Jason Roy has been dropped from England's side for the final Ashes Test at The Oval after his poor form throughout the series, with Ben Stokes passed fit to bat.

Roy has failed to establish himself, either as an opener alongside Rory Burns or when switched to number four for the Old Trafford Test.

The 29-year-old's highest score came in Manchester, when he made 31 as England desperately attempted to keep the series alive, to no avail, and Roy has now made way for Sam Curran.

Craig Overton proved resilient with the bat in England's second innings at Old Trafford before he was eventually dismissed by Josh Hazlewood, but the Somerset bowler has been replaced by Chris Woakes.

Stokes will play as a specialist batsman, with the all-rounder unable to bowl due to a shoulder injury.

Australia captain Tim Paine confirmed one change to his 12-man squad, with Mitchell Marsh replacing Travis Head.

England team for fifth Ashes Test: Joe Root (c), Jofra Archer, Jonny Bairstow (wk), Stuart Broad, Rory Burns, Jos Buttler, Sam Curran, Joe Denly, Jack Leach, Ben Stokes, Chris Woakes.

England have turned to Craig Overton for the crucial fourth Ashes Test against Australia at Old Trafford, with Chris Woakes the man to miss out.

Speaking at the pre-match news conference on Tuesday, captain Joe Root confirmed Somerset's tall seamer Overton, 25, will feature in a five-day match for the first time since March 2018.

The hosts' batting struggles have been more pronounced, but all-rounder Woakes will drop out of the attack having taken just two wickets at Headingley across 22 overs and scoring a combined six runs with the bat.

Overton has featured in three Tests for England and he dismissed current Australia quartet Steve Smith, David Warner, Tim Paine and Pat Cummins in the last Ashes series.

"At this ground, I think it does perform differently, an extra bit of bounce that a tall bowler gives you, I think that balances out our attack in these sorts of conditions," said Root.

"[Overton] is a competitor. We saw him come into Ashes cricket on debut and straight away looked at home, got himself in a battle and I expect him to do just that this week.

"He's got good control, good skills and can move the ball off straight and I expect him to cause some issues for the Aussie batters."

Though the series is level at 1-1, the manner of England's incredible one-wicket victory at Headingley in the third Test suggests the momentum will be with Root's team at Old Trafford.

"You come off the back of a win like that, it's a big win for the whole squad - for it to happen in the way it did, for us to turn up here with confidence and very much alive in this series," added Root.

"The way we played the week before at Lord's, it started to feel like we were wresting our way back into the series.

"Last week I think we made quite a lot of mistakes and we didn't get it right but through some individual brilliance and resistance in our batting in the second innings, and high-quality bowling throughout - bar the odd spell here and there - we still managed to win in a way

"If we can bring those two performances together it feels like we'll be in a really good place this week as well."

Chris Woakes has conceded he doubted even Ben Stokes could turn the tide in the third Ashes Test between England and Australia at Headingley.

Stokes amassed an incredible 135 not out and led a 76-run stand for the last wicket alongside number 11 Jack Leach as the hosts, who were all out for 67 in their first innings, chased down an unlikely target of 359 to level the series at 1-1 on Sunday.

Woakes witnessed a similarly superb performance from Stokes in a dramatic Cricket World Cup final victory over New Zealand in July, though he thought England's chances of keeping the Ashes alive in Leeds were all but over.

"I've seen Ben do some incredible things on the cricket field but I thought this one was just out of reach for him to be honest," Woakes told the BBC's Stumped programme.

"I thought he was done, it was done, and when the score starts creeping down to about 50 to win you start thinking, 'What if I'd been able to build a little bit of a partnership and get a bit closer?'

"We were kind of resigned to the fact that it was pretty much done.

"It was a very nervous and tense dressing room, and the closer Stokesy and Jack got the more tense it got, because we started thinking it was possible, which is a dangerous place to be."

England made their way back onto the field several hours after the game, and Woakes believes it was important to revel in the achievement.

"We went onto the outfield as a team to share the moment," he said.

