successive season.

The Warriors contested their fifth consecutive Finals last season but went down to the Toronto Raptors in six games.

Since then, the Warriors have lost All-Star Kevin Durant to the Brooklyn Nets via free agency, while veteran Andre Iguodala was dealt to the Memphis Grizzlies and Shaun Livingston retired.

Klay Thompson is also recovering from a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) suffered in the Finals but Green remains bullish about Golden State's chances in 2019-20.

"I am not sure what everyone's expectations are," Green told ESPN. "We haven't really had any team meetings yet. But I know what my expectations are -- they don't change from year-to-year. They are always the same."

Asked if the Warriors – who acquired D'Angelo Russell in the offseason – can reach the Finals, Green said: "Is Steph Curry on our team? Klay Thompson? "Yup."

Green added: "Because I think obviously what we have returning and myself, Steph and Klay-- with the experience that we have, the championship pedigree that we have, and obviously all of us still being in our primes.

"Then you add in a young D'Angelo Russell, you add in Kevon Looney who just got a new contract -- it is a lot of talent. Like I said, experience and also a lot of younger guys who are out to prove themselves."

Warriors team-mate Stephen Curry said: "As long as we have the solid core that we've got. And the experiences to kind of back us up, we're going to keep that goal in mind.

"The fun part about it is that we get to kind of recreate the look of it and incorporating the new pieces that we have and that part's the most exciting. The last five Finals have kind of been a certain way, so whatever we do from here, you're going to enjoy it even more."

Klay Thompson's long road to recovery will extend until at least the NBA All-Star break, the Golden State Warriors announced.

Thompson suffered a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in game of the NBA Finals against the Toronto Raptors, who triumphed.

Golden State general manager Bob Myers spoke with media on Monday and told reporters: "He's doing fine.

"We'll have another update on him probably around the All-Star break. Don't construe that as if we think he'll be back by the All-Star break — that just means we'll have an update then."

The Warriors expressed optimism that Thompson will play at some point in the upcoming season.

The five-time All-Star will be entering his eighth season with the Warriors and is taking a true team approach.

"I'm going to do what the team says," Thompson said. "And I've done my due diligence on rehabs and ACL injuries, and the last thing you want to do is rush back, especially for a player like me who wants to play until he's in his late 30s.

"I want to play at a high level until that point, too. As much as it kills me not to be on the court, patience is a virtue, and rushing back would be not very smart."

Thompson had scored a game-high 30 points before being forced to leave the Game 6 contest against the Raptors, living up to the lethal "Game 6 Klay" persona he has taken on in recent years during the postseason.

The Warriors went on to lose Game 6 as the Raptors claimed their first championship.

Thompson averaged 21.5 points, 3.8 rebounds and 2.4 assists per game and shot 40.2 per cent from beyond the arc in 2018-19.

Kevin Durant said he felt it was "time for a change" after last season and so did not give too much thought to the Golden State warriors as he signed for the Brooklyn Nets.

Durant appeared as a Nets player for the first time on Friday, addressing a news conference.

Questions predictably focused on his decision to leave the dynasty he helped build with the Warriors for the hot-and-cold Nets, who have made the playoffs just once in the past four seasons.

But Durant said his achievements with Golden State were not on his mind as he entered free agency.

"I felt like it was time for a change," he told reporters. "I wanted to play for a new team and, simply put, I just did it.

"I didn't really think about what I was leaving behind or what we accomplished. I put that up on the shelf already.

"When it was time to make a decision about my future, I thought solely about me."

Asked if he considered staying with the Warriors or joining a team like the Los Angeles Clippers or New York Knicks, Durant replied: "I thought about it for a couple of seconds."

The 10-time All-Star and two-time NBA Finals MVP was ruled out of the end of last season and is expected to miss all of the coming campaign following an Achilles injury in Game 5 of the Finals series against the Toronto Raptors.

Durant had just returned from injury and that swift comeback prompted Kyrie Irving, a fellow new Nets signing, appearing alongside Durant on Friday, to discuss his thoughts.

"We all know K was not ready to play in that environment," Irving said. "We all know that, whether people want to admit it or not.

"He was out 31 days and we put him on a national stage to end up selling a product that came before the person Kevin and now I'm here to protect that.

"I'm going to be a protector of that all throughout the year and not allow anyone to infiltrate that circle.

