Top-rated cricketers taking part in this season’s Caribbean Premier League (CPL) are expected to suffer a 30 percent pay cut as a scaled-down version of the tournament is expected to be confirmed for Trinidad and Tobago in a week’s time.

According to the latest information players earning between US$21,000 and US$112,000 will receive a salary 30 percent lower, when compared to last season.  Players in the US$20,000 bracket will receive a 10 percent pay cut with no salary cut for players below that bracket.

The entire tournament is expected to take place in Trinidad and Tobago, with players staying in the tournament hotel under conditions overseen by a medical advisory committee and matches played in empty stadiums.

CPL Operations manager Michael Hall claimed the devastation caused by the spread of the coronavirus had made the idea to stage the tournament a trick decision.  But felt it was important to send a message that the region is ready to do business again.

 "Should the tournament take place it will take place entirely in Trinidad & Tobago, which is the most successful country in the Caribbean in controlling the spread of the virus - recording just one new case since April 30 and just 117 total cases overall," Hall, the CPL wrote in an update sent to various stakeholders, quoted by ESPNcricinfo.

"One of the consequences the Covid-19 pandemic will have is that the CPL will be played behind closed doors in 2020. We were therefore faced with the very difficult decision of whether to play the tournament at all,” he added.

"[But] we also felt strongly that it is important for cricket to be seen to be getting underway again as well as to show the world that the Caribbean is open for business.”

Hall added that the executive expected to get approval from the Trinidad and Tobago government next week.  The tournament will be held from August 1 to September 12, with the first matches on August 18 and the final on September 10.

Out of favour West Indies batsman Jason Mohammed is hoping to recover from a disappointing outing in 2019 Caribbean Premier League (CPL), when the upcoming edition rolls around.

Following the disruptions caused by the threat of the coronavirus the exact date and details of the tournament are yet to be finalised, but Mohammed admits he is eager to get back on the pitch. And, he might as well if he is looking to make up for the disappointment of the previous campaign.

Representing the St Kitts and Nevis Patriots, Mohammad had his poorest showing to date. Playing in five games the player got a total of 20 and averaged four. Far from his heyday in 2016 when he scored 287 runs to lead the Guyana Amazon Warriors with an average of 47.

For the upcoming edition, the player hopes to play more to what he believes is his strength in the middle of the innings. “I think I feel most comfortable batting at number four and controlling the middle overs. I feel like that is my strength in T20 cricket,” Mohammed said in a recent interview with T&T’s 7PmNews. “I like to be able to rotate the strike and build partnerships and from there to the end finish off the innings strong.”

President of Cricket West Indies (CWI) Ricky Skerritt has strongly hinted that he expects to see action taken against veteran batsman Chris Gayle, following a recent public outburst, which mainly disparaged former teammate and Jamaica Tallawahs assistant coach Ramnaresh Sarwan.

In the now-infamous YouTube post, Gayle accused Tallawahs franchise chief executive Jeff Miller and owner Krish Persaud of "playing a game".  His fiercest criticism was, however, reserved for Sarwan who he accused of having a role in his unexpected dismissal from the franchise.  In the video, Gayle referred to Sarwan as a ‘snake’ and described the former batsman as ‘worse than the coronavirus’.  Sarwan has denied any involvement in the non-renewal of Gayle’s Tallawah’s contract and insisted the assertions made against him were false.

Skerritt, who called the incident unfortunate, said CWI was keeping a close eye on the situation, but insisted that for now the prerogative of taking action would be in the hands of the CPL to which Gayle is contracted.

"It cannot be good for West Indies cricket obviously. It is certainly not something that I enjoyed reading about," Skerritt told Trinidad radio station i955fm in a recent interview.

“If however, a player is contracted to a club or a franchise or to Cricket West Indies, then (due to) the contract they have signed, that kind of behaviour brings that contract to some level of disrepute. So, I would expect that this most recent matter is not over,” he added,

" I think Chris is going to face…I'm sure there's some kind of discussion taking place at the moment between Chris and the CPL because Chris is signed into a franchise team."

The CWI boss, however, went on to make it clear that the CPL still fell within the remit of the regional cricket governors and as such, they would be keeping an eye on the matter.

"If he was on contract with Cricket West Indies, and to a certain extent it is by being in the CPL, so we kind of have a watching interest. But we'll wait and see what happens,” Skerritt said.

While insisting he expected the due process to run its course, Skerritt said he hoped the outburst would not lead to the cricketer’s career coming to a premature end.

"I hope it doesn't become a world matter in terms of the career of Mr. Gayle because it's been a very outstanding career and I really wouldn't want to see it being brought to an end by this event."

Gayle has since joined the St Lucia Zouks.

 

 

Caribbean Premier League (CPL) Chief Operation’s Officer Pete Russell has revealed the league’s hopes of being a major signal the region is once again open for business in the aftermath of the coronavirus.

For now, the CPL has decided to take a wait and see type of approach as it relates to keeping its original scheduled launch date in September of this.  Although the virus has largely, comparatively had less of an impact on the Caribbean to date, Russell insisted the CPL were keeping a close eye on things.

There are contingencies in place that could see the tournament played behind closed doors and without overseas players, at one stadium in Barbados.  With a few months still left to go before the scheduled start of the event, Russell is hoping things will get better.

"It's good that the Caribbean has locked down early, and it hasn't been hit in the same way as the UK, for example," Russell told Espncricinfo. "We're looking at different permutations in terms of what could or couldn't happen, but the lucky thing is that we've got a bit of time - we don't have to force a decision,” he added.

"I don't think there's any question that we'll be able to play it. We're only going to play if it's safe to do so, but we've been approached by a lot of the countries who want it to happen. The reason [for that] is that it's a big sporting event, and it could act as a sign or a marker that the Caribbean is open for business again." 

The St Lucia Zouks have been sold to K.P.H Dream Private Cricket, a group of investors with extensive experience in high-profile cricket, the Caribbean Premier League has announced.

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