"Although we realise it's mid-series, it was important to realise how special that game actually was, for Stokesy to do something unbelievable and incredible and you probably won't see that again."

Ben Stokes' remarkable heroics at Headingley mean the Ashes series is all square at 1-1 with two to play.

But beyond what can reasonably be considered among the greatest Test innings of all time in one of the most remarkable finales in the history of cricket's longest format, there is plenty for England and Australia to consider.

The flaws of both teams have contributed to the undulating drama of this series every bit as much as individual brilliance on each side.

Before they reconvene at Old Trafford next week, here are some selection quandaries England and Australia must ponder.

ENGLAND

Roy's race is run

While Stokes has transferred his golden Cricket World Cup form to the Test format, the punt on white-ball specialist Jason Roy bringing his talents to bear at the top of the England order has failed to come off.

A best of 28 has been followed by four consecutive failures to reach double figures, with muddled footwork and a lost off stump making it seem cruel to ask Roy to keep on facing the new ball. Dropping into the middle order, with Joe Denly promoted to open, is one option, though a spell out of the side feels kinder right now.

Should England want to bring in a new face alongside Rory Burns, Warwickshire's Dominic Sibley is the leading option thanks to three centuries and four fifties in the County Championship this season.

Buttler best left out?

Over the course of three Tests, Jos Buttler has edged down from five to seven in the England order. A gutsy second-innings 31 at Lord's is his only effort to recommend among a string of single-figure scores, even if he could do little about being run out by Headingley hero Stokes.

Surrey's Ollie Pope thumped an unbeaten double century against Hampshire earlier this month and looks ripe for a recall to the middle order in place of either Roy or Buttler.

Bowling at the James Anderson End… James Anderson?

Chris Woakes has become increasingly peripheral with the ball and Australia have nullified his all-round capabilities with short-pitched assaults. The identity of England's third seamer looks likely to change at Old Trafford.

James Anderson would love to feature at his home ground but must do more to prove his fitness in an outing with Lancashire's second XI this week.

Sam Curran would provide left-arm variety and accomplished batting from number eight in the order, yet may once again miss out on selection.

 

AUSTRALIA

Smith in for who?

Steve Smith could return from his concussion-enforced absence and the tourists are not short of candidates to make way.

Usman Khawaja is without a half-century in the series and his airy 23 during the second innings at Headingley stood as a jarring counterpoint to Marnus Labuschagne's application.

Travis Head and Matthew Wade might also need to help their cause in this week's tour match at Derbyshire.

Starc in for who?

Mitchell Starc has been a spectator so far but could be drafted into the XI to bowl on an Old Trafford surface well-suited to his talents.

The left-arm paceman's relative inability to bowl "dry" means he is an uneasy fit with Australia's overall gameplan, but his expertise against the tail would have been a huge asset in Leeds.

Taking out any seamer involved in rolling England for a first-innings 67 would be harsh, but James Pattinson would appear the most vulnerable.

Marsh an option to bolster attack

For the first time in the series, Australia's four-man attack looked tired as they wilted in the Headingley heat.

The lack of top-six batsmen emphatically stating their case could open the door to Mitchell Marsh. The all-rounder hit two centuries in the last Ashes series in Australia and his right-arm seam would ease the load on a supreme but now-wounded bowling unit.

Chris Woakes conceded England's players were concerned for Steve Smith's welfare after Jofra Archer struck Australia's star batsman with a brutal bouncer at Lord's.

Smith once again top scored for the tourists with 92 in 250 all out, a miserly first-innings deficit of eight that felt far less significant in the overall reckoning than England closing day four on 96 for four.

But the 30-year-old left the field as a precaution having ducked into a bouncer during a rapid spell from Test debutant Archer that struck him on the neck and left him prone on the turf.

It was a moment to evoke unwelcome memories of Phillip Hughes' tragic death in 2014 and, even though he was fielding in the deep, Woakes had no doubt over the severity of the incident.

"I was down at fine leg but you get a feel as a player when someone gets hit, by the noise more than anything," the all-rounder told a post-match news conference.

"You could hear it was more fleshy, around the neck. When that's the case you're immediately worried as a player.

