Pablo Matera could face a second round of disciplinary action after Stade Francais said the sacked Argentina captain would be summoned by management when he returns to Paris. 

The 27-year-old was stripped of the Pumas armband and suspended on Tuesday after "discriminatory and xenophobic" social media posts between 2011 and 2013 were discovered. 

The Argentine Rugby Union (UAR) also stood down Guido Petti and Santiago Socino from international duty ahead of Saturday's Tri Nations meeting with Australia. 

A disciplinary process has begun, with the UAR stating: "Although the messages were published between 2011 and 2013 and do not represent the personal integrity the three showed during that time with the Pumas, the Argentine Rugby Union condemns any expression of hatred and we consider it unacceptable that those who express them represent our country." 

The revelation about Matera's comments caused dismay at Stade Francais, the French club he joined from Jaguares 12 months ago. 

In a statement on their website, the club said: "Following the revelations by certain media of posts made in 2012 by player Pablo Matera on the social network Twitter, the Stade Francais Paris club wishes to note its total opposition to these unacceptable remarks and comments. 

"We also want to remember that since his arrival at the club in December 2019, our player has always been irreproachable in his attitude towards his team-mates and opponents, both on and off the pitch. 

"On his return from international duty, the player, who has already publicly apologised, will be summoned by club management."

Pablo Matera has been stripped of the Pumas captaincy and suspended over "discriminatory and xenophobic" social media posts between 2011 and 2013, the Argentine Rugby Union (UAR) has confirmed.

Guido Petti and Santiago Socino have also been stood down from international duty ahead of Saturday's Tri Nations meeting with Australia at Bankwest Stadium.

Further sanctions could follow for the trio after a disciplinary process was initiated.

A UAR statement read: "The Argentine Rugby Union rejects the discriminatory and xenophobic comments published by members of the Pumas squad on social networks.

"Meeting urgently, the board of directors resolves in the first place to revoke the captaincy of Pablo Matera and request the staff to propose a new captain to the board of directors.

"Secondly, to suspend Pablo Matera, Guido Petti and Santiago Socino from the national team until their disciplinary situation is defined.

"Although the messages were published between 2011 and 2013 and do not represent the personal integrity the three showed during that time with the Pumas, the Argentine Rugby Union condemns any expression of hatred and we consider it unacceptable that those who express them represent our country."

Following the publication of the UAR statement, Matera deactivated his Twitter account.

Matera, Petti and Socino all reportedly published apologies on Instagram before setting their profiles to private.

Boca Juniors made a moving tribute to the daughter of club legend Diego Maradona during their 2-0 win over another of his former sides Newell's Old Boys on Sunday.

Argentina great Maradona, regarded by many as the best footballer ever, died at the age of 60 last Wednesday.

Such was his influence on the sport, homage has been paid across the world – from compatriot Lionel Messi revealing a Newell's shirt during a goal celebration earlier in the day, to Napoli confirming plans to rename their stadium Stadio Diego Armando Maradona and revealing an Argentina-inspired fourth kit in their weekend win over Roma.

Boca, where Maradona spent two spells, had their Copa Libertadores clash with Internacional postponed just a few hours after the 1986 World Cup winner died, meaning the visit of Newell's to a mostly empty La Bombonera was their first game since his passing.

Colombia international Edwin Cardona opened the scoring with a free-kick, before the team ran over to the sidelines and produced a Maradona jersey, laid it on the floor and applauded in front of the private box where his visibly emotional daughter Dalma was watching on.

Boca coach Miguel Angel Russo, a former Argentina team-mate of Maradona, said after the game: "I knew it was going to be an uphill struggle. The phrase I used was that, to pay homage to the best in the world, you have to play well and that Boca needed to win.

"It was the best way to pay homage to him, to play this beautiful sport well that he played to an incomparably high level.

"We got through it in the best way. I am happy for the victory. The day has been covered by a blanket because of what Diego Maradona was as a player and person."

Every Boca player wore Maradona's name on the back of their jersey throughout the match and defender Carlos Izquierdoz could not help but feel humbled.

