Santos set up an all-Brazilian Copa Libertadores final with an impressive 3-0 win over Boca Juniors on Wednesday.

Goals from Diego Pituca, Yeferson Soteldo and Lucas Braga saw Santos to a comfortable home victory against Boca, sealing a semi-final success after the first leg finished goalless.

Frank Fabra was sent off in the second half for the visitors, Santos moving into the Copa Libertadores final for the first time since 2011.

They will meet Palmeiras at the Maracana on January 30 in the first all-Brazilian decider since 2006.

After flares were parachuted onto the pitch ahead of kick-off, Marinho hit the post for Santos inside the opening minute.

But amid penalty shouts for a handball, Pituca scrambled in the first goal of the tie for Santos in the 16th minute.

Soteldo doubled the lead early in the second half, stepping inside from the left before powering a finish into the top corner at Esteban Andrada's near post.

Santos sealed their win in the 51st minute, Braga tapping in after brilliant work down the right from Marinho.

Boca's chances of a comeback were ended when Fabra saw red five minutes later after stomping on Marinho's stomach.

Liverpool are reportedly interested in Sergio Ramos, while Real Madrid have a successor for Zinedine Zidane lined up.

Premier League champions Liverpool are linked with centre-backs due to long-term injuries to Virgil van Dijk and Joe Gomez.

And Ramos is apparently a target.

 

TOP STORY – LIVERPOOL INTERESTED IN RAMOS

Liverpool are interested in Real Madrid defender Ramos, according to El Chiringuito.

The 34-year-old's future at Madrid is uncertain with his contract expiring at the end of the season.

Also at Liverpool, Fabrizio Romano reports they are yet to open talks to sign Lille defender Sven Botman.

 

ROUND-UP

- Zidane was under pressure at Real Madrid earlier in the season, and the LaLiga giants have his replacement in mind. AS reports Raul – who is in charge of Real Madrid Castilla – is seen as the natural heir to the Frenchman.

Christian Eriksen is expected to leave Inter, but just where to remains to be seen. CalcioMercato reports the Serie A giants are yet to receive an offer for the midfielder, who has been linked to Paris Saint-Germain and Arsenal.

- With Diego Costa having departed, Atletico Madrid are said to be looking for another forward. The Daily Mail reports Napoli striker Arkadiusz Milik is at the top of their list, while Espanyol's Raul de Tomas and Real Betis' Loren Moron are of interest.

Manchester City are linked to Barcelona star Lionel Messi, but they may have a younger version to target. talkSPORT reports the Premier League club are plotting a move for 17-year-old Estudiantes winger Dario Sarmiento, who has been dubbed "mini Messi".

- Sergio Romero looks set to leave Manchester United. The Manchester Evening News reports the goalkeeper has bid farewell to his team-mates ahead of an expected move to Boca Juniors.

Boca Juniors were held to a 0-0 draw by Santos in the first leg of their Copa Libertadores semi-final on Wednesday.

Neither team was able to find a breakthrough in a cagey clash at La Bombonera.

The goalless draw, in which there were just four shots on target, leaves the tie wide open ahead of the return leg in Santos on January 13.

Sebastian Villa hit the crossbar for six-time champions Boca in the eighth minute, although the forward was offside.

Both teams pushed for a goal but struggled to create much of note.

Santos, who last reached the Libertadores final in 2011, had a late penalty shout turned down after Marinho appeared to be brought down by Carlos Izquierdoz.

Boca Juniors made a moving tribute to the daughter of club legend Diego Maradona during their 2-0 win over another of his former sides Newell's Old Boys on Sunday.

Argentina great Maradona, regarded by many as the best footballer ever, died at the age of 60 last Wednesday.

Such was his influence on the sport, homage has been paid across the world – from compatriot Lionel Messi revealing a Newell's shirt during a goal celebration earlier in the day, to Napoli confirming plans to rename their stadium Stadio Diego Armando Maradona and revealing an Argentina-inspired fourth kit in their weekend win over Roma.

Boca, where Maradona spent two spells, had their Copa Libertadores clash with Internacional postponed just a few hours after the 1986 World Cup winner died, meaning the visit of Newell's to a mostly empty La Bombonera was their first game since his passing.