"Jos [Buttler] at short leg was in straight away to check he was okay, which was nice to see. You don't wish that on anyone.

"For Steve to come back out after being hit the way he was shows courage and character. He's been incredible in this series."

Woakes eventually claimed the prized wicket of Smith amid figures of 3-61, trapping him lbw without playing a stroke.

"I suppose it is strange because he hasn’t left any on the stumps all series so far! He'd just come back out, he hoyed me over midwicket for a one-bounce four," he said when asked whether he felt Smith was out of sorts having returned to the field when the Warwickshire man had Peter Siddle caught behind.

"I don't know if he was trying to get to three figures as quickly as possible, I'm not too sure. It's a tough one to answer.

"He hasn't left one like that so far – I just thought it was a good piece of bowling!"

The spell that will live long in the memory, however, is Archer's astonishing stint after lunch, where he hit a top speed of 96.1 mph and also cracked Smith painfully on the left forearm.

"Not personally, on the field," Woakes replied when asked if he had ever witnessed a quicker piece of bowling.

"You see quick bowling around the world but that was a prolonged spell of fast bowling.

"I don't know what the average was he was up around [90 mph] every ball. The atmosphere in the crowd, you could tell that it was pretty special. The crowd were certainly behind every ball

"It was special to be a part of. I haven't been on the field when someone's bowled that quick consistently."

No further play was possible due to rain after England hit back by taking three wickets in the morning session on day three of the second Ashes Test at Lord's.

England went out under grey London skies on Friday needing to make inroads with Australia, 1-0 up after their victory at Edgbaston last week, 30-1 in reply to 258.

Cameron Bancroft became debutant Jofra Archer's first Test victim before Chris Woakes got rid of Usman Khawaja (36) and Stuart Broad (2-26) saw the back of Travis Head as three wickets tumbled for only 11 runs.

England failed to claim the prized scalp of former captain Steve Smith, but Australia were 80-4 - trailing by 178 - at lunch and poor weather prevented the players from taking to the field again on Friday.

A draw looks the most likely outcome after day one was washed out, but a more positive forecast for the weekend should ensure two extended days are not interrupted, giving both sides hope of forcing a win.

Left-hander Khawaja brought up Australia's 50 with a streaky boundary when Woakes was brought into the attack after Archer and Broad were unable to conjure an early breakthrough.

England skipper Joe Root persisted with World Cup star Archer (1-18) and the quick got a much-needed maiden Test wicket with a delivery which struck Bancroft (13) in front after nipping in sharply off the seam.

Umpire's call was the verdict after Bancroft signalled for a review and Woakes (1-27) got in on the act with the second ball of the next over, Khawaja nibbling behind to an excellent delivery which moved away.

Australia were 60-3 after losing two wickets without scoring a run and they were four down when Broad snared Travis Head (7) lbw, England successfully reviewing when Aleem Dar curiously opted not to raise his finger.

Ben Stokes caused an otherwise untroubled Smith problems and Matthew Wade overturned an lbw decision when on nought, after being given out from a ball from the England all-rounder which pitched outside leg stump.

Wade was still there, although yet to get off the mark from 23 balls faced and Smith - scorer of a century in both innings in the first Test - was 13 not out when lunch was called with rain falling, and that was it for the day.

Jofra Archer claimed his first Test wicket.as England struck three times in the morning session of what was forecast to be a rain-hit third day against Australia at Lord's.

The tourists dominated Thursday's play in the second Ashes Test as they targeted a 2-0 series lead, bowling England out for only 258 and closing on 30-1.

With wet weather expected for the rest of Friday, Joe Root's home side needed to do damage before lunch and duly reduced Australia to 80-4 at the interval.

Debutant Archer removed Cameron Bancroft before Chris Woakes saw off Usman Khawaja (38) and Travis Head fell to Stuart Broad, but England were unable to claim the prized scalp of Steve Smith (13 not), who scored a century in both innings in Australia's win at Edgbaston.

Left-hander Khawaja brought up the team's 50 with a streaky boundary when Woakes was brought into the attack after Archer and Broad struggled early on.

