After previously incurring the wrath of the Football Association (FA) for a "bangers and mash" kit, non-league side AFC Bedale have taken a step closer to the 'veg'.

Last year, the FA found Bedale to be infringing sponsorship rules after they revealed a garish uniform that was essentially sausages, mashed potatoes and peas.

The club were banned from wearing it in any matches, a fact rued by the club as it had been voted "worst ever kit" by the Kitted Out podcast.

But undeterred by that incident, Bedale's desire to upset the applecart has grown, and they hope fans will be able to root for the team in their new kit.

Instead of a sausage, the strip's centre-piece is a carrot, which sees the shorts coloured entirely orange and then the top of the vegetable stops in the upper-chest area, with blue sky then covering the shoulders.

Bedale began creating bizarre sausage-themed kits in 2017 as part of a push to raise money for Prostate Cancer UK, but the latest is their first veggie effort.

The 2020-21 goalkeeper top depicts a cheese grater, and the club brie-lieve the FA will not be as annoyed this time around.

 

 

 

 

 

Sarina Wiegman will succeed Phil Neville as England Women's head coach from September next year. 

The Netherlands boss will replace the former Manchester United defender on a four-year deal.

Neville's contract expires in July 2021, with the 43-year-old having been appointed in January 2018.

Wiegman will remain in charge of her home nation for the delayed Tokyo Olympics in 2021, while it remains to be seen who will oversee the Great Britain team in Japan.

"England is the cradle of football and I'm very much looking forward to contributing my experience and expertise to this ambitious team," said Wiegman, who guided Netherlands to the Euro 2017 title and last year's World Cup final.

Football Association chief executive Mark Bullingham said: "Sarina was the outstanding candidate from a very strong field.

"She is a proven winner and we are confident she can take England to the next level, giving us the best possible opportunity of achieving our ambition to win a major tournament."

The 50-year-old's first opportunity to deliver on that will be at the postponed Women's Euros, now scheduled for July 2022.

The Football Association has announced there will be no replays in the FA Cup next season.

With the coronavirus pandemic having led to an adjusted schedule for 2020-21, the FA has taken the decision to scrap replays in order to ease the pressure on clubs.

Qualification for England's major cup competition will begin on September 1, with the first round proper taking place in November.

Premier League clubs will enter as usual in the third round, to be played in early January, with the final scheduled for May 15, 2021.

The FA also announced that, after record prize funds for the last two seasons, the reward money has gone back to the level it was in 2017-18, due to the financial impact of COVID-19.

Arsenal or Chelsea will face Liverpool in the Community Shield at Wembley Stadium on August 29, the Football Association (FA) has confirmed.

Mikel Arteta's Arsenal side will go head-to-head with their London rivals in the FA Cup final on Saturday, with the winner to take on the Premier League's champions.

With the 2020-21 top-flight campaign set to start on September 12, the FA has now announced its date for English football's traditional curtain-raiser.

Liverpool, who lost the Community Shield on penalties to Manchester City last season, had their first Premier League title wrapped up when Chelsea defeated Pep Guardiola's side on June 25.

Fulham striker Aleksandar Mitrovic has been handed a three-game ban by the Football Association (FA) for elbowing Leeds United defender Ben White.

The FA has retrospectively punished Mitrovic for an incident that happened just two minutes into Leeds' 3-0 Championship win over Fulham at Elland Road on Saturday.

Referee Tony Harrington did not see the incident at the time but Mitrovic admitted the act constituted violent conduct and he has therefore been banned.

Fulham, fifth in the table, are 10 points behind leaders Leeds and seven adrift of second-placed West Brom with seven games to go.

Mitrovic is the Championship's joint top scorer having netted 23 of his team's 52 goals in 2019-20.

The 25-year-old will miss matches against QPR, Birmingham City and Nottingham Forest.

The Football Association (FA) says it will make 82 people redundant as the governing body braces for approximate losses of £300million caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

While COVID-19 brought mass disruption to sport across the world, it also caused many other industries to come to a standstill, and the FA has been impacted by more than just the three-month suspension of football.

All events due to be held at Wembley Stadium since March have been unable to go ahead, while all future bookings for the year – which include concerts and NFL matches – had to be scrapped.

