Joe Root praised Stuart Broad and Ben Stokes after the duo were influential in helping England level the Test series against West Indies.

Stokes followed up his knock of 176 in the first innings with an unbeaten 78 that allowed England to set up the opportunity to push for victory on the final day, as he added quick runs on the fifth morning.

The all-rounder then picked up two wickets - including crucially ending Jermaine Blackwood's resistance on 55 - as West Indies, chasing an unlikely 312 for victory, were bowled out for 198.

Root acknowledged match-winning contributions are becoming a common occurrence from his vice-captain, telling Sky Sports after the triumph at Old Trafford: "It doesn't surprise me.

"You watch how Ben goes about his business in practice whether it be practice, fitness or anything, he leads the way in many respects.

"He seems to want to keep getting better and better and we're seeing those results out on the field as well.

"It's great for a lot of the younger guys to see that, you've got to put the hard yards in, he certainly does that and we're starting to see that feed into the rest of the team, which is a great place to be."

Broad had boosted the home team's hopes on the final morning of the second Test with three top-order wickets, having also previously produced a devastating new-ball burst in West Indies' first innings.

The seamer was a surprise omission from England's line-up for the opening Test in Southampton - a game West Indies won by four wickets - but, asked to lead a new-look pace attack, he seized his opportunity in Manchester.

Broad had spoken publicly about his disappointment at missing out at the Rose Bowl, with Root not surprised to see him go out and back up his words on the field.

"You always expect that from Stuart. Generally, when he says something, he goes out there and produces a performance to back it up," Root said. 

"He's led the attack brilliantly this week and, as we've always said, you feel like he's got a lot of cricket left to play in him.

"Once he gets that ball in his hand, there's always that spell in him that can turn a game. He did that this week."

Stokes cut short his 15th over in West Indies' second innings due to an apparent fitness issue but insisted afterwards he was fine. The series finale starts on Friday at the same venue.

"The body just started to get quite stiff," he said to Sky Sports after being named player of the match. "I said to Broady, 'My body is starting to get quite stiff, what do you reckon?' and he just said to stop.

"I remember three or four years ago against Pakistan I had the same thing and ended up blowing my calf, so I didn't want to take that risk."

Stuart Broad and Ben Stokes rounded off magnificent individual performances to fire England to a series-levelling second Test win over West Indies by 113 runs.

The hosts, 1-0 down following the opening game of the three-match rubber in Southampton, needed quick runs in order to set a substantial target with enough time to bowl the Windies out, and star all-rounder Stokes duly obliged in a stunning assault.

When the declaration came at 129-3, Stokes – promoted to open – had bludgeoned an unbeaten 78 from 57 deliveries to stand alongside his mammoth first-innings 176.

It meant the tourists required 312 for victory, a target that soon became nominal after Broad (3-42) ripped through their top order.

Shamarh Brooks (62) and Jermaine Blackwood (55) struck stylish knocks in a 100-run stand for the fifth wicket, but the irrepressible Stokes (2-30) bounced out the latter, setting up the England attack for a relentless push towards victory after tea.

The West Indies are in danger of losing the second Test in #raisethebat Series at Old Trafford, in Manchester.

At lunch on the final day, the West Indies have already lost their openers and Shai Hope with just 25 runs on the board but more importantly, still with 74 overs to face and 287 runs to get.

England only batted for 11 overs of the morning session as Ben Stokes went into limited-overs mode to help them push their lead to 311 before a declaration 11 overs into the day.

Stokes was unbeaten on 78 off 57 balls as England declared on 129-3, giving the hosts 85 overs to bowl out the West Indies and tie the three-match series at 1-1. They will have two new balls to get the victory.

Any result looks possible on the final day — as was the case in the first Test in Southampton last week, when the Windies won by four wickets after chasing down 200 for victory.

West Indies' aim will likely be survival, though, with the victory target of 312 unlikely.

Stokes smashed two sixes over long-off as the big-hitting allrounder and England captain Joe Root put on 53 runs in the first 43 balls of the morning before Root was run out for 22 — effectively sacrificing his own wicket to get Stokes back on strike.