Colombia international Edwin Cardona opened the scoring with a free-kick, before the team ran over to the sidelines and produced a Maradona jersey, laid it on the floor and applauded in front of the private box where his visibly emotional daughter Dalma was watching on.

Boca coach Miguel Angel Russo, a former Argentina team-mate of Maradona, said after the game: "I knew it was going to be an uphill struggle. The phrase I used was that, to pay homage to the best in the world, you have to play well and that Boca needed to win.

"It was the best way to pay homage to him, to play this beautiful sport well that he played to an incomparably high level.

"We got through it in the best way. I am happy for the victory. The day has been covered by a blanket because of what Diego Maradona was as a player and person."

Every Boca player wore Maradona's name on the back of their jersey throughout the match and defender Carlos Izquierdoz could not help but feel humbled.

Nevertheless, he believed the team acted responsibly with respect to donning the name of one his country's most famous players.

"The truth is that wearing a name like that on my shirt gave me a little embarrassment, so to speak," he told FOX Sports.

"We tried to do it responsibly. I'm happy for tributes that have been paid to him everywhere. We were able to win, to show that we wanted to play – the best tribute was to give his family a win.

"They were special moments. The truth is that all this generates emotion, remembering such an emblematic player who represented so much for Argentine footballer, the country.

"He always put the flag on his shoulders. He deserved recognition."

Napoli will on Sunday unveil a new fourth kit that pays tribute to Diego Maradona, four days on from the club legend's death.

Maradona, one of football's all-time greats, died of natural causes at the age of 60 on Wednesday.

Although coach of Argentinian side Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata at the time of his death, Maradona was more renowned for his remarkable playing career, during which he inspired his country to 1986 World Cup success and also played for Argentinos Juniors, Boca Juniors, Barcelona, Napoli and Sevilla.

But it was his time in Naples that is remembered as his prime, as he helped them to two Serie A titles, a Coppa Italia and a UEFA Cup crown.

Napoli's current team all took to the pitch in jerseys emblazoned with Maradona's name and iconic number 10 on the back before Thursday's 2-0 Europa League win over Rijeka at Stadio San Paolo, which is set to be renamed Stadio Diego Armando Maradona.

The club's tributes to their greatest ever player do not stop there, as they confirmed on Sunday that a new strip inspired by Maradona and Argentina – which was conceived last year – is set to be revealed and worn against Roma later in the day.

A statement read: "A year ago, together with Kappa, we thought of designing a special jersey that echoes Diego Maradona, his beloved Argentina and the close-knit bond with the people of Naples.

"Our hope was that Diego would be able to see it, perhaps even wear it and share in our excitement about it.

"It was agreed that the new kit would be unveiled on matchday nine of the Serie A campaign, during the match between SSC Napoli and Roma.

"The jersey that the players will don tonight will have an even greater significance than initially intended."

Napoli have not provided any further detail regarding the kit's aesthetics, however graphics accompanying their statement showed prominent blue-and-white stripes, as famously worn by Argentina.

Diego Maradona was buried in a private funeral after thousands gathered on the streets of Buenos Aires to mourn the Argentina and Napoli great.

Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata head coach Maradona – arguably football's greatest ever player – died of natural causes at the age of 60 on Wednesday.

Mourners and police clashed at the wake of Maradona as large crowds took to the streets of the Argentina capital to bid farewell to the football legend on Thursday.

Maradona's coffin was draped in the Argentina flag at Casa Rosada – the presidential mansion where his body laid in honour amid three days of national mourning – before being transported to a cemetery.

Away from the chaotic scenes, a private ceremony was held for Maradona's burial at the Jardines de Bella Vista cemetery on the outskirts of the city, which is reportedly where his parents were laid to rest.

Maradona was discharged from hospital a fortnight ago following brain surgery, having undergone a routine operation for a subdural haematoma after being admitted to hospital due to concerns over anaemia and dehydration.

The captain and inspiration behind Argentina's World Cup success in 1986 before going on to coach his country at the 2010 showpiece, Maradona had been hospitalised just days after turning 60.

He appeared in a fragile state when he briefly made an appearance as his Gimnasia side played a match on the evening of his birthday last month.

Maradona won 91 caps for Argentina between 1977 and 1994, scoring 34 goals at international level.