Nevertheless, he believed the team acted responsibly with respect to donning the name of one his country's most famous players.

"The truth is that wearing a name like that on my shirt gave me a little embarrassment, so to speak," he told FOX Sports.

"We tried to do it responsibly. I'm happy for tributes that have been paid to him everywhere. We were able to win, to show that we wanted to play – the best tribute was to give his family a win.

"They were special moments. The truth is that all this generates emotion, remembering such an emblematic player who represented so much for Argentine footballer, the country.

"He always put the flag on his shoulders. He deserved recognition."

Napoli will on Sunday unveil a new fourth kit that pays tribute to Diego Maradona, four days on from the club legend's death.

Maradona, one of football's all-time greats, died of natural causes at the age of 60 on Wednesday.

Although coach of Argentinian side Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata at the time of his death, Maradona was more renowned for his remarkable playing career, during which he inspired his country to 1986 World Cup success and also played for Argentinos Juniors, Boca Juniors, Barcelona, Napoli and Sevilla.

But it was his time in Naples that is remembered as his prime, as he helped them to two Serie A titles, a Coppa Italia and a UEFA Cup crown.

Napoli's current team all took to the pitch in jerseys emblazoned with Maradona's name and iconic number 10 on the back before Thursday's 2-0 Europa League win over Rijeka at Stadio San Paolo, which is set to be renamed Stadio Diego Armando Maradona.

The club's tributes to their greatest ever player do not stop there, as they confirmed on Sunday that a new strip inspired by Maradona and Argentina – which was conceived last year – is set to be revealed and worn against Roma later in the day.

A statement read: "A year ago, together with Kappa, we thought of designing a special jersey that echoes Diego Maradona, his beloved Argentina and the close-knit bond with the people of Naples.

"Our hope was that Diego would be able to see it, perhaps even wear it and share in our excitement about it.

"It was agreed that the new kit would be unveiled on matchday nine of the Serie A campaign, during the match between SSC Napoli and Roma.

"The jersey that the players will don tonight will have an even greater significance than initially intended."

Napoli have not provided any further detail regarding the kit's aesthetics, however graphics accompanying their statement showed prominent blue-and-white stripes, as famously worn by Argentina.

Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata won their first match since the death of head coach and football legend Diego Maradona.

Argentina and Napoli great Maradona – arguably football's greatest ever player – died of natural causes at the age of 60 on Wednesday.

Maradona was buried in a private funeral at the Jardines de Bella Vista cemetery on the outskirts of Buenos Aires after thousands gathered on the streets of the capital to mourn the 1986 World Cup winner on Thursday.

Gimnasia were the first team Maradona had led in his homeland since the mid-1990s after taking charge of the Liga Profesional club last year.

On Saturday, Gimnasia defeated Velez Sarsfield 1-0 away from home on an emotional night.

Maximiliano Coronel's 22nd-minute goal settled the contest in Buenos Aires, where Gimnasia ended a three-match winless streak.

With the victory, Gimnasia surpassed Velez atop Group Six on goal difference through five matchdays.

The win came after Maradona's coaching staff resigned following his death.

Sebastian Mendez – Maradona's assistant coach – had taken over on an interim basis after the former Barcelona attacker was hospitalised earlier this month.

Maradona was discharged from hospital a fortnight ago following brain surgery, having undergone a routine operation for a subdural haematoma after being admitted to hospital due to concerns over anaemia and dehydration.

The captain and inspiration behind Argentina's World Cup success in 1986 before going on to coach his country at the 2010 showpiece, Maradona had been hospitalised just days after turning 60.

Maradona – who also had stints in charge of Textil Mandiyu, Racing Club, Al-Wasl, Fujairah and Dorados de Sinaloa in Mexico – appeared in a fragile state when he briefly made an appearance as his Gimnasia side played a match on the evening of his birthday last month.

"Club Esgrima y La Plata announces with great regret that the coaching staff that accompanied Diego Armando Maradona has decided to resign from their respective positions, irrevocably," a statement read.

"This is a decision that our club understands and one that demonstrates the human quality of the entire work group that Diego Maradona had formed, and that had been developing their work so well.

