While the West Indies were expected to dominate their one-off Test against Afghanistan in Lucknow, India, they still had to do it and it was important to their skipper, Jason Holder, that the year ended with his side tasting some success.

The West Indies, playing in a one-off Test after T20 and ODI series against Afghanistan, were emphatic nine-wicket winners after bowling out the hosts for 187 and 120 while scoring 277 and 31-1.

The results were brought about by Rahkeem Cornwall’s 7-75 and 3-46, as well as Shamarh Brooks first-innings knock of 111.

“Really important win, you know. We had a tough series against India. Was important to finish the year well,” said Holder after his West Indies side finished the game inside three days.

Holder also pointed out that there was a certain type of unity within the West Indies squad that he believed would hold them in good stead for bigger challenges on the horizon.

“We've got a good group going. The whole management staff has been excellent. We've got good unity, we have a one-team motif. Once we love one another, the job becomes much easier on the cricket field. Hope it continues," he said.

Holder was also pleased with the way the new players in the side have come on and held their hands up to be counted when the going gets tough.

“Very pleasing to see new guys come in and take the opportunity. Shamarh did that. He scored a fifty in the last innings and followed it with a hundred here. It was full of class. And then Rahkeem getting seven in the first innings, in just his second Test, is amazing,” said Holder.

Rory Burns hailed a "beautiful" performance from Joe Root and was happy to get his own tempo right as both struck hundreds for England on day three of the second Test with New Zealand.

Burns hit only his second Test century as England fought back at Hamilton, while captain Root ended a long wait with his first ton in the five-day game since February.

Root's 17th Test hundred will ease the pressure on the under-pressure skipper, who has consistently faced questions over whether the burden of the captaincy was affecting his form.

He stood unbeaten on 114 but Burns was run out on 101, with England going on to lose the wickets of Ben Stokes and Zak Crawley before the close, leaving them on 269-5 in reply to New Zealand's 375.

Speaking to Sky Sports, Burns said of Root: "He played beautifully, to get himself back to where he wants to be, good Test match hundred and he's still in and still fighting away and hopefully he's going to make it a massive one.

"From a personal point I feel like I got my tempo right and managed to cash in."

On the run-out, when he was pushing for a second run, Burns added: "I thought I was just about there. I thought I had enough in the tank but didn't quite. That's disappointing to miss out in that way, it could have been a real big one."

England's prospects of winning the match and saving the two-game series appear to be slim, with the tourists facing the likelihood of needing to bat well into day four to gain a lead with which they could declare and then attempt to claim an innings victory.

Burns, however, remained hopeful, saying: "There's still a fair bit of batting there, it's about getting as far ahead of them as we can now and see what we can enforce."

An unbeaten century from Joe Root helped England stay in the second Test against New Zealand in Hamilton on Sunday.

Root (114 not out) guided England to 269-5 in response to the Black Caps' 375 at stumps on day three at Seddon Park.

The England captain scored his first Test century since February to give the tourists hope of salvaging a drawn series.

Rory Burns (101) also made a century after England had resumed in a precarious position at 39-2.

Burns and Root controlled the first session, although the latter needed a review when given out caught behind on 47, a delivery from debutant Daryl Mitchell (0-28) having hit his pad, not bat.

Burns was dropped on 10 on Saturday and he survived again on 86, Matt Henry (1-56) squandering a great run-out chance as the difficult day continued for New Zealand.

The England opener would reach his second Test ton before being run out thanks to excellent fielding by Jeet Raval.

England had battled through the second session as Ben Stokes (26) joined Root before the all-rounder edged Tim Southee (2-63) to Ross Taylor at slip.

Much to his relief, Root got to his 17th Test century thanks to an under-edge that went for four.

Zak Crawley, making his Test debut for England, only lasted six balls before edging behind to BJ Watling off Neil Wagner (1-76).

Rain meant the day was cut short with England back in the Test and hoping Root and Ollie Pope (4) can push them into a first-innings lead on Monday.

Rahkeem Cornwall’s 10-wicket haul in a nine-wicket win for the West Indies over Afghanistan in Lucknow, India, while a great start, is just one part of the game the all-rounder wants to get right for the regional side.

Afghanistan skipper Rashid Khan believes his side can be a much better Test side given the opportunity.

Rashid was speaking after Friday’s demolition at the hands of the West Indies in Lucknow, India.

The West Indies, playing in a one-off Test after T20 and ODI series against Afghanistan, were emphatic nine-wicket winners after bowling out the hosts for 187 and 120 while scoring 277 and 31-1.

The results were brought about by Rahkeem Cornwall’s 7-75 and 3-46, as well as Shamarh Brooks first-innings knock of 111.