"We have expectations for our team. We obviously know he's an integral part, but we'll wait for that.

"I'm very patient. I'll be [overly] patient with Kevin because I don't want anything to happen like that again.  I want him to be 101 per cent healthy."

Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr explained why he was not surprised superstar Kevin Durant left the team to join the Brooklyn Nets.

Durant – who is expected to miss the upcoming NBA campaign due to an Achilles injury – signed a four-year, $164million deal with the Nets in the offseason after opting to become a free agent.

When asked about Durant's departure, Kerr said he could see it coming as he thought the Warriors' dominant line-up and team chemistry had seemingly "run its course".

"I don't know why," Kerr told "The Full 48" podcast. "I do think we're in a different era where players are more interested by new challenges ... players see that there's a huge expanse out there; there's this horizon with so many different opportunities. And so you're just gonna have fewer teams that stick together for a long period of time.

"And that's just kind of how it felt this year for us. This thing has a finite ending point and this is probably it."

Some speculated that the verbal confrontation between Durant and Draymond Green on November 12 was part of the reason the two-time NBA Finals MVP left, but Kerr refuted that theory. 

"We kind of lost some momentum internally. It wasn't anything tangible," Kerr explained. "People point to the Draymond-Kevin incident. I honestly don't think that was that big of a deal, as crazy as that sounds." 

As for whether there was anything the Warriors could do to keep the 10-time All-Star? Kerr said, "Probably not. ... this thing was running its course and we kind of felt like he was moving on."

Durant, a two-time NBA champion, averaged 25.8 points per game with 7.1 rebounds and 5.4 assists during his three seasons with the Warriors.

Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr was not offended by Kevin Durant's recent criticism of their offense, describing his comments as "basically the truth".

Durant, who won two NBA titles with the Warriors but joined the Brooklyn Nets in July, told The Wall Street Journal this month that he did not believe Golden State's offense worked well in the playoffs.

"The motion offense we run in Golden State, it only works to a certain point," Durant said. "We can totally rely on our system for maybe the first two rounds. Then the next two rounds we're going to have to mix in individual play. We've got to throw teams off, because they're smarter in that round of playoffs.

"So now I have to dive into my bag, deep, to create stuff on my own, off the dribble, isos, pick-and-rolls, more so than let the offense create points for me."

Asked about Durant's comments, Kerr told The Athletic: "I wasn't at all offended what Kevin said because it's basically the truth. You look at any system, I mean, I played the triangle with Michael Jordan.

“The offense ran a lot smoother all regular season and the first couple rounds of the playoffs than it did in the conference finals and Finals. It just did.

"That's why guys like Michael Jordan and Kevin Durant and Kobe Bryant are who they are. They can transcend any defense. But defenses in the playoffs, deep in the playoffs, combined with the physicality of the game - where refs can't possibly call a foul every time - means that superstars have to take over.

"No system is just going to dice a Finals defense up. You have to rely on individual play. I didn't look at [his comment] as offensive. I look at that as fact."

Warriors star Stephen Curry last week gave Durant's comments short shrift.

"Well, I don't care what plays we ran. We won two championships," Curry said. "And, at the end of the day, we had a lot of talent and there was an expectation of us figuring out how to balance all that. And we talked a lot about it throughout the three-year run. It wasn't always perfect, but I think in terms of the results and what we were able to do on the floor, that kind of speaks for itself.

"We all want to play iso-ball at the end of the day in some way, shape or form. But I'd rather have some championships, too."

Durant, a 10-time All-Star, averaged 25.8 points per game with 7.1 rebounds and 5.4 assists during his three seasons with the Warriors. He signed with the Nets on a four-year, $164 million deal.

Stephen Curry plans to make his Olympics debut for the United States in Tokyo next year.

The Golden State Warriors star revealed he had designs on the 2020 Games, which is good news for the USA after the nation's seventh-placed finish at the recent FIBA World Cup. 

"That is the plan, for sure," Curry said in an interview with ESPN. "You know, obviously knock on wood, you don't want any injuries or things like that to interfere."

Curry played for Team USA in the 2010 and 2014 FIBA World Cup tournaments, winning the title both times, but this would be his first Olympics appearance.

"[I] definitely want to go," said Curry. "I've never been on the Olympic team. I've been on two World Cup championship gold-medal teams. But the Olympics is the experience that I want. And next year will hopefully be it."