"The 'Tripero' people thanks you with all their hearts for the work done, the effort and the commitment shown.

"Diego Maradona's era and his work team are already an important part of the history of our club. Diego left as one more 'Tripero', as did all of you."

Play was stopped in the 10th minute of the Serie A clash between Benevento and Juventus as players and coaching staff from both teams paid tribute to Diego Maradona. 

Argentina great Maradona, who lit up the Italian top flight during seven seasons with Napoli, died of natural causes at the age of 60 on Wednesday. 

Tributes have been paid across the sporting world this week, with a minute's silence being held ahead of each Serie A game, during which players will wear black armbands. 

An image of Maradona is also being shown on stadium screens in the 10th minute of each fixture, marking the shirt number he wore, along with a "Ciao Diego" message.

Benevento and Juve players, including Argentina international Paulo Dybala, went a step further with their tributes as play came to a standstill on Saturday for those present to applaud arguably the greatest ever footballer. 

Maradona led Napoli to league titles in 1987 and 1990 and the club plan to rename their San Paolo home in his honour.

Zlatan Ibrahimovic insists Diego Maradona's off-pitch controversies should not take away from fans remembering a man who became a "symbol" of the game.

Maradona passed away aged 60 on Wednesday, with reports suggesting he died from a heart attack.

The Argentina great – a star for Boca Juniors, Barcelona and Napoli during an illustrious playing career – had undergone a brain operation earlier this month.

Ibrahimovic joined in paying tribute to Maradona following the news of his death, writing in a post on his official Instagram account: "Maradona is not dead he is immortal. God gave the world the best gifted football player of all times [sic]. He will live forever and ever."

Maradona had well-documented issues off the field, but Ibrahimovic is adamant he will be remembered for his achievements on it.

"I'm so sorry, because for me Maradona is more than football," Milan's talisman told Sky Italia.

"He has become a religion for many and I was lucky enough to know him and talk to him.

"He is a symbol of what he has done on the pitch. I always judge him for what he did on the pitch; what he did outside, in my opinion, is his problem and not ours. 

"We must remember him for what he did as a footballer and in my opinion, he will be remembered forever. When you see number 10, who do you think about? Maradona. 

"It is a symbol, even today there are those who choose that number for him."

Ibrahimovic believes Maradona – whose death has resulted in a three-day period of mourning in Argentina – "did everything with his heart", something which sets him apart as a unique talent.

"As a person, he did everything with his heart, there were no other motives or thoughts. I don't know if that's the right thing, but that's why the whole world loved him," Ibrahimovic said.

"He was always himself. In today's football, everyone tries to be perfect, but to grow and learn you have to make mistakes. 

"Maradona always did everything with his heart and will always remain number one."

Sam Cane expressed his pride in New Zealand's response to two successive Test defeats, after the All Blacks ran out 38-0 winners over Argentina.

Will Jordan's late double helped cap off a supreme display in Newcastle, as New Zealand took a huge step towards securing the Tri Nations crown.

Their campaign is now over, with two wins and two defeats, though their points difference (+64) should see them clear of Argentina or Australia, who meet next week.

Argentina made history with their first Test win over New Zealand on November 14, but the All Blacks were always in complete control on Saturday as the Pumas were kept out in a game for the first time since June 2016.

"It's extremely satisfying. There's no hiding that we had a tough few weeks, we've had a week off after the loss," said Cane, who laid down a signed All Blacks jersey in tribute to Argentinian legend Diego Maradona prior to kick-off.

"Pretty proud of the work we've put in over the last two weeks. The scoreboard doesn't reflect the first 60 minutes, I reckon.

"Will Jordan's got an uncanny ability to get the ball in open space, so it was awesome for him to come on and have such impact. The way that the Pumas defended to keep us out multiple times is a real credit to how they played and their desire.

"I'm really proud of the way we were able to stay patient, we didn't allow that to frustrate us. We stayed patient and got there in the end."

The last time the All Blacks went on a longer losing streak than two Tests was a five-match span from July to August in 1998, but Cane insists the entire squad understands the expectancy of playing for the three-time world champions.