Now alongside Ollie Pope (12 not out), Stokes still had time to slog Jason Holder down the ground for another six, pushing the lead past 300, before Root called them back in.

By then, England had made 92 runs off 66 balls.

The second new ball will be available for England after 80 overs.

John Campbell, 4, was the first to go, going caught behind off the bowling of Stuart Broad, while his opening partner Kraigg Brathwaite was trapped on the crease off the bowling of Chris Woakes for 12.

Shai Hope’s struggles with the bat have also continued as Broad got a delivery to nip back at him, taking the top of off stump, with the batsman hapless after his decision to play back to a fullish delivery.

Roston Chase, yest to score, and Shamarh Brooks, 2, are the batsmen at the crease.

West Indies batsman Shamarh Brooks has admitted it was crucial for the team to bat as long as possible, as the battle for the second Test raged on, during the fourth day on Sunday.

Chasing a sizeable 469 and with one day rained out, the Windies needed at least 270 to ensure England did at least bat again.  A battling knock of 68 from 137 balls by Brooks went on a long way in ensuring the team got to 287, on the back of a devastating new-ball spell from England pace bowler Stuart Broad.

Brooks also featured in two key partnerships.  He paired with opener Kraigg Brathwaite for 76 runs and with middle-order batsman Roston Chase for 43.  With England back at crease, 219 runs ahead, but two wickets down thanks to impressive late evening bowling by Kemar Roach, all eyes will be focused on how many runs the team will feel is needed to feel comfortable before putting the West Indies back in to bat.

“Yesterday being rained out we knew it was a crucial day lost in this Test match.  We knew the situation was just having to come today and bat for as long as possible,” Brooks told members of the media, via a Zoom press conference, at the end of the day’s play.

“Yes, it is England's game and we knew that saving the follow-on was important but the more time that we batted today is the harder it made it for England to get a result out of this game,” he added.

 

Stuart Broad showed England what they had been missing with a thrilling Old Trafford burst that transformed the second Test against West Indies.

Former West Indies T20 captain, Carlos Brathwaite, says that while he understands that everybody, sports stars or not, has a life to live, he is still disappointed with Jofra Archer.

Brathwaite was speaking about Archer’s decision to visit his home in between the first and second Test in the #raisethebat Series against the West Indies.

Archer’s decision saw him miss the second Test which is headed to day four after Saturday was rained out.

The England pacer was fined by the English Cricket Board on Saturday but can play in the third Test if he tests negative for COVID-19.

For me, as a personal friend, I'm disappointed, not only in what Jofra's done but the scrutiny you get from the media,” said Brathwaite. 

According to Brathwaite, Archer has not done any favours to his image, though he believes the paceman is generally misunderstood.

“There has been talk before about his attitude and his laissez-faire way of going about things, which often discredits what he does on the field,” said Brathwaite.

“I just want to see his cricket do the talking, more than the concerns - which I think are misplaced - about his character. His tweeting, his social media, his quirky posts: that is Jofra Archer,” said Brathwaite.

Still, Brathwaite believes that there needs to be less pressure on athletes to be perfect and it must be remembered they are humans.

“As a cricketer myself, there are things outside of cricket that people would not agree with. People look to cricketers to set examples in life.

“He's not there for your son or daughter to look up to. He's there to live his life and do what he does best,” said Brathwaite.

The all-rounder wants it to be understood though, that even though he believes sportsmen get too much of a hard time, Archer still needs to be more responsible.

“That said, it does not excuse what he does. It's disappointing for me, as a personal friend, the backlash he will get.”

Three Bangladesh players, Mustafizur Rahman, Tamim Iqbal, and Mahmudullah, have declined invitations to the Hero Caribbean Premier League (CPL) because of concerns over COVID-19 and to show loyalty the country’s domestic league.

According to Tamim, the journey to the CPL, which is set for August 18 in Trinidad and Tobago, is long and would keep him away from his family, making it difficult to respond to emergencies.

