The New York Mets fired general manager Jared Porter on Tuesday, a day after it was reported he sent unsolicited text messages and lewd images to a female reporter in 2016.

The Mets hired the 41-year-old Porter only last month, but new team owner Steven Cohen announced his firing on Twitter.

Cohen wrote: "We have terminated Jared Porter this morning. In my initial press conference I spoke about the importance of integrity and I meant it. There should be zero tolerance for this type of behavior."

In response to a question about the firing of Porter, Cohen added: "No action would of set a poor example to the culture I'm trying to build."

Shortly after Cohen’s tweet, the Mets issued a statement from team president Sandy Alderson.

It read: "The New York Mets have terminated general manager Jared Porter, effective immediately. Jared's actions, as reflected by events disclosed last night, failed to meet the Mets' standards for professionalism and personal conduct."

Porter was the Chicago Cubs' director of professional scouting in 2016 when ESPN said he began sending unsolicited and inappropriate text messages and images to the reporter after meeting her in June of that year.

He has yet to make a public comment on ESPN's allegations.

Porter spent the next four seasons with the Arizona Diamondbacks as their senior vice president and assistant general manager.

Free agent All-Star closer Liam Hendriks signed a four-year $54-million contract with the Chicago White Sox on Friday.

Hendriks has left the Oakland Athletics to join the White Sox and the pitcher receives a $1m signing bonus.

The 31-year-old Australian will be paid $11m this year, then receive $13m in 2022 and a further $14m in 2023.

Chicago hold a $15m option or $15m buyout for 2024. If the club option is declined, the buyout will be paid in 10 equal instalments between 2024–33.

Hendriks was named in the All-MLB First Team last year and could be a key signing in the White Sox's quest to win the 2021 World Series title.

White Sox senior vice president/general manager Rick Hahn said: "With the acquisition of Liam, we are adding another premium talent to our core group of players.

"Liam is someone of outstanding character and make-up who will be an asset both on the field and in the clubhouse.

"He gives Tony [general manager La Russa] and Ethan [pitching coach Katz] another weapon to make our bullpen even deeper and more versatile."

The New York Yankees are reportedly finalising a deal to re-sign second baseman DJ LeMahieu.

According to Jeff Passan of ESPN, LeMahieu is set to sign a six-year, $90million contract to stay in the Bronx.

That payday follows a stellar second season with the Yankees, who reached the American League Divisional Series but lost to the Tampa Bay Rays in five games.

LeMahieu finished the season with 10 home runs and 27 RBIs, leading MLB with a batting average of .364.

He was also first in the American League in on-base percentage (.421) and on-base percentage plus slugging percentage (1.011).

The infielder's efforts saw him finish third in the American League MVP voting and he was the second base silver slugger for the second straight year.

The Yankees are due to begin their spring training schedule on February 27 against the Detroit Tigers. Their regular season is scheduled to get under way on April 1 with a meeting with the Toronto Blue Jays.

Tommy Lasorda, who led the Los Angeles Dodgers to two World Series titles and became one of the franchise's most beloved and iconic figures, died on Thursday at the age of 93. 

The Dodgers announced Lasorda's death on Friday in a statement. According to the team, he suffered a sudden heart attack on Thursday, just two days after being released from a long hospital stay. 

Lasorda spent 71 years with the Dodgers organisation as a player, scout, coach, manager and front office executive. He retired from managing in 1996 after a 21-year run highlighted by World Series championships in 1981 and 1988. 

"In a franchise that celebrated such great legends of the game, no one who wore the uniform embodied the Dodger spirit as much as Tommy Lasorda," team president and CEO Stan Kasten said in a statement. "A tireless spokesman for baseball, his dedication to the sport and the team he loved was unmatched. He was a champion who at critical moments seemingly willed his team to victory. The Dodgers and their fans will miss him terribly. 

"Tommy is quite simply irreplaceable and unforgettable."

Lasorda had a short major-league career as a left-handed pitcher with the Dodgers and Kansas City Athletics from 1954-56 before retiring as a player in 1960 and joining the Dodgers as a scout the following year. He later managed several of the organisation’s minor league teams before being promoted to serve as the major league club's bench coach under Hall of Famer Walter Alston in 1973. 