He started his career with Argentinos Juniors before joining Boca Juniors and went on to play for Barcelona, Napoli, Sevilla and Newell's Old Boys before returning to Boca in 1995.

Maradona had the best years of his club career in Italy, playing a massive part in Napoli winning the Serie A title in the 1986-87 and 1989-90 seasons.

Playmaker Maradona also lifted the UEFA Cup with Napoli in 1989 and he won three trophies during his time at Barca – including the Copa del Rey in 1983.

Maradona also had stints in charge of Textil Mandiyu, Racing Club, Al-Wasl, Fujairah and Dorados de Sinaloa in Mexico before being appointed by Gimnasia last year.

Diego Maradona's lawyer Matias Morla criticised the emergency services and their delay in attending to the Argentina and Napoli great following his death.

Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata head coach Maradona – arguably football's greatest ever player – died of natural causes at the age of 60 on Wednesday.

Maradona was discharged from hospital a fortnight ago following brain surgery, having undergone a routine operation for a subdural haematoma after being admitted to hospital due to concerns over anaemia and dehydration.

Thousands gathered to farewell the football legend in Buenos Aires on Thursday during three days of national mourning in his homeland, where Maradona's coffin was draped in the Argentina flag at Casa Rosada – the presidential mansion – before being transported to a cemetery.

In the aftermath of Maradona's passing, Morla denounced the emergency services as he called for an investigation.

"Today is a day of profound pain, sadness and reflection. I feel in my heart the departure of a friend whom I honoured with my loyalty and companionship to the end of his days," Morla said in a statement published via his social media channels.

"I bid him farewell in person and the wake should be an intimate moment for the family.

"In terms of the report from the Prosecutor San Isidro, it is inexplicable that for 12 hours my friend has had no attention or check-up from the personnel dedicated to these ends. The ambulance took more than half an hour to arrive, which was a criminal idiocy.

"This should not be overlooked and I will ask for it to be investigated until the end of its consequences. As Diego told me, 'you are my soldier, act without pity'.

"To define Diego in this moment of deep desolation and pain I can only say: He was a good son, he was the best football player in history, and he was an honest person. May you rest in peace, brother."

Maradona – the captain and inspiration behind Argentina's World Cup success in 1986 before going on to coach his country at the 2010 showpiece – had been hospitalised just days after turning 60.

He appeared in a fragile state when he briefly made an appearance as his Gimnasia side played a match on the evening of his birthday last month.

Maradona won 91 caps for Argentina between 1977 and 1994, scoring 34 goals at international level.

He started his career with Argentinos Juniors before joining Boca Juniors and went on to play for Barcelona, Napoli, Sevilla and Newell's Old Boys before returning to Boca in 1995.

Maradona had the best years of his club career in Italy, playing a massive part in Napoli winning the Serie A title in the 1986-87 and 1989-90 seasons.

Playmaker Maradona also lifted the UEFA Cup with Napoli in 1989 and he won three trophies during his time at Barca – including the Copa del Rey in 1983.

Maradona also had stints in charge of Textil Mandiyu, Racing Club, Al-Wasl, Fujairah and Dorados de Sinaloa in Mexico before being appointed by Gimnasia last year.

Jose Mourinho said Diego Maradona would always call him after big defeats as a manager, the Tottenham boss remembering the Argentina and Napoli great after his death.

Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata head coach Maradona – arguably football's greatest ever player – died of natural causes at the age of 60 on Wednesday.

Thousands gathered to farewell the football legend in Buenos Aires on Thursday during three days of national mourning in his homeland, where Maradona's coffin was draped in the Argentina flag at Casa Rosada – the presidential mansion.

Former Real Madrid, Inter, Chelsea and Manchester United manager Mourinho paid tribute to World Cup winner and friend Maradona following Tottenham's 4-0 rout of Ludogorets in the Europa League on Thursday.

"Maradona and Diego, Maradona the world knows and the world never forgets," Mourinho told reporters during his post-match news conference.

"I made sure that my son knows a lot about him, even being born after Diego Maradona as a player and I know my son will make sure that one day when he is a father he will not let his kids forget. It was similar with my Dad and Di Stefano.

"I never saw Di Stefano play football, my Dad made sure I knew about Di Stefano because with this generation, we have players from my generation and Diego in my generation was what everybody knows.