"It's tough and there's pressure but that’s what playing for the All Blacks is all about," Cane, sporting a nasty cut above his right eye, added.

"I'm proud of how the group stuck together in camp. A happy group and we've worked really hard to get better."

Jordan's cameo from the bench was particularly eye-catching, with the 22-year-old making three clean breaks for a total of 125 metres, scoring his first two international tries and playing a key part in creating Patrick Tuipulotu's late five-pointer.

It merely added gloss to a fine team display, with New Zealand controlling 71 per cent of the ball at McDonald Jones Stadium, the All Blacks having amassed 203 metres by half-time – Argentina managing just 35 in comparison in the opening 40 minutes.

It was a performance with Argentina skipper Pablo Matera put down to the entire team, rather than any individual mistakes.

"We were not clinical. Not enough pressure on the ball. Silly mistakes in defence as well. Not a good day for us," he said.

"I don't think [the changes] were the problem. The guys who played for the first time in the tournament put in a lot of energy.

"It was the whole team, many mistakes and handling errors, so I wouldn't put the mistakes to a name, it was something from the whole team.

"We have to watch the game again, analyse, be really hard on ourselves. Prepare for a good game, a lot of work for the last game of the season. We deserve that, we work really hard."

Will Jordan came off the bench to score two sensational tries as New Zealand returned to form with a dominant 38-0 victory over Argentina to put themselves in pole position for the Tri Nations crown.

Argentina claimed their first competitive win over the All Blacks on November 14, but in their 31st Test meeting it was New Zealand who triumphed in the Newcastle heat to end a two-match losing streak.

Nicolas Sanchez produced a masterclass in the reverse outing, but Argentina's fly-half was kept under lock and key as tries either side of half-time from Dane Coles and Ardie Savea put New Zealand in control.

Ian Foster turned to his bench with just over an hour played, and the changes swiftly paid dividends, 22-year-old Jordan sprinting over for his first two international tries before making a break which led to Patrick Tuipulotu wrapping up a bonus-point win to round off the All Blacks' campaign.

It leaves New Zealand on 11 points with a points difference of 64, meaning Argentina (-28) or Australia (-36) – who face-off next week – will have to turnaround a huge deficit if either of them are to clinch the trophy.

Argentina claimed their first competitive win over the All Blacks on November 14, but in their 31st Test meeting it was New Zealand who triumphed in the Newcastle heat to end a two-match losing streak.

Nicolas Sanchez produced a masterclass in the reverse outing, but Argentina's fly-half was kept under lock and key as tries either side of half-time from Dane Coles and Ardie Savea put New Zealand in control.

Ian Foster turned to his bench with just over an hour played, and the changes swiftly paid dividends, 22-year-old Jordan sprinting over for his first two international tries before making a break which led to Patrick Tuipulotu wrapping up a bonus-point win to round off the All Blacks' campaign.

New Zealand captain Sam Cane laid down an All Blacks shirt in honour of Diego Maradona ahead of kick-off, before a typically fearsome haka set the tone for a fast start.

Jordie Barrett missed a penalty and his older brother Beauden saw a five-pointer disallowed, but New Zealand's early pressure told.

The All Blacks, who finished the first half with 203 metres gained compared to 35 for Argentina, had already won 20 rucks by the 10th minute, and a moment later Coles raced over in the corner after latching onto a looped pass from Richie Mo'unga, who added the extras.

Mo'unga knocked over a penalty as New Zealand kept the momentum going, Akira Ioane lunging in down the left only to hit the touchline before grounding the ball.

Fly-half Mo'unga should have put New Zealand 13-0 up on the stroke of half-time, yet hit the post with a penalty right in front of the sticks.

Argentina's second-half resistance lasted just 12 minutes, with Savea wriggling through after a well-worked line-out.

Mo'unga converted, though New Zealand's push for a bonus point was hitting a Pumas wall until Jordan came on.

Just hree minutes after his introduction, Jordan pounced on a fumble in midfield to race clear and slide in under the sticks.

It was the same story straight from the restart, Jordan intercepting a sloppy pass to burst down the right and seal his double.