Hospitality revenue for Wembley Stadium brings in an estimated £35m to the FA every year, but the not-for-profit organisation considers that figure to have "completely fallen away and will probably take years to recover".

The financial implications of the pandemic have forced the FA to analyse all areas of the business for cost-saving purposes, but CEO Mark Bullingham revealed the situation worsened to an extent where staff need to be cut.

In a statement published to the FA's website, Bullingham wrote: "The high level of uncertainty in our landscape means that we have had to plan for a whole range of potential scenarios. As previously communicated, we are currently planning for potential losses of approximately £300million. As a not-for-profit organisation, this will hit us hard.

"Therefore, over recent months, we have forensically analysed the budget of every division within The FA in order to identify the most suitable areas to make costs savings; and the situation has worsened to a point where we now need to reduce the size of The FA in order to deal with the financial impact of the crisis.

"We are proposing to make 124 positions redundant. Because we halted recruitment the day we left the offices in March, we are able to take 42 vacant positions out of the structure, which means that we are proposing to remove 82 roles from the organisation.

"Proposing redundancies is the toughest cost-saving measure that any organisation can consider implementing, but we believe that we must now adapt and future-proof the organisation to ensure our cost base reflects a future with significantly lower revenues.

"We have a responsibility to preserve our core functions that regulate and serve English football. We also have a duty to support our men's and women's senior teams in their efforts to win major tournaments.

"That means we have set out in our proposals some difficult choices because we do not think we can afford to do all the things that we did before. We believe the impact of this crisis is to force us to focus more than ever on our key priorities."

Tottenham and England midfielder Dele Alli has been handed a one-match ban for a racially insensitive social media post, the Football Association (FA) has announced.

Alli was charged by the FA in February over a Snapchat post that showed him in an airport mocking an Asian man in reference to coronavirus.

The video showed Alli wearing a protective facemask in an airport and was entitled ,"Corona whattt, please listen with volume". It cut to the gentleman, who appeared to be unaware he was being filmed, before panning to a bottle of antiseptic handwash.

Underneath, a caption read: "This virus gunna have to be quicker than that to catch me."

The 24-year-old deleted the video and posted an apology to the Chinese social media network Weibo.

He denied his initial post was in breach of FA regulations, and as detailed in the written reasons, Alli said he videoed the man because he was coughing, not because of his ethnicity.

However, his ban means he will now be absent when Tottenham resume their Premier League campaign at home to Manchester United next week.

Alli must also pay a £50,000 fine and undertake an education course after the governing body found his actions to be "insulting and/or improper and/or brought the game into disrepute" under FA Rule E3 (1).

It additionally constituted an "aggravated breach" in line with the second sub section of that rule, because "It included a reference, whether express or implied, to race and/or colour and /or ethnic origin and/or nationality".

"It was not the FA’s case that Dele Alli was a racist," the FA's written reasons from the case read. " The FA’s case was that 'without sufficient thought', the player shared a video that depicted an 'unacceptable racist stereotype' in a misguided attempt at humour." 

In a statement posted on Tottenham's official website, Alli said: "In response to the FA decision, I would like to apologise again for any offence caused by my behaviour.

"It was an extremely poorly judged joke about a virus that has now affected us more than we could ever have imagined. I’m grateful that the FA has confirmed that my actions were not racist because I despise racism of any kind. We all need to be mindful of the words and actions we use and how they can be perceived by others."

Alli's punishment is identical to the one the FA handed to Bernardo Silva last year, when the Manchester City playmaker posted a tweet that compared team-mate Benjamin Mendy to a logo produced by Conguitos, a Spanish confectionary brand.

Conguitos' branding has been criticised for having racist connotations.

The FA has promised to use a "common-sense approach" when dealing with players who show support towards movements such as Black Lives Matter during matches.

On Monday, FIFA issued a statement urging leagues around the world to exercise caution before punishing players for their behaviour amid the global outcry following the death of George Floyd.

The message from the governing body came after the German Football Association (DFB) said it would examine incidents from last weekend to see whether further sanctions against player protests were necessary.

Borussia Dortmund's Jadon Sancho was booked for celebrating a goal by revealing a t-shirt that said 'Justice for George Floyd', while Schalke's Weston McKennie wore an armband with the same slogan and Marcus Thuram took a knee after scoring for Borussia Monchengladbach.