Due to the COVID-19 there is travel restriction and route to West Indies is very long. Say I make it to the islands but there is an emergency in my family, I will not be able to return easy. I do not want to take that chance,” said Tamim.

There is also the issue of figuring out when Bangladesh’s domestic cricket will restart. The last game was played in March and it is still unknown when a restart is likely but Tamim, in particular, wants to be available when it does.

“The tournament [Dhaka Premier League] is suspended but as you know, we all are waiting for it to resume which can happen any time,” said Tamim.

Mahmudullah and Tamim have played in the CPL before, the former for the Jamaica Tallawahs and the Bangladesh captain for the St Lucia Zouks.

West Indies fast-bowling legend has laid into Jofra Archer after the England pacer flouted the bio-secure protocols and was dropped from the team for the second Test in the #raisethebat series at Old Trafford.

There was no play on today’s third day because of persistent rain, with England having batted for the majority of the two days prior.

With the West Indies leading the series 1-0, scores in the second Test are England 469-9 declared and the West Indies 32-1.

“I have no sympathy at all. I don't understand why people can't just do what is required,' Holding said during an interview with Sky Sports.

According to the Sky Sports commentator and pundit, the sacrifices the teams have had to make to make the series a reality are relatively small and should not elicit actions such as Archer’s.

Archer, during his trip from Southampton where the first Test was played to Manchester for the second, rerouted to his house before making his way to the venue.

The pacer was forced to miss the Test as he had to self-quarantine and has since been fined by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) ahead of the possibility of playing in the third Test should he test negative for COVID-19.

“Talking about sacrifices - Nelson Mandela spent 27 years in a little cell and he did nothing wrong - that is a sacrifice,” said Holding.

Holding did not have kind words for the ECB either, suggesting they hadn’t thought all the protocols for the series out well enough.

“Why aren't the England team travelling on a bus? If they have already passed the COVID test and everyone is together, they have six matches and are moving from one venue to another, why aren't they just all on a bus?” Holding questioned.

“Why are they allowed to travel by car? People need to just think a bit,” said Holding.

England were frustrated by rain as no play was possible on day three of the second Test against West Indies at Old Trafford.

Wet weather in Manchester prevented Joe Root's side from making further inroads after reducing the Windies to 32-1 in reply to 469-9 declared on Friday.

A more positive forecast for days four and five will give England hope they can still level the series, having gone down by four wickets in the first Test in Southampton last week.

The Windies are bidding for a first series victory in England in the longest format since 1988.

Jofra Archer has been fined an undisclosed amount and given a written warning for breaching England's bio-secure team protocols by visiting his home.

The England pace bowler, who claimed figures of 3-106 in the first Test against the West Indies, was dropped for the second Test after it emerged he broke rules aimed at reducing the risk of coronavirus infection.

Archer said he was "extremely sorry" for putting "the whole team and management in danger" through an unsanctioned visit to his home in Hove on Monday.

The 25-year-old is expected to rejoin the squad on Tuesday, July 21, after the second Test against the West Indies at Old Trafford is concluded.

In a statement, the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) said: "Following a disciplinary hearing held on Friday, July 17, England cricketer Jofra Archer has been fined an undisclosed amount and received an official written warning after admitting to breaching the team's bio-secure protocols on Monday July 13 when he made an unauthorised visit to his home in Hove.

"Archer was withdrawn from England's second Test squad against West Indies at Emirates Old Trafford and is commencing five days of isolation at the venue. He will undergo two COVID-19 tests in this period, which have to test negative before his self-isolation period is lifted. He is due to rejoin the rest of the squad on Tuesday July 21.

"The hearing was chaired by Ashley Giles, Managing Director, England Men's Cricket and included Archer's agent and a representative from the Professional Cricketers' Association."

The West Indies won the first of the three-match series in Southampton by four wickets.

West Indies all-rounder, Roston Chase, insists he will be ready to go when needed again, after a stern examination of his fitness levels bowling against England on Friday.

