Alphonso Davies has proven "a real hit" for Bayern Munich among a squad packed with player of the season candidates, according to club president Herbert Hainer.

The 19-year-old Canadian has been at Bayern for 18 months after signing from Vancouver Whitecaps, and phenomenal pace and technique on the left flank has made Davies a raging success.

Bayern netted a Bundesliga and DFB-Pokal double in 2019-20, with Davies making 29 league appearances, scoring three times and recording five assists.

He looks like having a major role in the future of the team, and he sprang to mind when Hainer was asked who ranked as his top performer over the season.

"It's hard to single out one person in this great team, they were all sensational. But the development of Alphonso Davies has given me a lot of pleasure," Hainer told Bayern's official website.

"A little over a year ago, nobody knew Alphonso Davies, but now he is delighting our fans all over the world.

"A real hit: he is absolutely top-class on the pitch and with his young, fresh manner, he is well on the way to becoming a popular figure. The boy makes us very happy."

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Not content with being the dominant men's team in Germany, Bayern also want to make themselves the cream of the women's game.

Bayern missed out on the Frauen Bundesliga in 2019-20 to a Wolfsburg side who went unbeaten through the league campaign, winning 20 of 22 games as they finished eight points clear.

Wolfsburg have reeled off four successive women's titles since Bayern had back-to-back 2014-15 and 2015-16 successes.

Bayern have recently acquired the likes of Austria midfielder Sarah Zadrazil and France forward Viviane Asseyi, as they look to close the gap on the reigning champions.

Like the men's team, they also remain in the hunt for Champions League glory this season, with a quarter-final against mighty French outfit Lyon to come on August 22 in Bilbao.

Hainer said: "It is our clear goal to knock VfL Wolfsburg off the top and become the number one in German women's football.

"A lot of work is being done to achieve this, and we have already been able to announce some notable new signings for the upcoming season. I will also be following the Champions League closely – should our team reach the final, I will be there in San Sebastian."

The Bundesliga playing games behind closed doors could cause "devastating" scenes of fans gathering outside stadiums, the deputy chairman of the German Police Trade Union has warned.

Germany's top flight, like the majority of European leagues, is suspended due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

The top two tiers in Germany are suspended until at least April 30, with mass gatherings having been prohibited by the government until the end of August.

However, this month German Football Federation (DFL) chief executive Christian Seifert said discussions were in place over a return to action in early May with matches behind closed doors.

Seifert confirmed the DFL's plans to continue with the season and that the start date will be May 9 so long as the plan gets government backing.

But senior union official Jorg Radek believes doing so would pose a risk to public health.

"Maybe it is possible to control what is happening in the stadium. This does not apply to the public space in front of it. The stadiums become a potential target for fans who want to support their team," Radek said in an interview with the Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung.

"That would be devastating. We can't have large crowds outside the stadium gates. It's not only forbidden, it would be irresponsible.

"It becomes relevant to the police at that moment, we then have to ensure that the requirements that currently apply to behaviour in public space are complied with - the requirement of a distance of one and a half metres, the ban on the assembly of large groups, the wearing of masks.

"We will have to intervene in terms of maintaining security and order if this is not guaranteed.

"I want to state that we as a police union are not fundamentally against football games.

"I can also understand that there is a need for many people to stop watching old international matches or old Bundesliga games, but we must not forget what special situation we are all in - this includes the police.

"Games behind closed doors are a danger, even if the organiser does everything in the stadium to ensure that hygiene regulations are observed in order to keep the risk of infection as low as possible."

He said the DFL plans do not appear to cover such aspects and spoke of the prospect of an "additional burden" on police.

"Running the league on the weekends is a huge burden for us even without a corona pandemic," said Radek. "By pausing, we gained a personnel reserve that we could fall back on to increase our presence elsewhere."

The Bundesliga playing games behind closed doors would be "irresponsible" as it may encourage fans to gather outside stadiums, the deputy chairman of the German Police Trade Union has warned.

Germany's top flight, like the majority of European leagues, is suspended due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

The top two tiers in Germany are suspended until at least April 30, with mass gatherings having been prohibited by the government until the end of August.

However, this month German Football Federation (DFL) chief executive Christian Seifert said discussions were in place over a return to action in early May with matches behind closed doors.

Seifert confirmed the DFL's plans to continue with the season and that the start date will by May 9 so long as the plan gets government backing.

But senior union official Jorg Radek believes doing so would pose a risk to public health.

"Maybe it is possible to control what is happening in the stadium. This does not apply to the public space in front of it. The stadiums become a potential target for fans who want to support their team," Radek said in an interview with the Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung.

"That would be devastating. We can't have large crowds outside the stadium gates. It's not only forbidden, it would be irresponsible.

"It becomes relevant to the police at that moment, we then have to ensure that the requirements that currently apply to behaviour in public space are complied with - the requirement of a distance of one and a half metres, the ban on the assembly of large groups, the wearing of masks.

"We will have to intervene in terms of maintaining security and order if this is not guaranteed.

"I want to state that we as a police union are not fundamentally against football games.

"I can also understand that there is a need for many people to stop watching old international matches or old Bundesliga games, but we must not forget what special situation we are all in - this includes the police.

"Games behind closed doors are a danger, even if the organiser does everything in the stadium to ensure that hygiene regulations are observed in order to keep the risk of infection as low as possible."

He said the DFL plans do not appear to cover such aspects and spoke of the prospect of an "additional burden" on police.

"Running the league on the weekends is a huge burden for us even without a corona pandemic," said Radek. "By pausing, we gained a personnel reserve that we could fall back on to increase our presence elsewhere."

The Bundesliga is on track to resume the 2019-20 season in May but the final decision on the restart date lies with politicians, the German Football League (DFL) announced on Thursday.

Germany's top two tiers are suspended until April 30 due to the coronavirus pandemic, while mass gatherings have been prohibited by the government until the end of August.

DFL chief executive Christian Seifert said this month the organisation was working towards a return to action in early May with games played behind closed doors.

Following a virtual meeting between the 36 clubs on Thursday, the DFL confirmed its plans to continue with the season.

Seifert said: "The Bundesliga is ready to resume, whether on May 9 or a later date. But it's not up to us to find a date, the political decision-makers decide.

"We have not defined an exact date today. The fact that we are even able to think about resuming games underlines the performance of the German authorities. It would be presumptuous for the DFL to name an exact date for the restart.

"If the signal comes in the next week that it can be May 9, then it will be May 9. It's not up to us whether we can play at all. It is only up to us to create the framework conditions.

"The season should be finished by June 30. If we need to play in July too, we will. We are currently not thinking about next season. First of all, it is the matter of ending the current season."

Guidelines for the staging of matches include strict hygiene requirements, close testing and permanent monitoring of those at the games. The DFL will also provide €500,000 to public health authorities to help with coronavirus testing.

Access to Bundesliga stadiums will be limited to 213 people on matchdays and Seifert urged fans not to gather outside arenas.

"When we start playing again, gatherings outside the stadium must be avoided," said Seifert.

"Otherwise the fans will need to accept the fact that the matches will not take place. If this happens during the match, it will be cancelled.

"The situation might even require us to talk about games without fans next year. Therefore, the clubs should plan without income from spectators for the time being."

It was also announced by the DFL that €7.5million from the solidarity fund set up by Bayern Munich, Borussia Dortmund, RB Leipzig and Bayer Leverkusen will be shared equally between the 3. Liga and women's Bundesliga.

In Germany there have been over 151,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 5,354 recorded deaths.

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