"Then there is Diego the guy and that one I miss. I feel sorry that I didn't spend more time with him, I would love. His family, his big friends and colleagues are very privileged to spend and know Diego well.

"I know him well enough and in my big defeats, he would always call me. In my victories, never but I will miss Diego. Of course I am very sad but I have a smile because with every minute I spent with him, it was to laugh."

Maradona was discharged from hospital a fortnight ago following brain surgery, having undergone a routine operation for a subdural haematoma after being admitted to hospital due to concerns over anaemia and dehydration.

The captain and inspiration behind Argentina's World Cup success in 1986 before going on to coach his country at the 2010 showpiece, Maradona had been hospitalised just days after turning 60.

He appeared in a fragile state when he briefly made an appearance as his Gimnasia side played a match on the evening of his birthday last month.

Maradona won 91 caps for Argentina between 1977 and 1994, scoring 34 goals at international level.

He started his career with Argentinos Juniors before joining Boca Juniors and went on to play for Barcelona, Napoli, Sevilla and Newell's Old Boys before returning to Boca in 1995.

Maradona had the best years of his club career in Italy, playing a massive part in Napoli winning the Serie A title in the 1986-87 and 1989-90 seasons.

Playmaker Maradona also lifted the UEFA Cup with Napoli in 1989 and he won three trophies during his time at Barca – including the Copa del Rey in 1983.

Maradona also had stints in charge of Textil Mandiyu, Racing Club, Al-Wasl, Fujairah and Dorados de Sinaloa in Mexico before being appointed by Gimnasia last year.

Diego Maradona's death made headlines across the globe as the world marked the passing of the Argentinian football legend.

The 60-year-old died in Buenos Aires on Wednesday, two weeks after being discharged from hospital having undergone a routine operation for a subdural haematoma.

After that news was announced by the Argentine Football Association, tributes flooded in for the Napoli great and on Thursday news of his death made front and back pages all over the planet.

Here is a collection of headlines on the day after Maradona's death.

 

In his home country, the newspaper Cronica superimposed Maradona atop the World Cup trophy, back turned and walking away, under the headline "Adios" (goodbye).

Clarin ran a picture of Maradona holding the World Cup aloft, with the words "Conmocion mundial: murio Diego Maradona" (World upheaval: Diego Maradona dies).

Uruguayan outlet El Observador went with "A que planeta te fuiste" (Which planet did you go to?), in reference to his otherworldly talent.

El Pais, a Spanish newspaper, said the former Barcelona forward was "Un dios del football" (A God of football).

Also in Spain, Marca's front page featured the words "If I die, I want to be reborn and I want to be a footballer... and I want to be Diego Armando Maradona again".

In France, L'Equipe ran a full front-page image of Maradona in his prime wearing the blue and white of his country, with a headline which declared "Dieu est mort" (God is dead).

Germany's Kicker dedicated its front page to the news, putting the dates of Maradona's birth and death under a picture of the star playing for Argentina.

La Gazzetta Dello Sport showed Maradona kissing the World Cup trophy and went with the words "Ho visto Maradona" (I've seen Maradona).

It was against England that Maradona scored his famous 'Hand of God' goal as he led Argentina to World Cup glory at Mexico 86. English newspaper The Sun was among the outlets to play on that phrase, coined by the man himself.

"In the hands of God," read that publication's front page, which featured an image of the incident as the diminutive forward beat England goalkeeper Peter Shilton to the ball. The paper described Maradona as "England's World Cup nemesis and one of the all-time greats".

The Mirror ran a similar headline, adding: "Diego Maradona, a hero, a villain, a cheat and a genius... dead at 60".

Placing a little more emphasis on his achievements, The Times opted for a picture of Maradona celebrating that 1986 success in Mexico City, accompanied by the headline "Millions mourn Maradona's death".

And the Daily Express, using both the handball and trophy photographs, described Maradona as "the eternal, flawed genius".

Napoli president Aurelio De Laurentiis revealed the club's stadium could be renamed to honour Partenopei great Diego Maradona after his death on Wednesday.

Maradona – arguably football's greatest ever player – died at the age of 60 after a suspected heart attack, the Argentine Football Association (AFA) confirmed midweek.

A World Cup winner with Argentina, Maradona enjoyed great success in Naples, where he guided Napoli to unprecedented Serie A glory in 1986-87 and 1989-90 – the Italian team are yet to add to their only two Scudetto honours.