The incidents came after news of Floyd, a black man who died after being knelt upon by a white police officer while in custody in Minneapolis, sparked widespread civil unrest in the United States.

Footballers in England including Paul Pogba and Marcus Rashford have issued anti-racism calls in recent days and teams such as Liverpool and Chelsea took a knee during training.

The FA has vowed it will not necessarily punish players for any on-pitch protests even if they are in breach of the rules of the game.

"The FA strongly condemns discrimination of any kind and has endeavoured to ensure that football in England is both diverse and inclusive in recent years," said English football's governing body.

"Where any behaviours or gestures on the pitch that may constitute a breach of the Laws of the Game have to be assessed, they would be reviewed on a case by case basis with a common-sense approach and understanding of their context.

"The power of football can break down barriers across communities and we remain deeply committed to removing all forms of discrimination from across the game we all love."

The Premier League, suspended in March due to the coronavirus pandemic, is due to resume on June 17.

The Football Association (FA) will face FIFA in court next month to challenge a ruling relating to Chelsea's transfer ban.

Chelsea were punished in February 2019 for breaches of the rules pertaining to the international transfer and registration of players under the age of 18.

Initially barred from making any signings for two transfer windows while also hit with a fine, the Premier League club had their punishments reduced on appeal.

The FA, meanwhile, was fined 510,000 Swiss francs (£391,000 as it processes player registrations. However, an appeal saw the amount lowered to 350,000 Swiss francs by a FIFA committee.

English football's governing body has now escalated the case to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. A hearing is due to take place on June 26.

When contacted by Stats Perform, an FA spokesperson said: "The FA has cooperated fully with FIFA’s investigation. As this is an ongoing legal process it would not be appropriate to comment further at this time."

Football Association (FA) chairman Greg Clarke admitted fans must realise that they will not be allowed back into stadiums for the foreseeable future when games resume.

The majority of leagues are currently suspended across the world due to restrictions imposed amid the coronavirus pandemic, though several divisions, including the Bundesliga and the Premier League, are keen to resume when it is safe to do so.

However, the logistics of resuming such competitions still need to be ironed out and it appears clear that any matches will be staged behind closed doors, potentially at neutral venues.

Clarke conceded those restrictions will not only be implemented, but are set to be the reality for some time.

In a letter sent to the FA Council and republished on the governing body's website, Clarke wrote: "It is no secret that domestically, a huge amount of work is taking place to assess whether a restart to the English season will be possible.

"Whilst we would all like to see football return in the coming weeks, the health of our communities and the protection of the NHS must remain our priority and we will continue to be led by government advice as we work together with stakeholders from across the game to assess any potential restart.

"The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant financial impact on all sectors of society and sadly football is one of many sports to have been affected as a consequence.

"I want to assure you that we are committed to supporting the game as a whole through this crisis; especially the lower echelons, where the impact has been felt most acutely.

"We remain in contact with colleagues and stakeholders from across both the national and professional game and will continue to work together to offer support as we look to navigate our way through this difficult period.

"So far this has taken a host of different forms from advancing payments due, to giving extensive advisory support, to unlocking money from government and other football stakeholders. We have other ideas in the pipeline such as an initiative with the Football Foundation that we will announce next week.

"Our executive team has been building out different scenarios that we might potentially face as a result of the pandemic. The reality is that we just don't know how things are going to pan out, but with social distancing in place for some time to come we do face substantial changes to the whole football ecosystem.

"For example, it's hard to foresee crowds of fans – who are the lifeblood of the game – returning to matches any time soon."

Clarke added that the FA faced an annual budget cut of £75million this year and the deficit could reach £300million across four years in "a worst-case scenario".

Atletico Madrid and England defender Kieran Trippier has been hit with a misconduct charge over allegedly breaching Football Association (FA) betting regulations.

The former Tottenham full-back is alleged to have breached rules E8(1)(a) and E8(1)(b) last July.

Rule E8(1)(a) states: "A participant shall not bet, either directly or indirectly, or instruct, permit, cause or enable any person to bet on – (i) the result, progress, conduct or any other aspect of, or occurrence in or in connection with, a football match or competition; or (ii) any other matter concerning or related to football anywhere in the world, including, for example and without limitation, the transfer of players, employment of managers, team selection or disciplinary matters."