Root persisted with World Cup star Archer and the quick got a much-needed breakthrough with a delivery which struck Bancroft in front after nipping in sharply off the seam, umpire's call the verdict after the opener signalled for a review.

Woakes got in on the act with the second ball of the next over, Khawaja nibbling behind to an excellent delivery which moved away from the left-hander.

Australia were 60-3 after losing two wickets without scoring a run and they were four down when Broad snared Travis Head (7) lbw, England successfully reviewing when Aleem Dar curiously opted not to raise his finger.

Ben Stokes caused an otherwise untroubled Smith problems and Matthew Wade overturned an lbw decision when on nought, after being given out from a ball from the England all-rounder which pitched outside leg stump.

Wade, full of confidence after scoring a hundred in the first Test, was still there along with Smith when lunch was called with rain falling and a strong prospect there may not be any further play on Friday.

Chris Woakes does not appear to have much hope of "the best fast bowler who's ever lived" James Anderson being available to play a part on day four of the first Ashes Test at Edgbaston.

Though Anderson batted as England were bowled out for 374, giving them a first-innings lead of 90, he did not join the hosts as they returned to field on day three.

In his absence England reduced Australia to 124-3, the tourists 34 runs ahead when bad light stopped play, with Steve Smith unbeaten on 46 having rescued them with a remarkable 144 in the first innings.

England need to find a way of dislodging Smith if they are to set up a manageable run chase, and Woakes indicated they will have to do so without their leading Test wicket-taker.

Asked how he felt when he learned Anderson would not be on the field for Australia's second innings, Woakes told a media conference: "I was gutted for Jimmy, he's obviously dying to play more than anyone and wants to play more than anyone.

"But it wasn't right which was unfortunate for him and unfortunate for us as a team with him being the best fast bowler that's ever lived, in my opinion, with the amount of wickets he's taken and all that.

"[His absence] is a bit of a blow but at the same time us as a unit have to go out there and try to do the job.

"Moving forward, I actually don't know [whether he will be available on Sunday]. The fact he hasn't taken much part in the game so far doesn't look too promising but I actually don't know.

"It's a well-poised Ashes Test match. It's been a great Test match so far, reasonably even. We're pretty happy having them 30 for three.

"If we can start well in the morning, two big wickets up front could be quite crucial. All of a sudden if you have them 50 or 60 for five, it's a big turning point. Tomorrow morning, as always, is important."

Woakes put on a stand of 65 with Stuart Broad to help build a decent lead after England had lost four wickets for 18 runs and slumped to 300-8, and Woakes knows how vital those extra runs could prove.

"That partnership with Stuart, 60 runs or so, could be quite a big part of the game," he added.

"Pleased with the way we played and it was quite important we put on a partnership there because at that point it wasn't looking like we were getting too big of a lead."

Chris Woakes conceded England will have to go back to the drawing board to find a way to get Steve Smith out as the hosts seek to set up a manageable chase in the first Ashes Test with Australia.

England began day three at Edgbaston on 267-4 but a middle order collapse saw them bowled out for 374 in response to Australia's 284.

That first-innings lead of 90 would have been significantly more if not for Smith's remarkable 144 on day one, and he again proved immovable after England made early inroads in the second innings.

Australia were 27-2 after David Warner and Cameron Bancroft went cheaply, but Smith was unbeaten on 46 as Australia reached stumps on 124-3 with a lead of 34.

Smith is the key wicket for England in their quest to avoid having to chase a difficult total, and Woakes suggested they will have to devise a new plan to find it.

Asked by Sky Sports how to get Smith out, Woakes jokingly replied: "Have you got any ideas?

"He's obviously a world-class player and world-class players don't make mistakes, and Steve doesn't make too many mistakes.

"On a wicket like that, you almost have to build pressure, build pressure, build pressure and hope a batsman does make a mistake sometimes.

"I think we go back to the drawing board, have a look - on this surface, how is the best way to get him out, how to dry him up and also attack the other end as well.