He took over managerial duties following Alston's retirement near the end of the 1976 season and began one of the longest tenures with one team in major league history. He is one of only four skippers, along with Alston and Hall of Famers Connie Mack and John McGraw, to manage the same team for 20 consecutive seasons or more. 

A two-time National League Manager of the Year, Lasorda compiled a 1,599-1,439 overall record and led the Dodgers to seven National League West titles and eight playoff appearances while reaching the World Series four times. He later guided the United States to a gold medal at the 2000 Sydney Olympics. 

Lasorda moved into a role as the Dodgers' vice president following his retirement in 1996 and was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1997. He had served as a special advisor to the team since 2004 and was present at Texas' Globe Life Field for the Dodgers' Game 6 victory over the Tampa Bay Rays in October that clinched the franchise's first World Series title since his 1988 squad. 

"It feels appropriate that in his final months, he saw his beloved Dodgers win the World Series for the first time since his 1998 team," MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement. "On behalf of Major League Baseball, I send my deepest sympathy to his wife of 70 years, Jo, and their entire family, the Dodger organisation and their generations of loyal fans."

Lasorda had been plagued by health issues in recent years. A heart attack led to his retirement from managing in 1996 and he suffered another in 2012. He was admitted to a California hospital with heart-related problems in November and spent several weeks in intensive care before being released earlier this week.  

A native of Norristown, Pennsylvania, Lasorda is survived by his wife, Jo; his daughter, Laura and one granddaughter.

Tommy Lasorda, who led the Los Angeles Dodgers to two World Series titles and became one of the franchise's most beloved and iconic figures, died on Thursday at the age of 93. 

The Dodgers announced Lasorda's death on Friday in a statement. According to the team, he suffered a sudden heart attack on Thursday, just two days after being released from a long hospital stay. 

Lasorda spent 71 years with the Dodgers organisation as a player, scout, coach, manager and front office executive. He retired from managing in 1996 after a 21-year run highlighted by World Series championships in 1981 and 1988. 

"In a franchise that celebrated such great legends of the game, no one who wore the uniform embodied the Dodger spirit as much as Tommy Lasorda," team president and CEO Stan Kasten said in a statement. "A tireless spokesman for baseball, his dedication to the sport and the team he loved was unmatched. He was a champion who at critical moments seemingly willed his team to victory. The Dodgers and their fans will miss him terribly. 

"Tommy is quite simply irreplaceable and unforgettable."

Lasorda had a short major-league career as a left-handed pitcher with the Dodgers and Kansas City Athletics from 1954-56 before retiring as a player in 1960 and joining the Dodgers as a scout the following year. He later managed several of the organisation’s minor league teams before being promoted to serve as the major league club's bench coach under Hall of Famer Walter Alston in 1973. 

He took over managerial duties following Alston's retirement near the end of the 1976 season and began one of the longest tenures with one team in major league history. He is one of only four skippers, along with Alston and Hall of Famers Connie Mack and John McGraw, to manage the same team for 20 consecutive seasons or more. 

A two-time National League Manager of the Year, Lasorda compiled a 1,599-1,439 overall record and led the Dodgers to seven National League West titles and eight playoff appearances while reaching the World Series four times. He later guided the United States to a gold medal at the 2000 Sydney Olympics. 

Lasorda moved into a role as the Dodgers' vice president following his retirement in 1996 and was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1997. He had served as a special advisor to the team since 2004 and was present at Texas' Globe Life Field for the Dodgers' Game 6 victory over the Tampa Bay Rays in October that clinched the franchise's first World Series title since his 1988 squad. 

"It feels appropriate that in his final months, he saw his beloved Dodgers win the World Series for the first time since his 1998 team," MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement. "On behalf of Major League Baseball, I send my deepest sympathy to his wife of 70 years, Jo, and their entire family, the Dodger organisation and their generations of loyal fans."

Lasorda had been plagued by health issues in recent years. A heart attack led to his retirement from managing in 1996 and he suffered another in 2012. He was admitted to a California hospital with heart-related problems in November and spent several weeks in intensive care before being released earlier this week.  