While Rule E8(1)(b) stipulates: "Where a participant provides to any other person any information relating to football which the participant has obtained by virtue of his or her position within the game and which is not publicly available at that time, the participant shall be in breach of this rule where any of that information is used by that other person for, or in relation to, betting."

Trippier has until May 18 to respond to the charges. 

The 29-year-old joined Atleti from Spurs in July 2019 on a three-year deal for a reported fee of $25million.

Jill Ellis ruled the world with the United States women's national team, and Karen Carney says the English-born coach could be perfect for the Lionesses.

The Football Association is looking for a new head coach to lead England after it was announced Phil Neville will leave his position next year.

Carney, a 144-cap former midfield star with England, says Ellis, who won the Women's World Cup with the USWNT in 2015 and 2019, has strong credentials for the job.

Ellis, 53, was born in Hampshire and moved to the United States with her family as a teenager. She spent five years in charge of the USA before stepping down after the second World Cup win.

England will be hosts of the next European Championship, which has been delayed by 12 months until 2022, and Carney thinks Ellis would be capable of handling the high-pressure challenge of leading the team into such a tournament.

Carney told BBC Radio 5 Live: "I would probably go after Jill Ellis because she is the former US manager, she's proven. To be the American manager you're getting things fired at you, left, right and centre, so you've got to have a strong personality so I think she could do it.

"To have a home Euros, you're going to have a lot of things thrown at you. You've got to stand big and strong."

England have reached the semi-finals of the last two Women's World Cups, losing at that stage to the US last year in France, and also got to the last four at Euro 2017.

Carney urged the team to "find a way of getting a gold somehow" and said it was important to make the switch to the next Lionesses coach "a comfortable transition for the players".

Carney also appeared to question whether it might make sense to end the Neville era sooner given a decision has already been reached to move on.

"For England, if I was a player I'd probably want a bit of continuity now," she said.

"[The European Championship] is on home soil, it's an opportunity to really showcase the women's game.

"It's not a make-or-break situation, but it's on home soil and all eyes will be on us.

"So we have to give the players the best opportunity and is that to get a manager in sooner rather than later? I don't know.

"I'm sure there's contract issues in that and also the climate we're currently in."

Phil Neville will leave his role as England Women's manager when his contract expires in 2021, the Football Association has confirmed.

Lionesses boss Neville had been set to lead the team into Euro 2021, with his deal up following the tournament.

However, with the coronavirus pandemic impacting the football calendar, pushing the men's Euro 2020 into next year, the women's finals have been delayed to 2022.

Neville will continue in the position until his contract ends but will then depart, leaving a new appointment to take charge as England hosts the tournament.

The 43-year-old had also been set to coach Team GB at the Tokyo Games, though, and his role in the Olympics set-up is less clear.

The 2020 Olympics have been postponed until 2021, and the FA has not yet reached an agreement with the British Olympic Association on the possibility of Neville taking charge in Japan as planned.

"In light of the impact of current global events on the sporting calendar and in the best interests of the England Women's team, both parties were in agreement that our shared priority was to ensure the Lionesses have continuity of coaching going into the home Euro and looking towards the 2023 FIFA World Cup," Sue Campbell, the FA's director of women's football, said in a statement.

"Once football returns after this difficult period, Phil will continue his work with the Lionesses on the further development of his squad. I will support him fully with that important task while moving forward with the crucial succession planning process. 

"We will now discuss next steps with the British Olympic Association and the home nations with regard to Team GB football, and we are not in a position to make any further comment at this time."

Neville added: "As a result of the changes to the proposed tournament scheduling, we will now be working to plan for a revised match calendar once it is safe and appropriate to do so.

"I am looking forward to getting back to work with the team as soon as possible. We have a fantastic squad of players and there is plenty to work on as we look to progress as a team going into 2021."

Former Manchester United defender Neville was appointed to his first senior coaching role as England manager in 2018.

The Lionesses won the SheBelieves Cup in 2019 before reaching the Women's World Cup semi-finals later in the same year, losing to eventual champions the United States.

Football Association chairman Greg Clarke has warned the English game could be "decimated" by the coronavirus impact as he urged players and clubs to "share the pain" in a rescue effort.

In a stark message that English football is heading towards financial chaos, Clarke cautioned clubs and leagues risked being swept away to oblivion, saying it was time for major stakeholders to "agree common cause to save our game".