But according to Rashid, despite the one-sidedness of the affair, there isn’t a big gap between Afghanistan and the better Test-playing nations.

“I think, what I've seen, we've been struggling in the longer formats. Especially in batting. That's the only area we need to improve. Once we do that, we can trouble good sides,” he said.

The Afghanistan skipper believes that his team lacks experience, and with a little more of it, the teams at the top will have to watch out.

“Still early days in our Test careers, only our fourth game, against an experienced Windies. Hope to recover from our mistakes. We want more Tests,” said Rashid.

At the moment, the opportunity for Afghanistan to play more Test cricket and to get that valuable experience is a little beyond them, a situation, Rashid is not happy with.

“Just one Test per year isn't good enough.”

But the talent is there and Rashid is hopeful that the best for Afghanistan, is yet to come.

“Great talent for us in the future. We are not taking our batting innings long. People are getting out for thirties and forties. We need to work on that. Overall, quite disappointing. And we will try to bring the improvements,” said Rashid.

Afghanistan will now turn its attention away from Test cricket for the moment to the Asia Cup and the T20 World Cup early next year.

As Steve Smith rebuilt his reputation with an otherworldly performance in the 2019 Ashes, it was impossible to ignore the contrast between him and David Warner.

The disgraced duo, along with Cameron Bancroft, made their return to the Test arena following bans for their part in the 2018 ball-tampering scandal that rocked Australian cricket in the pressure cooker of an Ashes series in England.

While Smith was rightfully the recipient of widespread adoration as all of England and the rest of the cricketing world pondered the question "how do you get Steve Smith out?", Warner remained the pantomime villain and was unable to silence the jeers as he endured a miserable series.

Only twice did Warner go beyond single figures, with his highest score a 61 in the Headingley Test. His contribution to that incredible match long forgotten by the time Ben Stokes struck the four that completed one of the greatest fightbacks and most remarkable innings in Test history.

The redemption Smith enjoyed as he carried Australia in a series that saw them retain the urn was not forthcoming for Warner. He was excellent in the World Cup and finished as the second-highest run scorer but was unfortunate to achieve that feat in a tournament where Australia were emphatically beaten by an England side that prevailed in a final considered among the best games of all time.

Yet any Australian still bearing a grudge over Warner's indiscretions in South Africa must now surely grant him his absolution after an innings for the ages in the second Test with Pakistan.

Those inside the Adelaide Oval may have expected to see Australia pile on the runs. It was a fair assumption, given they closed day one on 302-1 with Warner on 166 and Marnus Labuschagne on 126.

However, few may have anticipated Warner etching his name into the history books and overtaking Don Bradman, the man many consider to be the best to play the game, with the highest ever score at the famous old ground. 

It may have come against a youthful Pakistan side able to harness much on a pitch offering little for the bowlers, but the exuberance and variety with which he attacked the challenge of becoming the seventh Australian to score 300 provided a wonderful encapsulation of his qualities as a batsman.

He was extremely fortunate to earn a reprieve as he slashed to gully from a Muhammad Musa no-ball on 234, but this was Warner at his free-flowing and aggressive best, and he celebrated reaching 200 and then 300 in typical fashion, bounding into the air with reckless abandon.

Warner racked up 39 fours and a singular six but he surpassed 334, the highest Test score of the legendary Bradman - one equalled by Mark Taylor against the same opposition in 1998 - in more sedate fashion, with a drive to sweeper cover for a single.

Taylor rose to applaud the achievement and captain Tim Paine promptly called for a declaration with Australia 589-3. Warner, perhaps recognising the magnitude of the occasion, left the field and bowed as he took in the acclaim of the Adelaide crowd.

There will be debate over whether Paine was right to declare with Warner in incredible form and well set to challenge Brian Lara's world-record score of 400. The skipper's call was vindicated in terms of the match situation, as Pakistan duly crumbled to 96-6.

Paine's decision and its merits are immaterial, though. Only Matthew Hayden stands above Warner on the list of highest individual scores by an Australian and, 20 months on from his lowest ebb, he can finally bask in his moment of redemption.

David Warner made history on Saturday as he progressed to 335 not out - the highest score at Adelaide Oval - in Australia's second Test against Pakistan.

After Warner's stunning knock, which helped the dominant hosts post 589-3 declared before Pakistan slumped to 96-6, we look at the best Opta data relating to his performance.

 

- Warner's 335* is the second-highest individual score by an Australian in Test cricket, only bettered by Matthew Hayden's 380 against Zimbabwe in October 2003. Don Bradman and Mark Taylor compiled innings of 334 in 1930 and 1998 respectively.

