Eliud Kipchoge has been shortlisted for the Male World Athlete of the Year two days after making history in Vienna.

The legendary Kenyan long-distance runner became the first person to run a marathon in less than two hours in the Austrian capital on Saturday.

Marathon world-record holder and Olympic champion Kipchoge, 34, is among 11 nominees to be named the best male athlete of 2019 - an award he won last year.

New world 100 metres world champion Christian Coleman of the United States was also announced as a nominee on Monday along with compatriot and 200m world champion Noah Lyles.

Steven Gardiner, unbeaten this year in the 400m, 1500m champion Timothy Cheruiyot, 400m hurdles star Karsten Warholm, 800m world champion Donavan Brazier and Joshua Cheptegei - winner of the 10000m in Doha this month - are also contenders.

Triple jump king Christian Taylor, discus world champion Daniel Stahl and pole vault world champion Sam Kendricks have also been recognised for outstanding performances this year.

Christian Coleman revelled in being crowned the world 100 metres champion after sealing gold in Saturday's final in Doha.

The 23-year-old lit up the World Athletics Championships by recording the sixth fastest time in history, clocking an impressive 9.76seconds.

That effort saw him topple fellow American Justin Gatlin, who stood on top of the podium ahead of Coleman two years ago in London.

"World champion, it sounds incredible, too good to be true," said Coleman, who saw a case against him for reportedly missing three doping tests dropped by the United States Anti-Doping Agency earlier this month.

"For me to make it here and come out with a gold is incredible. I was just out of college two years ago and not many people expected me to win a silver. I expected to come out here and be great and upgrade my silver medal."

With the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo drawing ever closer, Coleman admitted he had allowed his mind to wander to thoughts of competing in Japan next year.

"It's hard to compartmentalise and not think about Tokyo – that's huge to go to an Olympics," he said.

"I will be expected to go there and medal but the work doesn't stop. Hopefully I can make the team."

At the age of 37, there are questions over whether this was Gatlin's last appearance on the global stage.

But, having run a time of 9.89secs to claim silver, the divisive sprint veteran was proud of his effort and revealed his plans to join Coleman in Tokyo.

"This season was a testament to my endurance and will," he said. "I had setbacks this season. I just wanted to stay focused on this race and give it all I got for this season.

"Christian has ran a spectacular season, great times. I couldn't say it was a shock that he would do a great job here. I had to hold on and stay strong in my technique."

Asked if he will be at the Olympics next year, he replied: "I'm coming. I'm going to be better. I'm ready."

Christian Coleman took World Athletics Championships gold in the men's 100 metres final with the sixth quickest time in history.

The American clocked 9.76seconds to get revenge on compatriot Justin Gatlin after finishing second to his rival in London two years ago.

Gatlin ran 9.89seconds, while Andre De Grasse was third in 9.90secs, but once again the action was played out against the backdrop of a largely empty stadium in Doha.

There were three other finals before the blue-riband event, with winners crowned in the women's hammer throw and 10,000m, and the men's long jump.

COOL COLEMAN IS DOHA'S SPRINT KING

Coleman went into Saturday's final as the clear favourite to win and never looked in danger of suffering an upset loss.

Quick out of the blocks and leading from the off, the 23-year-old set a world-leading time to secure the biggest win of his career.

His closest competition came from the divisive Gatlin who, at the age of 37, took silver as he surrendered his world title.

The top five – completed by Akani Simbine and Yohan Blake – all ran under 10 seconds.

 

GAYLE SEALS LONG JUMP TRIUMPH

Tajay Gayle's leap of 8.69m won him gold in the men's long jump, a full 30cm ahead of Jeff Henderson.

The Jamaican, who only narrowly qualified for the final, set a world-leading distance with his fourth attempt, which proved to be his last.

Olympic champion Henderson could only register 8.17m with his final effort, leaving him to settle for silver with a best jump of 8.39m.

Cuba's Juan Miguel Echevarria was third after posting a distance of 8.34m.

Dutchwoman Sifan Hassan prevailed in the 10,000m, with Ethiopia's Letesenbet Gidey and Kenya's Agnes Jebet Tirop rounding off the podium.

DeAnna Price sealed another gold for the USA in the women's hammer throw, with Joanna Fiodorow taking silver for Poland and Wang Zheng adding a bronze to China's medal tally.