As Napoli fans and Naples natives mourn the death of Maradona – a God-like figure in the city – De Laurentiis said the Stadio San Paolo could be named after the football icon.

"It could be an idea to name the stadium San Paolo-Maradona, it's something we can think about," De Laurentiis told RMC Sport.

Naples mayor Luigi de Magistris also tweeted: "Let's name the San Paolo stadium after Diego Armando Maradona!!!"

Gennaro Gattuso's Napoli host Rijeka in their Europa League Group F clash at the Stadio San Paolo on Thursday.

Napoli are second heading into the matchday four fixture, adrift of AZ Alkmaar on goal difference.

"I'd like to project Maradona's face [onto the stadium] during the whole game tomorrow," De Laurentiis said.

Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata head coach Maradona was discharged from hospital a fortnight ago following brain surgery, having undergone a routine operation for a subdural haematoma after being admitted to hospital due to concerns over anaemia and dehydration.

Maradona, who went on to coach Argentina at the 2010 World Cup, had been hospitalised just days after turning 60.

He appeared in a fragile state when he briefly made an appearance as his Gimnasia side played a match on the evening of his birthday last month.

Maradona won 91 caps for Argentina between 1977 and 1994, scoring 34 goals at international level.

He started his career with Argentinos Juniors before joining Boca Juniors and went on to play for Barcelona, Napoli, Sevilla and Newell's Old Boys before returning to Boca in 1995.

Maradona also had stints in charge of Textil Mandiyu, Racing Club, Al-Wasl, Fujairah and Dorados de Sinaloa in Mexico before being appointed by Gimnasia last year.

Boca Juniors head coach Miguel Angel Russo said "the greatest of all just left us" after the death of his former team-mate, Diego Maradona.

Maradona, regarded as arguably the greatest footballer ever, died aged 60 after a suspected heart attack on Wednesday.

Russo was a former Argentina team-mate of Maradona's and the Boca coach was saddened by his death.

"I feel a big sorrow, a deep pain as he was the greatest player in Argentina and the world," he told reporters.

"I had the chance to be his team-mate for the national team and we shared many things. He gave so many things to the Argentinian people and the sport of football.

"The greatest of all just left us."

Russo shared his memories of Maradona, who led Argentina to the 1986 World Cup title, with the pair having also coached against one another earlier this year when Boca beat Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata.

"The best of our memories together will stay with me. We have lots of stories together," he said.

"I feel a deep pain and a big sorrow, but we all are aware of how much he gave to the Argentinian football, his joy was all about playing."

Russo added: "There are lots of memories. When having lunch, I loved eating an orange but then he started playing with it [like a ball] and making it softer.

"So I always told him, 'Diego, I'm starving, please give me that already', as the orange never touched the ground."

Boca, where Maradona had two spells as a player, had their Copa Libertadores clash against Internacional, scheduled for Wednesday, postponed.

Russo thanked CONMEBOL for postponing the last-16 first leg.

"The squad and I were having lunch but then our mood changed on hearing the news. We just knew at the moment what we had to do," he said.

"I appreciate that CONMEBOL understood the situation for Boca. It just wasn't the right moment to play a football game."

Luis Milla recalled fond memories of training and playing with Argentina and Napoli great Diego Maradona at LaLiga powerhouse Barcelona.

Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata head coach Maradona – arguably football's greatest ever player – died at the age of 60 after a suspected heart attack, the Argentine Football Association (AFA) confirmed on Wednesday.

Maradona was discharged from hospital a fortnight ago following brain surgery, having undergone a routine operation for a subdural haematoma after being admitted to hospital due to concerns over anaemia and dehydration.

Maradona had the best years of his club career in Italy, playing a massive part in Napoli winning the Serie A title in the 1986-87 and 1989-90 seasons, having arrived from Barca in 1984.

The World Cup winner celebrated three trophies during his time at Camp Nou, where he claimed Copa del Rey, Copa de la Liga and Supercopa de Espana glory in 1983.

Former team-mate Milla, who emerged from Barca's youth team in 1984 and went on to represent the Catalan giants before joining bitter rivals Real Madrid in 1990, hailed Maradona.