He also said there was no certainty the 2019-20 Premier League and English Football League seasons could be finished, despite every best intention, given the ongoing uncertainty of when matches can be played again.

Speaking at a meeting of the FA council on Tuesday, Clarke said the consequences of COVID-19 would strike clubs at all levels, from the Premier League to grassroots, and urged those with the wherewithal to "contribute".

The FA itself faces losing out on tens of millions in anticipated revenue, and Clarke says football is already "burning through its cash reserves".

The impact on broadcast deals, particularly if the current season has to be abandoned, could be dire for clubs that have come to rely on such income.

Clarke said that "prudence is our only sensible option", as he delivered a grim address in the midst of the unprecedented crisis.

"We are committed to finishing the professional football season as this resolves the issues of promotion and relegation together with title winners on merit," Clarke said.

"However, we may not be able to finish the season as football is not our priority, human life is, and we will do as the government directs as the pandemic unfolds."

In a searing statement, he warned: "Football faces economic challenges beyond the wildest imagination of those who run it. The pandemic will be followed by its economic consequences and all business sectors will suffer.

"We face the danger of losing clubs and leagues as finances collapse. Many communities could lose the clubs at their heart with little chance of resurrection.

"In the face of this unprecedented adversity, all the stakeholders within the game from players, fans, clubs, owners and administrators need to step up and share the pain to keep the game alive.

"Everyone should understand that the Premier League clubs are not immune from the impact of this and whilst they are impacted to different degrees depending on their cost base, the potential overall financial impact is huge.

"We must have a plan to ensure that English football is not decimated should this season be lost and next season blighted. We hope we do not need this plan as we are all determined to finish the professional football season. However, we would be fools not to develop such a contingency plan."

Clarke suggested the game's authorities would be judged "harshly" should clubs go to the wall, and it was clear his message was an appeal to the Premier League, EFL and the richest clubs to help those facing the most grievous hardship.

"Time is pressing as football burns through its cash reserves with no sign yet of a resumption of the game. Pointing fingers serves no purpose," he added.

"It is time for the stakeholders to agree common cause to save our game. Contribute. Football is a team game and now is the time for teamwork."

England's Football Association (FA) has announced up to 30 per cent temporary pay cuts for its highest earners and proposed staff paid more than £50,000 yearly accept a reduction to mitigate financial issues caused the coronavirus pandemic.

COVID-19 has claimed the lives of over 70,000 people worldwide since its emergence in China late last year, impacting everyday life for almost everyone on the planet.

Top-level sport has consequently been interrupted and the knock-on effect of that is financial strain on leagues, clubs and governing bodies.

Some Premier League clubs have taken advantage of the United Kingdom government's furlough scheme, which allows members of the workforce affected by the pandemic to claim 80 per cent of their wages – up to £2,500 a month – from the state.

The FA is yet to follow suit, with the likes of Tottenham and Liverpool attracting widespread criticism for using the scheme, instead proposing staff earning more than £50,000 a year accept a reduction of 7.5 per cent, while the highest earners – including the likes of England manager Gareth Southgate – face a cut of up to 30 per cent as the organisation predicts a financial impact that could exceed £150million.

A statement from FA CEO Mark Bullingham read: "We've taken an immediate and significant financial impact due to the postponement of England internationals, FA Cup matches and Wembley events, and there is currently no clear timescale on when they will return.

"The total financial impact is currently forecast to be around £100m, but it could easily exceed £150m depending on the duration of the government's necessary medical measures.

"Along with many other organisations across the country, we are currently reviewing our financial model during this challenging period. We want to take prudent and appropriate steps to help protect and support the FA and our employees during this unpredictable time.

"We are proposing that all employees earning £50,000 or more per annum will take a temporary pay reduction of 7.5 per cent. In the spirit of those on higher salaries taking the greater responsibility, the senior management team have agreed to cut their pay by 15 per cent with the highest earners in the organisation agreeing to reduce their pay by up to 30 per cent.

"We are also looking into what options are available to us through the government's furlough scheme as a contingency plan, while we continue to plan for the return of football, once it is safe to do so.

"These are extraordinary and challenging times and we do not take these decisions lightly. However, as an organisation we will support each other as best we can."

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