Tyrel Lomax's yellow card for a high tackle proved the only blot in New Zealand's copybook, with the All Blacks still finding time to score a sublime team try.

Tuipulotu helped himself to five points at the culmination of a slick break as Argentina were kept scoreless for the first time since losing 27-0 to France in June 2016.

New Zealand presented a signed All Blacks jersey with Diego Maradona's name on the back before Saturday's Rugby Championship clash with Argentina.

Skipper Sam Cane laid the shirt, which bore the number 10, in the middle of the pitch before the hosts' traditional haka ahead of the match in Newcastle.

It was a touching tribute following the Argentinian legend's death on Wednesday at the age of 60.

Maradona attended numerous Pumas matches and was in England to follow the team's fortunes at the 2015 Rugby World Cup.

His passing marked a three-day period of mourning in his home country, where Maradona was held in the highest esteem.

Tributes have poured in from the world of sport and beyond, with many insisting Maradona – who inspired Argentina to glory at the 1986 World Cup – was the greatest player of all time.

Frank Lampard described the late Diego Maradona as a "footballing god" as he revealed the Argentina legend made him fall in love with the sport.

Albiceleste and Napoli great Maradona died this week, aged 60.

Argentina entered three days of mourning, while the city of Naples had a similar response to the passing of one of the greatest footballers of all time.

His death has also prompted tributes from further afield, including reverence from other big names in the game.

Chelsea coach Lampard discussed his feelings towards Maradona prior to this weekend's game against Tottenham, adding he had forgiven the controversial 'Hand of God' goal that helped eliminate England from the 1986 World Cup.

"Diego Maradona was my idol growing up," Lampard told reporters. "I was born into a football family, but he was the player on the world stage who made me fall in love with the game.

"I wasn't even put off by the 'Hand of God'. I was as an England fan, but I got over it as I grew up.

"I was fortunate enough to meet him briefly; he was a footballing god. It is very sad he's not with us."

Diego Maradona was the greatest player of all time, according to Manchester United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer.

Argentina and Napoli legend Maradona died this week, aged 60, prompting tributes from across the sporting world.

And Solskjaer added his voice to the global appreciation as he recounted a story of watching and, briefly, interacting with Maradona as a child.

Solskjaer would go on to play with Cristiano Ronaldo – another potential 'GOAT' – at Old Trafford, but he ranks the late great above all others.

"It was a sad day," Solskjaer said. "For me, Diego Maradona will always be the best player I've seen live.

"I was fortunate enough to see him play or Argentina against Norway in Oslo; they lost 1-0 before the World Cup. I remember a Norwegian lad, Kjetil Osvold, nutmegged him, which was fantastic.

"After the game, I was stood outside the ground, waiting to get a glimpse of him, and I actually touched his shoulder as he walked past the crowd.

"Since then I've had the pleasure of meeting him at Old Trafford. A guy with unbelievable talent on the pitch and a smile always when you see him.

"I've got to say it's a sad day and, for me, he will be the best that's ever played football."

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp described an encounter with the late, great Diego Maradona as "like meeting the Pope".

Argentina and Napoli legend Maradona died this week, aged 60, stunning the football world.

Tributes have poured in for the iconic number 10, with many of the sport's biggest names sharing stories of their experiences.

Klopp met Maradona just once but was no different, describing the feeling in his Liverpool news conference on Friday.

"[He was] the best through my lifetime, who I watched most often," Klopp said.

"Maybe that's not right anymore because I've seen Cristiano [Ronaldo] and [Lionel] Messi as well now a lot, but during my own playing career he was the standout.

"His life shows the nice life you can have as a world-class footballer but also how difficult it can be.

"I met him once; for a player of my level, it was like meeting the Pope, to be honest. That was really special."

However, as his life and career are celebrated following his passing, Klopp wishes Maradona had experienced the same "respect" while he was still alive.

"Football will miss him," he added. "I will miss him.

"And you can see with all the reactions all over the world, if we'd shown our love for him, without asking him for a selfie, if we'd shown him the respect he deserves while he was still alive, I think we could have helped him."