USA CLAIM WORLD RECORD

The first world record of this championships went to America's mixed 4x400m relay team.

Tyrell Richard, Jessica Beard, Jasmine Blocker and Obi Igbokwe combined to run 3:12.42 on the event's maiden outing at this competition.

Jamaica came a close second, with Bahrain third.

 

Donovan Bailey, the 1995 World 100m champion, believes that there will be a huge void to fill at the 2019 IAAF World Championships in Doha as for the first time in a decade there will be no Usain Bolt.

Christian Coleman has hit out at "disrespectful fake fans" and vowed he will never fail a drugs test in his life after being cleared to compete in the World Athletics Championships in Doha.

Coleman was facing a potential two-year ban after the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) last month charged the sprinter for missing three random drugs tests in the space of a year.

USADA withdrew the charges after receiving guidance from the World Anti-Doping Agency over whether Coleman missed the tests.

The 23-year-old maintained his innocence throughout and on Wednesday defended himself as he prepares to go for 100 metres gold in Qatar.

He posted on Instagram: "I put my heart and soul into track and field and worked hard to get where I am today.

"It's simply disrespectful when fake fans speculate and talk about drugs in relation to the great athletes we have in this sport. It does nothing but hold the sport back from the popularity I know it can reach in the future.

"I shouldn't have to defend myself but for the first and last time I literally do not take ANY supplements or protein powders. Nothing even legal to help with recovery. Nothing. I work hard at practice, drink water and Powerade, rest, and work even harder the next day.

"Therefore I have never failed a drug test and never will. I'm the biggest advocate for clean sport because I know the sacrifice and what it takes to make it to this level.

"There have been a lot of inaccurate things said in the media over the past few weeks – it's a shame we live in a world where clicks=money, yet people still believe everything they read.

"Huge Thank you to all my supporters. Can't wait for World Champs. See y'all in Doha."

The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) announced on Monday that it is withdrawing its charges against American track and field star Christian Coleman.

Coleman, 23, was facing a possible two-year ban after being accused of violating World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) regulations, which would have kept him out of this month's World Athletics Championships in Doha.

The sprinter had allegedly contravened the "whereabouts rules" by missing three random drugs tests in a 12-month period because he failed to accurately report his location for testing purposes.

Under the "whereabouts" system, athletes must let officials know where they will be for one hour every day as well as details of overnight accommodation and training.

USADA said it withdrew the charge after receiving guidance from the World Anti-Doping Agency over whether Coleman actually missed three tests in a 12-month period, based on how the testing calendar is administered.

In a statement, it said: "USADA has determined that under the applicable rules, and in order to ensure that Coleman is treated consistently with other athletes under the World Anti-Doping Program, Coleman should not be considered to have three Whereabouts Failures in a 12-month period.

"Accordingly, USADA has withdrawn its charge that Coleman committed an anti-doping rule violation and has so notified WADA and the Athletics Integrity Unit of the International Association of Athletics Federations."

USADA CEO Travis T. Tygart added in a statement: "Consistent application of the global anti-doping rules is essential in every case."

Coleman was initially set to have a hearing Wednesday, but USADA has decided that is no longer necessary.

He has previously expressed confidence that he would be able to clear his name following the allegations.

"I'm not a guy who takes any supplements at all, so I'm never concerned about taking drug tests, at any time," Coleman said in a statement last month.

Free to compete internationally, Coleman is the favourite for gold in the 100 metres at the world championships in Qatar, after winning silver in London two years ago behind compatriot Justin Gatlin.

He ran a world-leading time of 9.81 seconds at the Diamond League meeting at Stanford in June and broke the indoor 60-metre world record last year.

Sprinter Christian Coleman is confident he will be cleared to go for gold at the IAAF World Athletics Championships next month after reportedly being charged with an anti-doping rule violation.

The United States 100 metres champion is alleged to have missed three drugs tests in the space of a year, which would constitute a breach of World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) regulations.

Coleman could face a two-year ban, which would rule him out of the World Championships in Doha in September and the Olympic Games in Tokyo next year, if found guilty by the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).

However, the 23-year-old, who faces a hearing on September 4, has vowed to clear his name.

"I'm not a guy who takes any supplements at all, so I'm never concerned about taking drug tests, at any time," he said in a statement released to former Trinidad and Tobago sprinter Ato Boldon.