The spinner bowled some 44 overs but was rewarded after claiming figures of 5 for 172, his second big wicket haul against England.  Against England in the Caribbean last year, Chase claimed eight wickets.  The hard miles put into the bowling effort has, however, had a telling effect on the all-rounder.

“I can tell you right now my shoulder is very, very sore. It’s very tight as well. I was actually just getting a massage before coming to this press conference,” Chase told members of the media via a Zoom press conference, at the end of play on Friday.

Chase’s role for the team isn’t over by a long shot, as the player is likely to be called on to contribute with the bat as well.  In the first Test, a four-wicket win for the West Indies, Chase played a crucial role in steadying the team in both innings.  Coming in at four in the first innings, the all-rounder made 47 but faced 142 balls.  In the second, he scored 37 runs but faced 88 balls.  The player insists that despite the soreness, he will be ready again when called upon to play what could be a crucial role for the team.

“It’s about managing your body and having the willpower and mindset to come back every day, you might have a little niggle or whatnot, but it’s just that mindset to come back and do it again.”

West Indies all-rounder Roston Chase has admitted he relishes the challenge of facing England, after another strong performance, on an otherwise difficult day.

Chase ended day two with another solid haul against the Englishmen, this time grabbing figures of 5 for 172, as England posted a sizeable 469 for 9 declared.  Chase, who has bowled 44 overs, accounted for the top three batsmen, which included Rory Burns, Dom Sibley, and Zak Crawley before accounting for Ollie Pope and Sam Curran.  The other wickets were claimed by Kemar Roach, Alzarri Joseph and Jason Holder.

The innings was the second big haul for the spinner, who also rattled the then visitors with an impressive 8 for 60 when the teams played in the Caribbean last year.

“It’s my second five-wicket haul, following up on the eight-wicket haul in Barbados.  I do tend to do well against them, even in 2017, even though England is not normally a place where spin bowlers dominate,” Chase told members of the media via a Zoom press conference.

Chase was used sparingly in the 2017 series in England, when he again managed to pick up a few wickets.  The player, however, hopes for even more success.

“I still think I have to find a way to get more wickets.”

 

Patience will be key to the West Indies innings at bat says Roston Chase, advising his teammates to take a page from the innings of England’s Dom Sibley.

On Friday, England declared their first innings in the second Test of the #raisethebat Series at Old Trafford on 469-9 thanks to innings from their vice-captain Ben Stokes, 176, and opener Dom Sibley, 120.

Sibley and Stokes were patient in compiling their respective innings, the former facing 372 deliveries for a strike rate of 32.26. Stokes was a little more adventurous, scoring at 49.44.

Chase eventually removed Sibley, the opener counting as one of his five wickets after 44 overs of bowling.

“I would say the approach should be to play each ball on merit,” said Chase. “Just take a page out of the English players’ book, especially Sibley and how patient he was and just really waited on the bowlers to come into his areas and score,” he said.

Chase was also cognizant of the way the pair ran between the wickets, always keeping the pressure on the West Indies to field well and thought this was something his West Indies teammates should also take onboard.

“I thought that they ran really well between the wickets so that is something that we can take from them as well and just stay patient,” said Chase.

The West Indies, in their reply, are 32-1, with opener John Campbell back in the pavilion for 12.

Campbell struck a couple of handsome drives but then misread the line of a delivery from Sam Curran to fall leg before.

Alzarri Joseph, the night watchman is not out on 14, while opener Kraigg Brathwaite is on six.

Come tomorrow, Chase wants the two to “just take that leaf from their book and play each ball on merit and when the opportunity comes to score, just score and go about cricket the normal way, run hard between the wickets.”

The West Indies lead the #raisethebat Series for the Wisden Trophy 1-0 and could secure their hold on the trophy with a draw in the second Test.

The West Indies performed admirably with the ball and in the field, despite a 162-over-long sojourn thanks to some dogged batting from England after two days of the second #raisethebat Test at Old Trafford on Friday.

England skipper Joe Root gave the signal to declare the innings on 469-9 just about an hour before close of play but before that, the side’s vice-captain, Ben Stokes, 176, and opener Dom Dibley, 120, made the West Indies toil.