A native of Norristown, Pennsylvania, Lasorda is survived by his wife, Jo; his daughter, Laura and one granddaughter.

Francisco Lindor's time in Cleveland has come to an end, as the Indians moved the four-time All-Star to the New York Mets in a blockbuster six-player trade announced on Thursday. 

The Mets will also receive starting pitcher Carlos Carrasco in the deal, with Cleveland getting infielders Amed Rosario and Andres Gimenez and a pair of prospects in pitcher Josh Wolf and outfielder Isaiah Greene. 

Lindor has been one of the game's premier shortstops, and the face of the Cleveland franchise, since breaking into the majors in 2015. The 27-year-old was the runner-up in voting for the American League's Rookie of the Year in 2015 and has won two Silver Slugger awards as well as a pair of Gold Gloves during his six-year career. 

The Puerto Rico native is set to be a free agent after this season, however, and an inability to agree to terms on a contract extension forced Cleveland to field offers from interested teams. 

Lindor joins a Mets organisation with grand designs under new owner Steve Cohen and who have been one of the more aggressive teams this offseason. New York previously added catcher James McCann and reliever Trevor May in free agency, while pitcher Marcus Stroman accepted an $18.9million qualifying offer to return. 

A career .285 hitter, Lindor has averaged 29 home runs, 86 RBIs and 21 steals over his six major league seasons. 

The Mets also add a valuable piece to the rotation in Carrasco, who went 88-73 with a 3.77 ERA in 11 seasons with Cleveland. The 33-year-old right-hander won 35 games between the 2017 and 2018 seasons before missing most of the 2019 campaign when diagnosed with leukaemia. 

Carrasco successfully fought off the disease to make 12 regular-season starts in 2020, going 3-4 with a 2.91 ERA and winning a second straight AL Comeback Player of the Year award. 

Rosario is the most experienced of the players Cleveland got in return and figures to slot in as Lindor's replacement at shortstop. The 25-year-old's last full season in the majors was a solid one as he batted .287 with 15 homers, 72 RBIs and 19 stolen bases. 

Gimenez, 22, made his major league debut last season and hit .263 with three homers and 12 RBIs in 49 games. 

Wolf and Greene were ranked as the Mets' number nine and number 10 overall prospects by MLB.com. Wolf was a second-round pick by New York in 2019, while Greene was taken in the second round of the 2020 draft and has yet to make his professional debut.

The Negro Leagues are now an official part of MLB history after being reclassified as a major league by the Commissioner’s Office on Wednesday. 

The decision allows approximately 3,400 players who competed in the seven professional Negro Leagues during baseball’s period of segregation to be recognised as official MLB players whose statistics will now be incorporated into its records. 

The Negro Leagues operated between 1920 and 1948, one year after Jackie Robinson broke MLB’s colour barrier when he took the field for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Those leagues had been omitted when MLB’s Special Committee on Baseball Records convened in 1969 to determine which professional organisations would be classified as major leagues along with the American and National Leagues. 

Since the Negro Leagues dissolved, 35 former players have been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame 

"All of us who love baseball have long known that the Negro Leagues produced many of our game’s best players, innovations and triumph against a backdrop of injustice," MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement.

"We are now grateful to count the players of the Negro Leagues where they belong: as Major Leaguers within the official historical record."

MLB added that it will begin a review process to determine how to incorporate team and player statistics into its record books. 

The announcement also comes during the 100th anniversary of the first Negro League.

MLB previously commemorated the landmark with a joint donation with the Players’ Association of 1 million US dollars to the Negro League Baseball Museum in Kansas City, and held a "Salute to the Negro Leagues" game in September in which the St. Louis Cardinals and Kansas City Royals donned throwback jerseys of former teams.  

New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone insisted DJ LeMahieu is the "number one priority" for the MLB franchise amid free agency.

LeMahieu is one of the most sought-after free agents this offseason after winning the 2020 American League (AL) batting title with an MLB-best .364 average – ahead of Juan Soto (.351), Freddie Freeman (.341), Marcell Ozuna (.338) and Trea Turner (.335).

The three-time All-Star and Gold Glove Award winner became the first Yankees player since Bernie Williams in 1998 to claim the honour, while he also earned All-MLB First Team selection for a second successive season.