While Curry is the first NBA star to commit to the squad, Warriors team-mate Draymond Green told CNBC last week that he also hopes to play. Meanwhile, LeBron James told The Athletic in April that playing for Team USA in 2020 could happen.

A USA squad shorn of their best talents due to a plethora of withdrawals produced their worst showing at a World Cup.

Curry, though, is understandably confident USA can reassert their dominance at the Olympics if their big names do decide to play.

"We're still the best," said the 31-year-old. "If we get the guys that are supposed to be there, in terms of, you know, representing us on the Olympic stage and the commitment's been there, and I think it'll be there next year."

Kevin Durant said he hates the "circus" surrounding the NBA as he opened up on his respective exits from the Oklahoma City Thunder and Golden State Warriors.

Durant ended a three-season stint with the Warriors at the end of the last campaign, switching to the Brooklyn Nets as a free agent on a four-year deal.

The 30-year-old, a 10-time All-Star, joined Golden State from the Thunder, where he spent nine campaigns – including one as a rookie at the Seattle SuperSonics before the franchise's move to Oklahoma – going on to win the championship with the Warriors in 2017 and 2018.

However, Durant believes the media speculation and fan furore around the NBA made his decision to leave the Warriors more acrimonious than it needed to be.

"It didn't feel as great as it could have been," Durant told the Wall Street Journal. "Some days I hate the circus of the NBA. Some days I hate that the players let the NBA business, the fame that comes with the business, alter their minds about the game.

"Sometimes I don't like being around the executives and politics that come with it. I hate that.

"We talk about mental health a lot... we only talk about it when it comes to players. We need to talk about it when it comes to executives, media, fans."

Durant believes a similar uproar surrounded his move to the Warriors in 2016, claiming he does not trust the Thunder's hierarchy. 

"I'll never be attached to that city again because of that," Durant said of Oklahoma City.

"I eventually wanted to come back to that city and be part of that community and organisation, but I don't trust nobody there. 

"The organisation, the [general manager], I ain't talked to none of those people, even had a nice exchange with those people, since I left.

"People coming to my house and spray-painting on the for-sale signs around my neighbourhood. People making videos in front of my house and burning my jerseys and calling me all types of crazy names."

Durant also explained that he left Golden State because he could not relate to many of his team-mates.

"As time went on, I started to realise I'm just different from the rest of the guys," Durant said. 

"It's not a bad thing. Just my circumstances and how I came up in the league. And on top of that, the media always looked at it like KD and the Warriors. So it's like nobody could [fully accept] me there."

Coco Gauff felt like she was the Golden State Warriors in Game 7 of the NBA Finals when she heard her named chanted by the Louis Armstrong crowd in Thursday's US Open second-round win over Timea Babos.

Teenage sensation Gauff was again responsible for a thrilling contest at Flushing Meadows, where the 15-year-old American outlasted Babos 6-2 4-6 6-4.

Gauff prevailed after a frenetic two hours, 23 minutes, during which the vociferous crowd frequently led 'Coco' chants as she set up a clash with defending champion and world number one Naomi Osaka.

Gauff conceded she was taken aback by the level of support received, telling a media conference: "For me it's still wild. This is the first time -- well, not the first time. The first round was the first time I actually had a chant, but today it was a lot louder and a little more consistent.

"I was thinking like maybe they feel like I'm Golden State in Game 7 or something. It's different because you're an individual player, so it's weird, I guess.

"Most of the time you hear the chants, it's for a whole team, not just for, like, me. So it was pretty cool."

Gauff saw her friend and doubles partner Caty McNally take a set off Serena Williams on Wednesday, while Taylor Townsend headlined Thursday's results with a stunning comeback against fourth seed Simona Halep.

Asked if she and McNally are inspiring each other now, Gauff replied: "Yeah, for sure. I remember in Midland she won her first pro title. I lost second round that tournament. She kind of inspired me, like, okay, it's possible to do well, I think, just in general, not just me and Caty but all the young Americans.

"I saw Taylor won today. I think we're all just kind of pushing each other. Obviously when we play against each other, we don't want the other person to win. But literally when we're playing someone else, we root for each other."

Gauff plays doubles with McNally on Friday and feels that match may aid her preparations for two-time grand slam champion Osaka.