"We probably didn't get our lengths exactly right, but at the same time, having them [effectively] 30-2, I think you'd probably still say we're slightly ahead."

Despite Woakes' assessment of the match situation, Australia seamer James Pattinson expressed satisfaction with where Australia are, the tourists having been 122-8 on the first day.

"To be in the position we are in now, I think we would have taken it [at the start of the day]," Pattinson told Sky Sports. 

"It could have gone either way. England being four down with only 17 runs behind, we could have let the game slip, but to our credit we went out there and took six for 100 and now we lead by a few."

Asked what lead Australia need to make England uncomfortable, Pattinson replied: "Anything over 150, I think, especially going into that last day on this wicket.

"I don't want to put a number on it but I think if we can just bat all day tomorrow and really grind England into the ground a little bit, see if we can get a decent lead and then put them in on the last day."

Stuart Broad and Chris Woakes put England in control of the first Ashes Test at Edgbaston as Australia collapsed to 154-8 in the second session of a day marked by unimpressive umpiring.

The tourists mounted something of a recovery after being reduced to 35-3 to reach 83-3 at lunch.

Australia added another 16 to that total before Travis Head (35) departed in the sixth over of the afternoon session, trapped in front by one that straightened from Woakes (3-35).

That wicket prompted a collapse in line with pre-series talk of both teams being short in the batting department, England's attack prospering even after James Anderson went for a scan on a tight calf.

However, England were denied the prized wicket of Steve Smith (66 not out), who successfully reviewed after being given out lbw not playing a shot.

Matthew Wade (1) departed in the next over when he was struck on the pad by Woakes and England correctly reviewed.

Captain Tim Paine (5) made a dreadful mistake as he pulled Broad (4-38) to Rory Burns at deep square leg, with James Pattinson following him for a duck two balls later, dismissed lbw before replays showed he should have survived

There was no debate when Pat Cummins (5) fell to Ben Stokes (1-44) via the same mode of dismissal as England ploughed into the Australia tail, although Peter Siddle (7 not out) provided more pain for the umpires as he rightly reviewed after edging on to his pads.

Smith reached his fifty in 119 balls at the end of the same over, he and Siddle surviving until tea with rain in the air in Birmingham.

 

Stuart Broad claimed two wickets before Australia recovered from a shaky start to reach 83-3 on the first morning of the Ashes.

Touring captain Tim Paine won the toss and opted to bat in the opening Test at Edgbaston, but his side were soon in trouble as the vastly experienced new-ball pairing of Broad and James Anderson started superbly, extracting seam movement to regularly beat the bat.

Broad, bowling notably fuller and posing a continued threat, removed openers David Warner and Cameron Bancroft for two and eight respectively in a superb first spell.

Australia also lost Usman Khawaja to Chris Woakes prior to lunch, but Steve Smith (23 not out) held firm in his first Test innings since he was suspended for his role in last year's ball-tampering scandal and Travis Head provided some much-needed impetus in reaching 26 not out.

Anderson - a fitness doubt ahead of this match - did not bowl again in the morning after an opening four-over burst that yielded figures of 0-1. He briefly left the field after that spell, although it was not clear whether his lack of overs prior to lunch was due to an injury scare or cautious management of the 37-year-old's workload.

Warner's brief innings was certainly not short of incident. Firstly, he was given a life on one when an edge down the leg side off Broad went unnoticed and England failed to call for a review.

In Broad's next over, England wasted a review after umpire Aleem Dar correctly turned down an lbw appeal. Broad did trap Warner in front four balls later, but replays showed the full-pitched delivery would have missed leg stump, meaning the batsman should have sent the decision upstairs.

Warner's dismissal was predictably greeted with jubilation by sandpaper-waving fans eager to remind the opener of his Cape Town ball-tampering shame.

Bancroft, representing Australia for the first time since that saga, soon became a second victim for Broad, edging to Joe Root at first slip having been squared up by one that left him.

A successful review from England then accounted for Khawaja, who got the faintest of edges to a Woakes delivery.