LeMahieu, who hit 10 homers, tallied 71 runs and registered 27 RBIs last season, reportedly rejected the Yankees' $18.9million qualifying offer for the 2021 campaign but Boone said the team remain committed to bringing the 32-year-old back to New York.

"I think it's no secret that he is probably our number one priority to bring back this winter," Boone said on Tuesday.

"I know [general manager Brian Cashman] is working on that. And hopefully, at the end of all this, DJ is a Yankee for a long time."

LeMahieu, who ranked second for batting average in the AL in 2019, also won the National League (NL) batting title during his time with the Colorado Rockies in 2016 – the two-time Silver Slugger becoming the first player to win undisputed batting titles in both leagues.

He also became the first Yankees player to lead the MLB in hitting since Mickey Mantle in 1956.

Boone added: "There's not much more to say about DJ other than, I think if we look over 2019 through 2020, and did a two-year MVP in the American League, it's probably him.

"His play completely speaks for itself. Then you couple the fact that he's this really great team-mate that's been, despite his quiet reputation, a tremendous leader for us and an influential person by the way he goes about things."

Cleveland will no longer be called the "Indians", the team have confirmed.

The MLB club announced in July they were considering a change, with the NFL's Washington "Redskins" also reviewing a name deemed offensive by Native American groups.

Washington soon became the Washington Football Team, and Cleveland have now followed suit.

A statement on Monday said: "Since July, we have conducted an extensive process to learn how our team name affected different constituencies and whether it aligned with our organisational values.

"As a result of that process, we have decided to move forward with changing the current team name and determining a new, non-Native American-based name for the franchise.

"We believe our organisation is at its best when we can unify our community and bring people together - and we believe a new name will allow us to do this more fully."

Cleveland were originally known as the Blues before switching to the Broncos and then the Naps. The Indians name started in the 1915 season.

Team owner and chairman Paul Dolan said: "Hearing first-hand the stories and experiences of Native American people, we gained a deeper understanding of how tribal communities feel about the team name and the detrimental effects it has on them.

"We also spoke to local civic leaders who represent diverse populations in our city and who highlighted the negative impact our team name has had on our broader population and on under-represented groups across our community.

"I am truly grateful for their engagement and input, which I found enlightening and insightful.

"When a sports team is aligned with its community, it unlocks the ability to unite people from different backgrounds and bring people together in support of their home team.

"While 'Indians' will always be a part of our history, it is time to move forward and work to unify our stakeholders and fans through a new name."

Dolan also wrote an open letter to Cleveland fans, saying decisions on a future name "are complex and will take time".

Cleveland dropped their Chief Wahoo logo from their game jerseys and caps two years ago because it was deemed racist and offensive.

Kyle Schwarber is a free agent after the Chicago Cubs non-tendered the 2016 MLB World Series hero, though he could still return to Wrigley Field.

Schwarber was in the final year of arbitration, but the Cubs opted to make the star outfielder a free agent after six seasons, while tendering contacts to 2016 National League (NL) MVP Kris Bryant, Javier Baez and Willson Contreras on Wednesday.

The 27-year-old Schwarber was a key member of the Cubs team that ended their 108-year championship drought, having returned from a severe left knee injury.

Schwarber produced a three-hit performance in Game 7 of the World Series against the Cleveland Indians four years ago – he finished with seven hits, two RBIs and two runs in five games as the Cubs emerged triumphant.

"Listen, he's always going to be a Cubs legend," Cubs president of baseball operations Jed Hoyer said. "There's no question about that, as he should be.

"It was a hard conversation. I called Kyle. Expressed that we're definitely going to keep the door open. We have and will continue to talk to [his agent] about ways to bring him back.

"So, I wanted to express that to him, but also to express that if that doesn't work out, just all the affection we've had for all he's done. I don't think the door is closed, but we had a good conversation."

Schwarber made his MLB debut for the Cubs in 2015 after being drafted a year earlier.

During the coronavirus-hit 2020 season, Schwarber tallied 30 runs on 36 hits in 59 games, while recording 11 home runs and 24 RBIs as the Cubs were swept by the Miami Marlins in the Wild Card Series.