- The Warner innings also yielded the 10th-highest score in Test history, a list topped by Brian Lara's unbeaten 400 against England in 2004.

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10 highest Test scores

400* - Brian Lara - West Indies v England, April 2004

380 - Matthew Hayden - Australia v Zimbabwe, October 2003

375 - Brian Lara - West Indies v England, April 1994

374 - Mahela Jayawardene - Sri Lanka v South Africa, July 2006

365* - Garfield Sobers - West Indies v Pakistan, February 1958

364 - Len Hutton - England v Australia, August 1938

340 - Sanath Jayasuriya - Sri Lanka v India, August 1997

337 - Hanif Mohammad - Pakistan v West Indies, January 1958

336* - Wally Hammond - England v New Zealand, March 1933

335* - David Warner - Australia v Pakistan, November 2019

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- The previous highest score at Adelaide Oval was an innings of 299 not out by Bradman against South Africa in 1932.

- Only three Australia players have passed 250 more than once in Test cricket. Warner and Michael Clarke have done so twice, while Bradman achieved the feat five times.

- Virender Sehwag (four) is the only opener to have made more 250+ scores than Warner in Tests. Warner is one of five men with two scores of 250 or more, along with Alastair Cook, Chris Gayle, Sanath Jayasuriya and Graeme Smith.

- Warner's 335* is the highest individual score in a men's day/night Test. The previous best was Azhar Ali's 302 not out against West Indies in October 2016.

David Warner never believed he was "losing it " as a batsman during his miserable Ashes series.

The Australia opener etched his name into the history books on Saturday as he struck an unbeaten 335 in the second Test against Pakistan at the Adelaide Oval.

In the process he became the seventh Australian to record a triple-century and overtook the highest score by the great Don Bradman (334) with an incredible innings that featured 39 fours and a six.

Only Matthew Hayden stands above Warner on the list of highest Test scores by an Australian, with his Herculean effort coming after an away Ashes series in which he surpassed single figures just twice.

Asked in a media conference if he ever felt he was losing it during his miserable run in England, an amused Warner replied: "Nah, never, never losing it. What kind of question is that?

"At the end of the day, you're going to have people who doubt you and, to be honest, through that whole campaign in that series, I always said I wasn't out of form, I was out of runs.

"I say this, not just in hindsight, but if I had my time again, I would have not changed my guard, I wouldn't have listened to some external noises, I would have backed myself more and batted where I have been here, outside off, leaving the ball patiently, getting my bat and pad closer together and under my nose. And I am capable of that.

"I just think in England you can get caught up in playing too much in front, especially with the way that I play. So I've had to regroup coming back from England.

"I've probably hit over three and a half to four thousand balls in the nets leading into Brisbane. And obviously here as well I've batted for a good two hours per session. It's not by chance that I've actually tightened all that up. I've actually been working really hard in the nets.

"Look, I've never doubted myself at all. It's one of those things where I'm a very confident person. Whether or not I'd scored these runs or didn't score my runs, I'd still hold my head up high and have that little smirk on my face that I always have."

Despite his historic performance, Warner still indicated he can still make improvements in terms of his focus at the crease.

"I think the last two Tests, I said in the last press conference it's probably the best I've ever batted, the most disciplined I've ever batted and the most patient I've ever batted," he added. 

"I just felt at ease, especially batting with Marnus [Labuschagne]. We were really talking about the game and I think sometimes I get carried away with talking about where I'm looking to score instead of what the bowler is actually doing and how he's trying to get me out.

"I think that will stay in the back of my mind now moving forward."

David Warner recorded the second-highest score in Australia Test history, compiling an incredible 335 not out during a remarkable day on which a series victory over Pakistan was all but secured.

Opener Warner, who made 154 in Australia's dominant victory in the series opener, surpassed Don Bradman's highest Test score by a single run in an historic performance on day two of the second rubber.

His herculean effort marked the largest individual Test score at the Adelaide Oval and lifted Australia to 589-3 declared before Pakistan quickly crumbled in response.

Save for the admirable efforts of Babar Azam (43 not out), the tourists provided precious little resistance and closed on 96-6, meaning anything other than an Australia victory in the match and the series is near impossible.

Australia had reached stumps on day one on 302-1, with Warner unbeaten on 166 and Marnus Labuschagne 126 not out.

Labuschagne added 36 more to his tally before being bowled by Shaheen Shah Afridi, but it proved a false dawn for those hoping for a Pakistan fightback.

Four balls after Labuschagne's departure, Warner brought up his double hundred by working a single to the leg side, and he continued in irrepressible form, ruthlessly taking advantage of a Pakistan attack that failed to harness any life or bounce from the surface.