However, Smith would not be shifted and Head, after beginning his innings with 15 dot balls, scored freely to lift the pressure on Australia, who opted to leave out Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazlewood on a day when showers were forecast in the afternoon.

England seamers Chris Woakes and Stuart Broad tore through Ireland at Lord's on Friday to end a remarkable Test match where seam bowlers dominated.

Needing 182 for a historic maiden victory in cricket's longest format, Ireland were blown away as they subsided to 38 all out.

It meant England escaped with a remarkable win despite also failing to reach three figures in their first innings and needing nightwatchman Jack Leach to produce their most substantial batting contribution.

Whether it made for useful Ashes preparation is up for debate, but a Test played out in fast forward unquestionably made for compelling viewing.

 

A win without foundation

Before lunch was served on the first day, England's hopes of victory were in tatters. Playing on his home ground, Middlesex veteran Tim Murtagh earned himself a place on the fabled honours board with an imperious 5-13.

England's collapse to 85 all out was their lowest at home since Glenn McGrath's stunning 8-38 dismissed them for 77 at Lord's in 1997.

They escaped with a draw on that occasion and this win marks only the 13th time in Test history – and fifth since 1935 – that a team has managed to claim victory despite being dismissed for below 100 in their first innings.

Jack of all trades

Selected for his dependable left-arm spin, Jack Leach walked away with the man-of-the-match award after a diligently compiled 92 in the second innings gave some of his much-vaunted England colleagues a lesson in application at the crease.

Indeed, Leach's total was more than the 87 skipper Joe Root, Rory Burns, Joe Denly, Moeen Ali and the pair-bagging Jonny Bairstow could manage between them in the match. It was also only the second fifty in 2019 for an England Test opener.

England's out-of-sorts batsmen might be encouraged by Leach demonstrating how form can turn around at an unexpected moment. The highest score of his first-class career came after 19 innings without reaching double digits.

Wondrous Woakes loving Lord's 

Some observers believe two Tests every year at Lord's gives English cricket's HQ an unfair slice of the pie but, if Chris Woakes had his way, England would probably never play anywhere else.

The Warwickshire all-rounder put a lacklustre first-innings outing behind him to demolish Ireland with a masterful display of seam and swing. Woakes' eventual figures of 6-17 mean he has 24 Lord's wickets at an average of 9.75 – the third best of any seamer at a single venue.

For context, the 30-year-old's overall Test analysis is 78 wickets at 31.06. All three of his five-wicket hauls - along with one tally of 10 in a match - have come at Lord's, where he scored his maiden and so-far only Test century against India last August.

Irish dreams shattered

When captain Will Porterfield and James McCollum emerged to start the Ireland chase, victory and history appeared within reach.

But 15.4 brutal overs later it was all over. McCollum was the only visiting batsman to reach double figures second time around as Ireland posted the seventh-worst score in Test history and the lowest ever at Lord's.

Chris Woakes and Stuart Broad ripped through Ireland at Lord's to spare England from a humiliating Test defeat on the eve of the Ashes.

Woakes continued his superb record on the ground with 6-17 as the visitors were bundled out for a paltry 38 – the seventh-lowest completed innings score in Test history – and England won by 143 runs, despite collapsing to 85 all out themselves on the first morning.

The Warwickshire all-rounder now has three five-wicket hauls at Lord's, with 24 scalps overall at 9.75 at English cricket's HQ and his Friday spell served as a timely re-stating of his Ashes credentials, following a lacklustre first-innings outing.

Broad chipped in with 4-19 before Woakes uprooted Tim Murtagh's leg stump to wrap up a torturous 15.4 overs for Ireland on a day that had promised so much for the Test rookies.

Murtagh's mastery of helpful bowling conditions on day one put a first victory in the longest format at the third time of asking on the cards for Will Porterfield's side, and that remained the case when Stuart Thompson (3-44) bowled Olly Stone with the first ball of day three.

It meant England were 303 all out and the ultimately unchallenged victory target was 182.

The opening stand of 11 between Porterfield and James McCollum was Ireland's biggest, with a sharp catch behind from Jonny Bairstow off Woakes dismissing the captain to start the procession.