Chase, himself, bowled a mammoth 44 overs to claim 5-143, while pacers Kemar Roach, 2-58, Alzarri Joseph and Holder, 1-70, offered support with their wickets.

In reply, the West Indies have already lost the services of John Campbell, after Sam Curran trapped him leg before for 12. Opener Kraigg Brathwaite, 6, and Joseph, the night watchman, 14, are the batsmen at the crease, with the West Indies 32-1.

“Most teams being out there for 160-odd overs you would begin to see the tiredness and the lines and lengths start to go wrong, but we didn’t let it get away from us. We still kept the run rate to under three and that was our aim from the beginning,” said Chase.

A large part of that were the 32 overs bowled by Roach. The pacer went at a miserly 1.76 runs per over even though he didn’t get among the wickets til late in the day when he had Stokes caught behind attempting a reverse sweep, and Woakes caught at slip with a peach of a delivery with the very next ball.

“We didn’t get wickets in clusters or really fast like we did in the first game but we stuck to the game plan and stuck to the task,” said Chase.

The West Indies were in for a surprise after believing they could get the most out of the wicket on day one under gloomy skies and with some moisture from rainy days still affecting the pitch.

“I thought the conditions played a big role in us deciding to bowl first. Outside was very overcast and dark, the lights were on before play even started, and having the success we had in the first game as well, everyone was down for the decision to bowl first. But as I said, the English batters played tremendously so kudos to them,” said Chase.

There were a few instances when things looked to be falling apart for the West Indies toward the end of the England innings.

Roach dropped a catch, pushing his effort over the ropes for six, Shannon Gabriel missed an easy run out, having caught the return but failed to make contact with the stumps, as well as a couple of other misfields.

Those instances, though, Chase explained are bound to occur after such a long time in the field.

We made a few blunders in the field which is going to happen when you’re out there for that long because your body is under tremendous strain but all in all I think it was a good effort from the guys,” said Chase.

Ben Stokes vowed the England team would support Jofra Archer after the bowler's coronavirus breach saw him excluded for the second Test against West Indies.

Archer, one of the heroes of England's Cricket World Cup triumph last July, made an unauthorised trip home between the first and second Tests to see an unnamed person, breaking the protocols put in place for the games at bio-secure arenas.

England announced Archer would need to self-isolate for five days and could therefore not take his place in the XI when the second Test began at Old Trafford on Thursday.

The team's managing director Ashley Giles claimed "it could have been a disaster" that cost the England and Wales Cricket Board "tens of millions of pounds" as international cricket adjusts amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Yet Stokes - himself no stranger to attracting headlines away from the field following a fight in Bristol in 2017 - stressed Archer will not be hung out to dry by the squad.

"I think from us as players and as England Cricket group, this is a time where our way of operating really needs to come through," said Stokes, who was later cleared of affray following the incident in Bristol.

"We really need to be there to support Jofra right now because obviously he's a big talking point.

"Obviously he is by himself because of everything else going on at the moment but it's making sure he doesn't feel like he's by himself. The worst thing we can do right now as a team is to just sort of leave him and see him in five or six days' time and then say, 'Alright'.

"Times like these for people are very, very tough and you can feel like you are all by yourself but I don't think anybody is going to allow that to happen.

"Jofra is a massive part of this group, as everybody is. If it was anybody else bar Jofra it would be the exact same way of handling it that we would do as a team.

"It's all good being there for people when things are going well but what really comes through is how you operate with someone when they need you the most."

Stokes was once again instrumental on the second day at Old Trafford, scoring 176 - his 10th Test century - as England made 469-9 declared before having West Indies 32-1 in the 14 overs before stumps.

The all-rounder made 260 alongside opener Dom Sibley, whose patient 120 might have silenced some critics following his struggles in Southampton, where he was out for a duck but went on to make a second-innings half-century.

"It's great signs for us going forward that all the noise around him after Southampton literally hasn't affected him whatsoever," Stokes added.

"It's a great way to respond to any criticism that there was by going out and banging 100."

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