"When he was there [at Barca], I was playing in the youth team and [Cesar Luis] Menotti, who was the main coach then used to organise matches every Thursday between the first team and a selection of players from the academy," Milla, who also faced Maradona during his time at Sevilla, told Stats Perform News.

"We played many games against the first team. For me, having at that at 18 years old, you can imagine the dream of playing against Maradona. Then when he came back to Spain, I also played against him when I was a Real Madrid player.

"We who belong to his era and also younger players have seen his football. Someone that has been able to win a World Cup in the way that he did, and be so important for that national team, he was so great, even though I believe that he could has been better in terms of performing if you look at his talent and peaks."

Maradona, who went on to coach his country at the 2010 World Cup, had been hospitalised just days after turning 60.

He appeared in a fragile state when he briefly made an appearance as his Gimnasia side played a match on the evening of his birthday last month.

Maradona won 91 caps for Argentina between 1977 and 1994, scoring 34 goals at international level.

He started his career with Argentinos Juniors before joining Boca Juniors and went on to play for Barcelona, Napoli, Sevilla and Newell's Old Boys before returning to Boca in 1995.

Maradona also had stints in charge of Textil Mandiyu, Racing Club, Al-Wasl, Fujairah and Dorados de Sinaloa in Mexico before being appointed by Gimnasia last year.

From the slums of Buenos Aires to the face of football. Former England midfielder Peter Reid hailed Diego Maradona following his death.

Maradona – arguably football's greatest ever player – died at the age of 60 after a suspected heart attack, the Argentine Football Association (AFA) confirmed on Wednesday.

Argentina and Napoli great Maradona was discharged from hospital a fortnight ago following brain surgery, having undergone a routine operation for a subdural haematoma after the World Cup winner was admitted to hospital due to concerns over anaemia and dehydration.

Reid came up against Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata head coach Maradona on the international stage and he told Stats Perform News: "He is like, in Argentina and Napoli – Naples – he is like God. He is like the King, royalty and that's Diego Maradona.

Englishman Reid also recalled Maradona's infamous 'Hand of God' goal and his stunner against England at the 1986 World Cup.

Hailed by many as the greatest goal of all time, Maradona picked up the ball inside his own half and dribbled past four England players before calmly rounding Peter Shilton in the quarter-final clash – Reid one of the players left behind during the mesmerising run.

The moment of magic arrived four minutes after Maradona handled the ball and scored as Argentina eventually went on to claim the World Cup 34 years ago in Mexico.

"Well, he cheated, he cheated in the first goal," Reid said. "The second was an artist at work, at the best of his ability. I got to talk to him – through an interpreter – on a couple of occasions. He was a very warm human being and I think his legacy – I think he was a flawed character, I think his drug abuse was well known and that might have caught up with him.

"But, I tend to go on the positives, on what he did on the football pitch; and what he did for the nation; and what he did for the likes of Napoli and Boca Juniors. I mean, you watch a game for Boca Juniors and there's still flags for him and there's flags in Naples about him. I mean the legacy is magnificent. So yeah, a flawed character, but was that because he didn't get any privacy?

"Don't forget he was born in the slums of Buenos Aires and he made his way up to the pinnacle of his career. You've got to give him all the credit in the world for that. Yeah, we are all human beings and we have all got faults. I tend to look at his plus points, which is [that] he was one of the greatest players to ever walk the planet."

Maradona, who went on to coach his country at the 2010 World Cup, had been hospitalised just days after turning 60.

He appeared in a fragile state when he briefly made an appearance as his Gimnasia side played a match on the evening of his birthday last month.

Maradona won 91 caps for Argentina between 1977 and 1994, scoring 34 goals at international level.

He started his career with Argentinos Juniors before joining Boca Juniors and went on to play for Barcelona, Napoli, Sevilla and Newell's Old Boys before returning to Boca in 1995.

Maradona had the best years of his club career in Italy, playing a massive part in Napoli winning the Serie A title in the 1986-87 and 1989-90 seasons.

Playmaker Maradona also lifted the UEFA Cup with Napoli in 1989 and he won three trophies during his time at Barca – including the Copa del Rey in 1983.

Maradona also had stints in charge of Textil Mandiyu, Racing Club, Al-Wasl, Fujairah and Dorados de Sinaloa in Mexico before being appointed by Gimnasia last year.