"For me, doubles isn't a problem. I mean, juniors, I played doubles a lot of the times, almost every tournament if I can get into doubles, I'm playing it," said Gauff. 

"To me it helps because it's a different game. I guess you get to work on volleys, you get to work on your returns a lot in doubles.

"I think that's actually going to prepare me for Naomi, because doubles to me is more faster paced than singles. Naomi actually hits the ball pretty hard. I think it will prepare me well for Saturday's match."

Kevin Durant has set the record straight about whether the Golden State Warriors pressured him to return from injury and play against the Toronto Raptors in the 2019 NBA Finals.

The now-Brooklyn Nets star opened up about the events leading up to the ruptured Achilles he suffered in the first half of Game 5.

According to him, Golden State's staff do not deserve the blame.

"Hell, no. How can you blame [the Warriors]? Hell, no," Durant told Yahoo Sports. "I heard the Warriors pressured me into getting back. Nobody never said a word to me during rehab as I was coming back.

"It was only me and [director of sports medicine and performance] Rick [Celebrini] working out every day. Right when the series started, I targeted Game 5. Hell, nah. It just happened. It's basketball. S*** happens. Nobody was responsible for it. It was just the game. We just need to move on from that s*** because I'm going to be back playing."

Durant had strained his calf in a second-round series against the Houston Rockets and missed the team's sweep of the Portland Trail Blazers.

When Durant finally stepped back on the court in the championship series, he torched Toronto for 11 points in 12 minutes before suffering the possible career-altering injury.

Durant said he is focused on moving forward and making a comeback.

"Yeah, I still think about that night," Durant said. "Every experience I've been through in the league is obviously always ingrained in my mind, but that one is definitely always going to be a huge part of my career because it's the biggest stage and the type of injury I had.

"But now I look at it as me just going out there playing basketball, and I happened to get hurt. And now I'm just waiting to get back. I know it's a huge deal to everybody else, but I just try to take it on the chin and keep it moving."

Durant will play alongside his close friends Kyrie Irving and DeAndre Jordan in Brooklyn. When Durant was asked why he joined a team that finished 2018-19 with a 42-40 record and was eliminated in the first round of the playoffs, he kept his answer short and sweet.

"Because I wanted to," Durant said. "The basketball was appealing."

Durant averaged 26.0 points, 6.4 rebounds and 5.9 assists for the Warriors last season and was named Finals MVP twice in his three years with the team.

While he will likely miss all of 2019-20, it appears like he is content with his new team.

"If I was leaving the Warriors, it was always going to be for the Nets," Durant said. "They got the pieces and a creative front office. I just like what they were building."

Golden State Warriors star forward Draymond Green has reportedly agreed to a four-year extension.

Green's agent Rich Paul reportedly told ESPN his client has come to terms with the Warriors on an extension worth $100million, taking the total value of his five-year contract to $118m.

The extension brings the Warriors' number of max contract players to four.

Green had signed a five-year, $82m deal in 2015-16 and was entering the final season of that contract before Golden State offered him an extension, keeping him with the team until 2023-24.

His payday comes earlier than expected, a turn of events most likely brought on by Kevin Durant's switch to the Brooklyn Nets.

The Warriors were reportedly prepared to offer Klay Thompson and Durant max contracts this offseason and did sign the former to a five-year, $190m deal despite the fact he tore his ACL in Game 6 of this year's NBA Finals and will miss the majority of next season.

Durant, who ruptured his Achilles in Game 5 of the championship series, chose to join forces with Kyrie Irving in Brooklyn, making it feasible for the Warriors to give Green a hefty sum now.

Green, 29, is a three-time All-Star and won Defensive Player of the Year in 2017-18. He has been a part of three Golden State championship teams and has been a valuable contributor with his physical play, defensive versatility and playmaking ability.

He had two triple-doubles in the 2019 NBA Finals and averaged 7.4 points, 7.3 rebounds and 6.9 assists per game for the season.

The Warriors acquired D'Angelo Russell in a sign-and-trade with the Nets and also added Willie Cauley-Stein in free agency.

Having also bade farewell to veterans Andre Iguodala and Shaun Livingston, the Warriors will have a very different look next season, but retaining Green stabilises their core group by keeping him alongside Thompson and Stephen Curry.

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