Porterfield's opposite number Joe Root claimed four slip catches, helping Broad see off first-innings half-centurion Andy Balbirnie and Woakes to dismiss McCollum – the only Irishman to reach double figures second time around.

McCollum's wicket was the first of three to go with the score on 24, as Broad pinned Kevin O'Brien plumb in front and Woakes successfully reviewed an lbw appeal against Gary Wilson.

By that time the dangerous Paul Stirling had departed bowled without scoring – his decision to aim a booming drive at Woakes a particularly foolhardy stroke in a match packed with them.

The tail offered scant resistance, with Woakes and Broad's brilliance bailing out their under-par batting colleagues and allowing England to head into their latest duel against Australia with blushes spared.

England's Ashes preparations quickly hit the rocks as they were incredibly all out for 85 against Ireland in a humiliating start to this week's Test.

Three Cricket World Cup heroes went for ducks, Jason Roy made just five on debut and captain Joe Root added only two as the stunned hosts failed to make it to lunch at Lord's.

Tim Murtagh took figures of 5-13, earning his place on the honours board, as Ireland made hay in their first Test at the home of cricket.

The remarkable scenes should offer serious encouragement to Australia, themselves and Australia A meanwhile struggling with the bat in Southampton.

England looked to have recovered from Roy's shaky start that saw him edge to Paul Stirling in the slips, but Joe Denly, top-scoring on 23, went lbw to Mark Adair (3-32) to spark an astonishing collapse.

Rory Burns was caught behind for six and Adair got Root lbw before a remarkable run of ducks for England's ODI stars.

Jonny Bairstow was superb in the World Cup but his stumps were destroyed by Murtagh, who trapped Chris Woakes lbw - the review going with the umpire's decision - two balls later in a stunning two-wicket maiden.

Moeen Ali was caught behind and suddenly England were forced to work hard to avoid their record-low Test score (45 against Australia in 1887), doing so with boundaries met with sarcastic cheers.

The home side's fortunes did not improve, though, as Boyd Rankin (2-5) got a nick from Stuart Broad, before Sam Curran sent the same man to James McCollum at short leg.

Olly Stone, another debutant, got to 19 before Adair skittled him and England's innings was cut embarrassingly short just before the end of the session.

"I'm not quite sure what's happened over the past two hours, to be honest," Murtagh told Sky Sports.

Liam Plunkett and Chris Woakes took three wickets apiece as England were set 242 to beat New Zealand in the Cricket World Cup final at Lord's on Sunday.

Plunkett took 3-42 and Woakes 3-37, restricting the Black Caps to 241-8 after Kane Willamson won the toss and opted to bat under grey skies following a slightly delayed start due to morning rain.

Henry Nicholls top scored with 55 and Tom Latham made 47 as England fielded superbly and bowled tightly, roared on by an expectant crowd as both sides bid to win the tournament for the first time.

Nicholls successfully reviewed after he was given out leg before to Woakes without scoring, but the same bowler saw the back of Martin Guptill in the seventh over.

Guptill, who cut Jofra Archer for six and drove the paceman for four in the same over, inexplicably reviewed when he was struck bang in front and was on his way for 19.

Left-hander Nicholls and a watchful Williamson ran positively in a stand of 74 to steady the ship before Plunkett got the big scalp of the New Zealand captain, a review showing he feathered behind to Jos Buttler for 30.

Nicholls brought up his 50 from 71 balls but was on his way in the next over, playing on to a probing delivery from the excellent Plunkett as England put the squeeze on.

New Zealand were 141-4 when Ross Taylor was unfortunate be adjudged lbw by Marais Erasmus from a Mark Wood ball that was going over the top, with no review to save him.

Jimmy Neesham struck three boundaries before tamely chipping Plunkett to Joe Root at mid-off, reducing the underdogs to 173-5 with 11 overs remaining. 

Latham launched Wood into the leg side for six before he and Colin de Grandhomme were caught by substitute fielder James Vince off Woakes.

Archer bowled Matt Henry in the last over as New Zealand's attempted late onslaught failed to materialise.

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