"What has been widely reported concerning filing violations is simply not true. I am confident the upcoming hearing on September 4 will clear the matter and I will compete at the World Championships in Doha this fall.

"Sometime after the hearing, I will be free to answer questions about the matter, but for now I must reserve and respect the process."

Coleman is the favourite to be crowned 100m world champion in Qatar after winning silver in London two years ago behind compatriot Justin Gatlin.

He set a world-leading time of 9.81 seconds in the Diamond League meeting at Stanford in June and broke the indoor 60m world record last year.

With just a year to go until the Olympics gets under way in Tokyo, athletes from all over the world already have gold medals in their sights.

Many are well on course to mount a strong challenge for glory, while others may consider themselves a long way from where they need to be.

With 12 months to go until the opening ceremony, excitement is building and over 3.2 million tickets have been sold.

We take a form check on five of the stars who could prove the big draws in Japan.

 

SIMONE BILES

Superstar Biles will retire from gymnastics after attempting to add to her medal tally in Tokyo.

Fitness permitting, it would be a surprise if the 22-year-old does not increase her haul of four Olympic golds and one bronze medal.

The American declared she will quit as "I feel like my body is kind of falling apart".

Biles put on another masterclass to win the women’s all-around title at the GK U.S. Classic last Saturday and eyebrows will be raised if she does not achieve more podium-topping success in her swan-song Games.

ADAM PEATY

Exceptional British swimmer Peaty continues to hit new heights, shattering world records and winning gold medals galore.

It was mission accomplished in the 24-year-old's quest to achieve 'Project 56' at the World Championships in Gwangju this month when he became the first person to dip under the 57-second barrier for the 100 metres breaststroke.

That record swim of 56.88secs ticked off one of Peaty's biggest goals and he has by no means finished yet.

The Englishman has raised his total of World Championships titles to six and the Olympic 100m breaststroke champion will be expected to be on the top step of the podium at least once in Tokyo.

 

CASTER SEMENYA

The Olympics might not be at the forefront of all-conquering South African athlete Semenya's mind at the moment.

Semenya has endured a complicated, drawn-out saga in a case involving world governing body the IAAF which has raised worries for her career.

The double Olympic 800 metres champion is awaiting a Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland verdict over whether she can continue to run against women over two laps of the track.

Semenya has long been challenging the IAAF's decision to impose restrictions on testosterone levels in women competing at distances ranging from 400m to one mile. The Swiss court has suspended that restriction for now.

Semenya's testosterone count is high but naturally occurring. It could see her sidelined if she refuses to take medication to reduce her level, unless the courts come down on her side.

The 28-year-old has not let the ongoing case affect her performances, setting the fastest 800m time by a woman on American soil of one minute and 55.70 seconds at the Diamond League meeting in Stanford last month.

 

CHRISTIAN COLEMAN

What is certain at the Games next year is that the men's 100m athletics gold is up for grabs, in the absence of Usain Bolt.

Bolt retired after the World Championships in London two years ago with eight Olympic gold medals to his name.

It is not the Jamaican legend's old rival Justin Gatlin - Olympic champion in 2004 - who is rated as the favourite to take Bolt's crown next year.

World champion Gatlin's fellow American Christian Coleman appears to be the man to beat, leading the way in the Diamond League and establishing himself as the top-ranked male sprinter on the planet.

 

RORY MCILROY

McIlroy was criticised for stating he would not watch the return of golf to the Olympic calendar three years ago in Rio, after opting out of the competition.

The four-time major champion cited the Zika virus as his reason for not teeing off in Brazil, where Justin Rose won the first Olympic golf event for 112 years.

However, Northern Irishman McIlroy stated he could not pass up the opportunity to be an Olympian next time around.

The former world number one will be hoping it is a case of 'what a difference a year makes' in terms of his summer form, having failed to make the cut at The Open in his homeland at Royal Portrush last week.

Jamaica’s Tyquendo Tracey, despite running a season’s best 10.18, was no match for the 100-metre field at the Shanghai Diamond League on Saturday. 

Caterine Ibarguen made Diamond League history in Brussels on Friday as she became the first athlete to win the long jump and triple jump titles. 

Christian Coleman hung on to win the men's 100 meters on his return from injury at the Birmingham Diamond League on Saturday. 

American sprint sensation Noah Lyles is being seen as the new face of track and field following the retirement of Usain Bolt, the man who has carried the sport for the last decade.

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