Schwarber was the fastest to 100 career home runs among all players ever to debut with the Cubs, and his career rate of 14.9 at-bats per home run is second to only Sammy Sosa (12.8) in franchise history.

Since entering the league, Schwarber has appeared in 551 games, registered 295 runs, 416 hits, 121 homers and 279 RBIs at .230.

The Atlanta Braves signed right-handed pitcher and free agent Charlie Morton following his exploits during the Tampa Bay Rays' run to the MLB World Series.

Morton returns to the Braves on a one-year, $15million deal, having been drafted by Atlanta in 2002, while he debuted in 2008 before leaving the following year.

The two-time All-Star played a key role as Tampa Bay reached the World Series for the first time in 12 years in the shortened season amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Tampa Bay turned down a $15m club option as Morton opted to reunite with the Braves, who fell to eventual champions the Los Angeles Dodgers in the National League Championship Series (NLCS).

A World Series winner with the Houston Astros in 2017, Morton tallied 42 strikeouts and an ERA of 4.74 in nine regular-season appearances in 2020.

The 37-year-old stepped up in the playoffs, with 23 strikeouts and a 2.70 ERA in four games, while he had a 3-1 win-loss record.

Morton also became the only pitcher in MLB history with four winner-take-all victories after pitching 5.2 scoreless innings as the Rays prevailed in the American League Championship Series (ALCS).

"We saw him trending back to where he was in 2019," Braves president of baseball operations Alex Anthopoulos said. "In September and into the postseason, his stuff was back to where it was in 2019."

After debuting for the Braves 12 years ago, Morton was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates in 2009 and he spent seven seasons at the NL franchise.

A brief spell with the Philadelphia Phillies followed before moving to the Astros and then the Rays in 2019.

November 2, 2016 was a night many Chicago Cubs fans never thought they would see.

After generations of fans witnessed their beloved Cubs come up short, the 2016 team ended the franchise's 108-year title drought by capturing the World Series.

The events that transpired that night in Cleveland – as well as the raucous celebrations taking place 350 miles to the west in Chicago – were set in motion five years earlier when the Cubs named Theo Epstein the team's president of baseball operations in October 2011. And just over four years after the Cubs hoisted the championship trophy, Epstein determined that his time with the franchise had come to an end, announcing Tuesday he would be stepping down from his position.

His contract was set to expire at the end of the 2021 season, and he was then expected to move on with general manager Jed Hoyer filling his position. Over the last few months, however, Epstein decided that since the franchise is facing several big personnel questions this offseason that will shape the future of the team, and that the one making the decisions should be around for the long haul, so Hoyer will take over now.

Epstein will forever be remembered in the Cubs' storied history – as well as the Boston Red Sox's – for delivering a championship to a long-suffering fan base. Though a Cubs dynasty never materialised like some fans envisioned after the 2016 title, Epstein successfully transformed a team known as the loveable losers into perennial contenders.

"The best part of this journey with the Cubs has been the feeling of togetherness: the friendships, trust, camaraderie, and collaboration inside the organisation as well as the deep connection with the fans," Epstein wrote in a letter to Cubs fans.

"Nine years ago, after I laid out some lofty goals at my introductory press conference — a pledge to create a foundation for sustained success that would mean playing baseball regularly in October as well as a promise, over time and together, to build a team that would ultimately win the World Series — our first act as a baseball department was to set out a collective vision for how we could meet those goals and make our fans proud."

Building a contender began with "The Plan".

Epstein had no intention in competing immediately, his vision was a complete tear down to rebuild with high draft picks of position players, develop those picks into a core of the team and acquire pitchers.

As far as being bad in those first few years under Epstein's watch, the Cubs excelled.

In his first three seasons at the helm, the Cubs had the league's second-worst winning percentage at .412. Chicago's poor play, however, led to high draft picks, and Epstein and the Cubs drafted Albert Almora Jr., Kris Bryant, Kyle Schwarber and Ian Happ with top-10 picks from 2012-15.

Over that same span, the Cubs traded for Anthony Rizzo, Jake Arrieta and Kyle Hendricks, and prior to the start of the 2015 season, they signed free agent Jon Lester. Also before the 2015 season, they landed highly coveted manager Joe Maddon.