Warner did receive a reprieve when he sliced to gully on 234, only for the delivery to be ruled a no-ball as Muhammad Musa overstepped his mark.

Steve Smith also made history by reaching 7,000 Test runs in his 126th Test innings, five fewer than previous record-holder Wally Hammond.

He fell for 36, but Pakistan never crafted another opportunity to end Warner's innings, which encompassed 39 fours and one maximum.

Warner, now supported by Matthew Wade (38 not out) became the seventh Australian to join the 300 club as he pulled a Mohammad Abbas short ball wide of mid-on for four.

He ran off leaping into the air in celebration and more history was to come for the left-hander, who surpassed 334 - the highest Test score achieved by the great Don Bradman - with a single by driving to sweeper cover.

Captain Tim Paine promptly declared, with Warner bowing the crowd as he took in their acclaim, and those privileged to be at the Adelaide Oval were given plenty more to celebrate as the tourists wilted in the face of the Australia attack.

Imam-ul-Haq went in the fifth over to Mitchell Starc, who did the majority of the damage with the ball by taking 4-22. Babar was the only Pakistan batsman to display any kind of composure and his team-mates' inexplicable tendency to chase wide deliveries gave Starc the wickets of Iftikhar Ahmed and Mohammad Rizwan in the same over.

Six wickets down, Pakistan faced the ignominy of being bowled out before the close. They avoided doing so, but a tour in which they have failed to win a single match will surely end in a massive defeat after Warner etched his name into the history books.

New Zealand's score of 375 in the second and final Test was arguably "300 under par", according to England bowler Stuart Broad.

England endured a tough day in the field at Hamilton's Seddon Park as a sixth-wicket partnership of 124 between BJ Watling and Daryl Mitchell frustrated them after two wickets fell in the morning session.

Broad finally ended their stand, removing each batsman within the space of four overs, though New Zealand's tail wagged and cameos from Mitchell Santner (23) and Tim Southee (18) added valuable runs.

New Zealand's hopes of clinching the two-match series 2-0 were furthered when England lost Dom Sibley and Joe Denly cheaply in their 18 overs before the close. Rory Burns and Joe Root reached stumps with England 39-2.

The Black Caps won the first Test by an innings and 65 runs on the back of a score of 615-9, and Broad believes their failure to do the same again on a batting-friendly surface means England are in a decent position.

"We won the toss and bowled – not to bowl New Zealand out for 150, we were aiming [to dismiss them] for 330-350 and then bat big once to try and win the game," said Broad.

"We thought our best chance to take 20 wickets in five days was by bowling first.

"These pitches, you've got to change your mindset a little bit. If you win the toss and bowl in England and concede 370 you'd be distraught, but here the opportunity is to bat big and bat big once.

"For us to win this game, we'll need a batter to get 150 plus, and someone else to get 100, and leave ourselves a day to bowl them out on day five. That's how New Zealand won the last test they played [in Hamilton], when they got [715]-6. So arguably, they're 300 under par.

"When you come away from home you look at what the opposition do in their home conditions – and New Zealand bowl. It's pretty rare that they win the toss and bat.

"It will be proven if it was a good decision tomorrow [Sunday] really – if we bat through the whole of tomorrow and go past New Zealand, we can apply some pressure on them in the second innings. If we don't go and get 400, we can't.

"I think our opportunity is there tomorrow. There's not a huge amount of pressure, there's not a lot happening in the pitch, there's not a big scoreboard pressure – there's a chance for a couple of people to get hundreds tomorrow.

"We need someone to go and get a big hundred for us to win this game – and we've got the players to do it."

David Warner became just the seventh Australian to make a triple-century in Tests as the opener continued to dominate Pakistan on Saturday.

The left-hander reached 300 on day two of the second Test at the Adelaide Oval thanks to his 37th four.

Warner joined Donald Bradman (twice), Bob Simpson, Bob Cowper, Mark Taylor, Matthew Hayden and Michael Clarke as Australians to reach the milestone.

It was the first time an Australia batsman had made 300 since January 2012, when Clarke achieved the feat against India in Sydney.

Warner finished with an unbeaten 335 as Australia declared at 589-3.

England were left in trouble after losing a pair of wickets late on day two of the second Test against New Zealand on Saturday.

The Black Caps were bowled out for 375 in their first innings after something of a collapse at Seddon Park in Hamilton.

Debutant Daryl Mitchell (73) and BJ Watling (55) guided New Zealand after Tom Latham's century, but the hosts – who lead the two-Test series 1-0 – lost their final five wickets for just 60.