"At Barcelona I think injuries hindered him," Reid added. "But when he went to Napoli, 'wow'. I mean, if you go to Napoli, he is like – is it fair to say God? He is like a God there. I mean I know it is a ridiculous statement, but he is!

"And the other thing, I went to Argentina an awful lot watching football when I was a manager and a coach in Buenos Aires. And if you ask 99.9 per cent of Argentinians who the best player ever was, they will say Diego Maradona. Now why I am saying that is because of Lionel Messi who, let's have it right, is unbelievable. But, am I going to argue with Argentinians? No, no."

Diego Maradona dragged Argentina to World Cup glory, triumphed in Italy and Europe with Napoli and won countless individual honours.

Along the way, the footballing great – who died on Wednesday at the age of 60 – scored some of the greatest goals the game has ever seen.

No matter the occasion, or indeed the opponent, Maradona was often unplayable – as can be seen from our selection of his five greatest ever goals.

 

Argentina v England (June 22, 1986)

Hailed by many as the greatest goal of all time, Maradona picked up the ball inside his own half and dribbled past four England players before calmly rounding Peter Shilton.

The moment of magic arrived four minutes after the infamous 'Hand of God' goal and helped Argentina into the semi-finals of the 1986 World Cup, which they went on to win.

 

Argentina v Belgium (June 25, 1986)

The goal scored by Maradona three days later, this time in the semi-finals, was not too dissimilar in that he had four opposition players between himself and the goal.

He slalomed between two of them, jinked past another – in the process taking out a fourth – and fired past Jean-Marie Pfaff for his second goal of the contest.

Napoli v Juventus (November 3, 1985)

Napoli ended their 12-year wait for a league victory over rivals Juventus thanks to Maradona's brilliance of a different kind. If the previous goals were all about neat footwork and clinical finishing, this was more to do with sheer audacity.

A large wall, set five metres from the ball, was not enough to stop the Argentine maestro delicately lifting the indirect free-kick into the one spot Stefano Tacconi could not reach.

Napoli v Hellas Verona (October 20, 1985)

This one was all about the technique - and the confidence to even think about taking it on. Maradona brought down the ball with his first touch, turned and sent a long-range drive flying over Giuliano Giuliani from a good 40 yards out.

What made it all the more special is that this strike came in a 5-0 thrashing of Verona, who were the reigning Serie A champions at the time.

Boca Juniors v River Plate (April 10, 1981)

Maradona spent a season with Boca Juniors before arriving in Europe and it soon became clear what a talent he would become.

His first spell at the club may have been short but he left behind plenty of memories, including a goal at the home of bitter rivals River Plate. With the angle against him, he squeezed in an effort with a masterful finish from the wing.

FIFA president Gianni Infantino has paid tribute to Diego Maradona, describing the Argentina legend as "simply immense".

Napoli great Maradona died aged 60 on Wednesday after reportedly suffering a heart attack.

Argentina president Alberto Fernandez has declared three days of national mourning after the news of Maradona's passing.

The former attacking midfielder, who was the player of the tournament when he captained his country to World Cup glory in 1986, is one of the all-time greats and Infantino says he deserves "eternal gratitude" for what he brought to football. 

Infantino told FIFA's official website: "Today is an unbelievably sad day. Our Diego left us. Our hearts – of all of us who loved him for how he was, and for what he represented – have stopped beating for a moment. 

"Our silence, our tears, our pain is the only thing we are feeling deep inside us at this time.

"I always said it and I can just repeat it now, more convinced than ever: What Diego has done for football, for making all of us fall in love with this beautiful game, is unique. 

"It is, as he is, simply immense. Diego deserves our eternal gratitude for that, for having amazed us with his incredible talent and yes, for having been so unique. For having been Diego Armando Maradona, a legend, a hero, and a man.

"Diego may be eternal now, but for forever, Diego will also have a most prominent place in the incredible story of all football fairy tales. 

"Our deepest sympathy goes to his family and friends at this difficult time. Rest in peace, dear Diego. We love you."

Maradona won the Serie A title twice during the best years of his club career at Napoli, while he also played for Barcelona, Sevilla, Argentinos Juniors, Boca Juniors and Newell's Old Boys.

He embarked on a coaching career after retiring, including a spell in charge of his country.

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