With the core in place, the Cubs went from 73 wins in 2014 to 97 victories in 2015 and a berth in the National League Championship Series (NLCS) – their first since 2003. Over the last six seasons, their 505 wins are the third most in baseball behind only the Los Angeles Dodgers (528) and Houston Astros (510).

Excluding the 2020 season because of the truncated 60-game schedule amid the coronavirus pandemic, the five-year stretch from 2015-19 was also one of the best in franchise history – the 471 wins only behind the 530 between 1906 and 1910.

Four straight 90-win seasons from 2015-18, helped the Cubs pile up many of those victories. Since 2015, only the Dodgers have more 90-win seasons.

What makes the Cubs' recent success even more incredible is that it followed a particularly forgettable four-decade stretch. Chicago had the fewest seasons with 90-plus wins between 1970 and 2014 with four, only the Miami Marlins and Colorado Rockies (both two) fared worse.

With the exception of the Cubs, every other team on the list – including the San Diego Padres, Arizona Diamondbacks, Seattle Mariners, Tampa Bay Rays and Toronto Blue Jays – started in the division era, and the two clubs with fewer 90-win seasons than the Cubs did not even begin play until 1993. So, Chicago had 23 more opportunities than the Rockies and Marlins to reach 90 wins in a season, 28 more seasons than the Diamondbacks and Rays (both started in 1998) and seven more than the Mariners and Blue Jays (both started in 1977). The Padres first season was in 1969.

Chicago's turnaround was a result of Epstein's moves and the team's player development. Bryant would go on to win the 2015 NL Rookie of the Year Award, while Arrieta took home that year's NL Cy Young Award. A year later, Bryant earned NL MVP honours, Lester finished second in 2016 NL Cy Young voting while Hendricks finished third.

While Arrieta signed with the Philadelphia Phillies after 2017 and Epstein inked Yu Darvish prior to 2018, the tandem of Lester and Hendricks has been one of the most reliable in the majors over the past six seasons.

Since 2015, the Cubs' pitching staff has posted the majors' third-best ERA at 3.66, while Lester (77 wins), Hendricks (62) and Arrieta (54) are also one of just two trios to have at least 50 wins for one team - along with the Cleveland Indians' Carlos Carrasco (69), Corey Kluber (67) and Trevor Bauer (61).

With Hendricks, Lester and 2020 NL Cy Young runner-up Darvish heading the rotation, the offense has compiled the majors' second-highest on-base percentage since 2015 at .332 behind a familiar line-up.

Rizzo and Bryant have each made three All-Star teams, while shortstop Javier Baez – the Cubs' first-round pick from the year before Epstein took over in 2011 – has earned two trips to the Midsummer Classic. Those three stars along with Schwarber have provided consistent home-run power only two other teams can match over the past six seasons – the Minnesota Twins and Houston Astros with four players with 100 or more homers since 2015.

The Cubs have had an incredible run since 2015, reaching the postseason five times – one of four teams with at least five playoff berths in the last six seasons, along with the Dodgers, Astros and New York Yankees. Not every move Epstein has made worked to perfection like signing Craig Kimbrel or trading Eloy Jimenez for Jose Quintana. And the team have not won a playoff game since 2017 with their offense inconceivably scoring two, one, one, three, one, one, one and 0 runs in their last eight postseason games, but the last six years overall will still be considered one of the best stretches in Cubs history.

''If you look at my track record in Boston and then here, in the first six years or so, we did some pretty epic things,'' Epstein said Tuesday. ''And then the last couple years weren't as impressive. Maybe what that tells me is I think I'm great at and really enjoy building and transformation and triumphing. Maybe I'm not as good and not as motivated by maintenance.''

Epstein is not sure what the future will bring, but will take the next year off of baseball. At least, working at the ballpark. He did say he plans to buy season tickets for the Cubs to enjoy the game as a fan.

"Getting dropped into this situation nine years ago, feeling like a stranger, Chicago, the Cubs, Cubs fans all being foreign to me," Epstein said. "And now I look, nine years later, and I feel like it's in my blood too. I don't think that would’ve been possible elsewhere. The closeness of the connection with the fans as you go through the Cubs experience, that stands out to me."