Stuart Broad (4-73) was the pick of the bowlers but, just as England seemed boosted by that strong finish, the Black Caps hit back.

Dom Sibley (4) and Joe Denly (4) fell before stumps, leaving England at 39-2 and still trailing by 336 runs with Rory Burns (24) and Joe Root (6) unbeaten.

Sibley had been hit in the helmet by Tim Southee (1-24) before falling to the paceman, who trapped him lbw.

Burns was given a life on 10 as Ross Taylor put down a catch at first slip off Matt Henry.

But New Zealand would strike again, Watling diving low to his right to remove Denly off Henry (1-10) to cap a fine day for the hosts.

Earlier, England had made a fine start to day two as Latham (105) and Henry Nicholls (16) – the overnight batsmen – departed early.

But Mitchell and Watling led the response for New Zealand, putting together a 124-run partnership as they frustrated the tourists.

The Black Caps scored just 67 runs during the second session, although the departure of Watling – removed by a great Broad bouncer – just before tea triggered a collapse of sorts.

England managed to contain New Zealand to 375, but the fall of Sibley and Denly has left them on the back foot.

A timely four-for from left-arm spinner Ashmead Nedd eased the Windies Emerging Players to a 3-wicket win over Barbados, via the D/L method, and into the final of the Colonial Medical Insurance Super50 Cup.

In the low-scoring semi-final at the Queen’s Park Oval, the Emerging Players won the toss before putting the Pride in to bat.  The Barbados unit were immediately on the backfoot with opener Leniko Boucher (5) caught by Joshua Da Silva off the bowling of Keon Harding in the second over.  Nedd removed Kjorn Ottley, who did not score, in the next over to leave the Pride struggling at 7 for 2.

Zachary McCaskie attempted to repair some of the damage, with a patient 40 from 61 balls but the Pride continued to lose wickets at regular intervals before being all out for 112.  Nicholas Kirton added 26 from 49, with Ashley Nurse contributing 25 from 20.  The Emerging players began cautiously with a low target but lost Leonardo Julien and Yannic Cariah with 24 runs on the board. 

Joshua Da Silva and Roland Cato came together to stem the loss of early wickets and took the score to 76 for 4 before Da Silva was caught by Tevyn Walcott for 27.  Three power cuts, the last coming at 9:20 pm led to a revised target, with the Emerging Players asked 11 runs to win from eight overs.  It wasn’t without its difficulties as lost another wicket with the score at 100 to find themselves at 100 for 7 but Roland Cato, who hit an unbeaten 25 and Keon Harding (9) got them home with four overs and two balls to spare.

Abhimanyu Mithun produced a remarkable over in the semi-final of the Syed Mushtaq Ali Trophy as he claimed five wickets in his team's victory.

The 30-year-old Karnataka seamer, who represented India in four Tests and five one-day internationals between 2010 and 2011, went for 37 runs in his opening three overs but came back with a bang.

He picked up four wickets from his first four balls, bowled a wide and gave up a single before removing Jayant Yadav with the final ball of Haryana's innings to cap a remarkable over.

His victims on Friday included India veteran Amit Mishra, whose team ended up losing by eight wickets as KL Rahul and Devdutt Padikkal both made half-centuries to help Karnataka chase down 195 with five overs to spare.

Mithun claimed a hat-trick in the final of the Vijay Hazare Trophy earlier this year and is the first bowler to take a hat-trick in all three of India's domestic tournaments.

Marnus Labuschagne could scarcely believe how well Australia's day against Pakistan went as he and David Warner posted both centuries to leave them firmly on top in the second Test.

Warner and Labuschagne each recorded hundreds in the first Test, when Australia won by an innings and five runs, and the two continued their fine form with an unbeaten second-wicket stand of 294 in Adelaide on Friday.

That partnership - already the highest in day-night Tests - meant Australia reached stumps at 302-1 as Warner ended the day unbeaten on 166 while Labuschagne was not out on 126.

The latter had made a career-best 185 in the opening match of the series and was pinching himself after making his second career hundred in his very next innings.

"It's a bit surreal," he said in his on-pitch interview as he walked off with Warner.

"It's just amazing to be out here with Davey and put on a big partnership. Really happy with that.

"We were running hard, [I] almost ran myself out there at the end.

"I love the intensity at the crease and how hard we ran. It was real fun."

Warner, who reached three figures for the 23rd time in his Test career, was delighted to see Australia's number three extend his purple patch.

Labuschagne has so far scored 793 Test runs in 2019, more than any other batsman in the world.

"His knock up at Queensland was outstanding," Warner added.

"Credit to him, he started where he left off at the Gabba."

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