Hernan Crespo was reduced to tears when paying an emotional tribute to Diego Maradona - as a boyhood hero of the late Argentina World Cup winner called for an airport to be named after the superstar.

Maradona's body was buried in a private funeral on Thursday after thousands gathered on the streets of Buenos Aires to mourn the Napoli great, who captained his country to their 1986 World Cup triumph.

Former Argentina striker Crespo, now coach of Argentinian top flight club Defensa y Justicia, spoke of Maradona’s passing on the night his team played out a 1-1 draw with Vasco da Gama in the Copa Sudamericana.

He told ESPN: "What Diego generated in me as a child, a teenager and after I grew up, as a professional ... he has a lot to do with all of this.

"These have been two very difficult days. It is very difficult to train, talk to the boys, find words. We will try to honour him in the best way, which is by playing soccer, respecting his spirit of freedom, fun and a lot of commitment to where he is. We will try to do that.

"Everyone has their own things, their experiences. I am from the golden generation. I lived it, dreamed it and knew it. I am grateful to life for that."

Crespo's voice was full of emotion as he added: "The pain that I have in my soul cannot be explained."

Maradona – arguably the greatest player of all time – died of natural causes at the age of 60 on Wednesday.

His coffin was draped in the Argentina flag at Casa Rosada – the presidential mansion where his body laid in honour amid three days of national mourning – before being transported to a cemetery.

Maradona grew up with Ricardo Enrique Bochini as a hero and the pair later played together for Argentina.

Bochini, 66, said an appropriate tribute would be to name Argentina's main airport, the Ministro Pistarini International Airport, after Maradona.

"The Argentine airport should be Diego Armando Maradona," Bochini said on TyC Sports.

"Maradona made Argentina known across the world. While we are a beautiful country, we know that the World Cups are always seen all over the world and many know Argentina from Maradona."

Bochini had no doubt Argentina were going to win the World Cup, especially after Maradona's stunning second goal against England in the 1986 quarter-finals.

"Diego was in his best moment and everyone was good," Bochini said. "But apart from being the best player in the world, he was also as a team-mate. Always happy, happy, he made jokes with everyone. He was just one more. Besides everything, he played in Italy, but he was Argentine - Argentine. He never forgot it."

Diego Maradona was buried in a private funeral after thousands gathered on the streets of Buenos Aires to mourn the Argentina and Napoli great.

Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata head coach Maradona – arguably football's greatest ever player – died of natural causes at the age of 60 on Wednesday.

Mourners and police clashed at the wake of Maradona as large crowds took to the streets of the Argentina capital to bid farewell to the football legend on Thursday.

Maradona's coffin was draped in the Argentina flag at Casa Rosada – the presidential mansion where his body laid in honour amid three days of national mourning – before being transported to a cemetery.

Away from the chaotic scenes, a private ceremony was held for Maradona's burial at the Jardines de Bella Vista cemetery on the outskirts of the city, which is reportedly where his parents were laid to rest.

Maradona was discharged from hospital a fortnight ago following brain surgery, having undergone a routine operation for a subdural haematoma after being admitted to hospital due to concerns over anaemia and dehydration.

The captain and inspiration behind Argentina's World Cup success in 1986 before going on to coach his country at the 2010 showpiece, Maradona had been hospitalised just days after turning 60.

He appeared in a fragile state when he briefly made an appearance as his Gimnasia side played a match on the evening of his birthday last month.

Maradona won 91 caps for Argentina between 1977 and 1994, scoring 34 goals at international level.

He started his career with Argentinos Juniors before joining Boca Juniors and went on to play for Barcelona, Napoli, Sevilla and Newell's Old Boys before returning to Boca in 1995.

Maradona had the best years of his club career in Italy, playing a massive part in Napoli winning the Serie A title in the 1986-87 and 1989-90 seasons.

Playmaker Maradona also lifted the UEFA Cup with Napoli in 1989 and he won three trophies during his time at Barca – including the Copa del Rey in 1983.

Maradona also had stints in charge of Textil Mandiyu, Racing Club, Al-Wasl, Fujairah and Dorados de Sinaloa in Mexico before being appointed by Gimnasia last year.

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