New York Mets second baseman Robinson Cano has received a 162-game suspension from MLB for violating the league's Joint Prevention and Treatment Program, ruling him out of the entire 2021 season.

MLB said in a statement on Wednesday that Cano, 38, tested positive for Stanozolol, a banned performance-enhancing substance.

The eight-time All-Star's suspension will begin at the start of the 2021 campaign and prohibits the World Series champion from participating in any postseason games as well. Cano will also forfeit his $24million salary for the upcoming season.

Cano, who batted .316 with 10 home runs and 30 RBIs in 49 games during the abbreviated 2019 season amid the coronavirus pandemic, was previously suspended 80 games in 2018 for testing positive for furosemide, a potential masking agent also on MLB's list of banned substances.

"I understand that everything that goes into my body," Cano said in a statement. "I'm responsible for that."

"We were extremely disappointed to be informed about Robinson's suspension for violating Major League Baseball's Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program," Mets president Sandy Alderson said in a statement. "The violation is very unfortunate for him, the organisation, our fans, and the sport.

"The Mets fully support MLB's efforts toward eliminating performance enhancing substances from the game."

Cano has three seasons remaining on a 10-year, $240m contract he signed with the Seattle Mariners in December 2013 following a distinguished nine-year tenure with the Mets' crosstown rivals the New York Yankees.

The Mets acquired the five-time Silver Slugger and two-time Gold Glove winner from Seattle prior to the 2019 season.

A .303 career hitter, Cano bounced back from a disappointing first season with the Mets in which he batted a career-low .256 in 107 games.

Baseball great Ken Griffey Jr wants to help the Seattle Sounders become the closest thing MLS has to the New York Yankees.

The former Seattle Mariners star has joined the ownership group of the Sounders, which also includes Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson and chart-topping rapper Macklemore.

Griffey, a Baseball Hall of Famer who hit 630 MLB home runs in his career to sit seventh on the all-time list, spent 13 years with the Mariners and retired in 2010.

The 50-year-old father-of-three said of his and wife Melissa's investment in the MLS side: "I wanted to be a part of something, not only for myself, but for my kids to be proud of. This is it.

"You always want to be a part of a winning team. To be on a championship-calibre team and an organisation that wants to win and wants to compete and wants to go out there every single game and put the best product on the field, not only for the guys who are in that locker room, but for the 70,000 people who are watching [in the stadium] and the people who are sitting at home watching, that's important. You want a winner.

"I don't play games to be competitive, I play to win. I want the Sounders to be compared to the Yankees. Twenty-seven, 28 championships. That's what I root for, that's what I want."

Established in 2007, the Sounders won the MLS Cup in 2016 and 2019.

The Yankees were formed in 1901 and have won a record 27 World Series titles.

The Miami Marlins have made Kim Ng the first female general manager in MLB history.

Miami announced the historic hire on Friday, with Ng believed to be the first woman hired as a general manager in any of the four men's major sports leagues in North America.

"I entered Major League Baseball as an intern and, after decades of determination, it is the honour of my career to lead the Marlins as their next general manager," Ng said.

"We are building for the long term in South Florida, developing a forward-thinking, collaborative, creative baseball operation made up of incredibly talented and dedicated staff who have, over the last few years, laid a great foundation for success.

"This challenge is one I don't take lightly. When I got into this business, it seemed unlikely a woman would lead a major league team, but I am dogged in pursuit of my goals.

"My goal is now to bring championship baseball to Miami. I am both humbled and eager to continue building the winning culture our fans expect and deserve."

Ng has over 30 years of experience in MLB having worked with the Chicago White Sox, New York Yankees and the Los Angeles Dodgers, serving as assistant general manager for the latter two.

Since 2011, Ng has worked as senior vice president of baseball operations for MLB.

She now takes the reins of the Marlins front office after a 2020 season that saw them reach the playoffs for the first time since their 2003 World Series win.

The Marlins went 31-29 in a campaign shortened by the coronavirus pandemic, beating the Chicago Cubs in the National League Wild Card Series before being swept by the Atlanta Braves in the Divisional Series.

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