Andy Murray will miss the Australian Open as a precautionary measure after suffering an injury setback.

Murray feared his career may be over when he withdrew from the first grand slam of 2019 in Melbourne due to a long-term hip injury.

The three-time grand slam champion underwent career-saving hip resurfacing surgery last January and made his comeback only five months later.

Murray won the European Open in October and was expected to play in his first major singles tournament for a year next month, but is taking no chances.

"I've worked so hard to get myself into a situation where I can play at the top level and I’m gutted I’m not going to be able to play in Australia in January," said the 32-year-old, who will also miss the ATP Cup.

"After the AO this year, when I wasn't sure whether I'd be able to play again, I was excited about coming back to Australia and giving my best, and that makes this even more disappointing for me.

"Unfortunately I've had a setback recently and as a precaution, need to work through that before I get back on court competing."

Murray last month revealed he opted not to take any risks with a "bit of an issue" after only playing once for Great Britain in their run to the Davis Cup semi-finals.

Tennis Australia chief executive Craig Tiley said: "I know how excited Andy was about coming back to compete in Australia in January, and how disappointed he is not to make it for 2020,

"Andy's last match at the Australian Open was a five-set roller coaster [against Roberto Bautista Agut in the first round this year] that none of us who witnessed it will ever forget. His determination and iron will was on display for all to see, and it's that fighting spirit that has driven him to come back from a potentially career-ending injury to achieve the results he has this year.

"Although we will miss him in January, we wish him all the very best for his recovery and look forward to seeing him back on court very soon."

Novak Djokovic led the way in a decade of dominance in men's tennis but it was a very different story in the women's game, as 20 different players claimed grand slam titles.

Djokovic won all but one of his 16 majors in the previous 10 years, with Rafael Nadal adding 13 to his tally to move just one adrift of Roger Federer's record haul of 20.

Only six men were grand slam champions in the past decade; Federer on five occasions, Stan Wawrinka and Andy Murray securing three apiece and Marin Cilic winning the 2014 US Open.

It has been much more difficult to predict which women will land the big prizes in the game, summed up by the fact there were four different winners in 2019.

Ash Barty and Bianca Andreescu claimed maiden major titles, while Naomi Osaka and Simona Halep won their second to prevent Serena Williams from matching Margaret Court's record total of 24.

We look back at how the leading lights have measured up in the 2010s and take a glimpse at what might unfold in the next 10 years.

 

RAFA CLOSING IN, SWEET 16 FOR DJOKOVIC

Nadal won three of the four majors in 2010 and added another two this year, further trimming Federer's advantage.

World number one Nadal only failed to win the French Open twice in the decade, while Djokovic was a six-time Australian Open champion and scooped a quintet of Wimbledon crowns.

Federer has been stuck on 20 grand slam triumphs since going back-to-back in Australia in 2018, with the most recent seven won by either Djokovic or Nadal.

Not since Wawrinka's success at Flushing Meadows in 2016 has a player other than Nadal, Djokovic or Federer won a men's grand slam singles title. 

 

SERENA WINS A DOZEN, BUT SHORT OF COURT

Williams confirmed her status as one of the all-time greats by winning a further 12 major singles titles since the turn of the decade.

The 38-year-old has remained on 23 since defeating her sister, Venus, when she was pregnant in the 2017 Australian Open final.

Williams has lost all four major finals since the birth of her daughter, Alexis Olympia, including the past two against Halep and Andreescu at Wimbledon and in New York respectively.

Angelique Kerber claimed three grand slams in the 2010s, while Kim Clijsters, Maria Sharapova, Li Na, Victoria Azarenka, Petra Kvitova, Halep, Garbine Muguruza and Osaka won two apiece.

 

ONUS ON NEXT GEN MEN TO STEP UP

While there had been concerns over what was to come with so many legends heading towards, or already in, the twilight of their careers, exciting talent has emerged in both the men

While there were concerns over what was to come with so many legends heading towards, or already in, the twilight of their careers, exciting talent has emerged in both the men's and women's game.  

Canadian teenager Andreescu capped a breakthrough season by winning the US Open, while world number one Barty is only 23 and the likes of Halep still have plenty of time on their side.

With Federer aged 38, Nadal 33, Djokovic 32 and Murray - hoping to work his way back up the rankings after recovering from hip surgery - also in his 30s, there will be a changing of the guard in the next decade.

Stefanos Tsitsipas gave another example of his huge potential by winning the ATP Finals title, while Dominic Thiem has been beaten by Nadal in the past two French Open finals.

Daniil Medvedev, Alexander Zverev, Felix Auger-Aliassime and Denis Shapovalov will also be hoping to come of age in the 2020s.

Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray were among the big winners as the recipients of the 2019 ATP Awards were announced on Thursday.

World number one Nadal was already certain to be the Player of the Year, having ended the season on top of the rankings.

But he also collected the Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship Award, voted for by his fellow players, for the second straight year.

Nadal won the French Open and US Open, beating Dominic Thiem and Daniil Medvedev respectively, to take his career tally to 19 majors.

There were no surprises as Murray was named the Comeback Player of the Year less than 12 months after he announced plans for retirement.

Murray was set to quit before undergoing hip resurfacing surgery, after which he starred on the doubles circuit, winning the Queen's Club Championships alongside Feliciano Lopez before playing with Serena Williams at Wimbledon.

The Briton then won the European Open in October, his first singles crown on the ATP Tour in 31 months.

Meanwhile, Jannik Sinner, the 18-year-old who ended the 2018 season ranked 763rd, was the Newcomer of the Year after his Next Gen ATP Finals success.

Fellow Italian Matteo Berrettini, who reached the US Open semi-finals and is now the world number eight, claimed the Most Improved Player of the Year honours.

Medvedev's stunning second half of the season did not go unnoticed, with coach Gilles Cervara the ATP Coach of the Year. The Russian played nine finals, winning four, in 2019.

Yet popular stars Roger Federer and Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan were not forgotten, collecting the Fans' Favourite awards.

Andy Murray opted not to take any risks with a "bit of an issue" after only playing once for Great Britain in their run to the Davis Cup semi-finals.

The former world number one recorded a three-set singles victory against Tallon Griekspoor of the Netherlands but did not feature again during the new-look tournament in Spain.

Murray instead cheered on his team-mates as they reached the last four in Madrid, where they lost to eventual champions Spain.

The Scotsman – who lifted his first title following hip surgery at the European Open in October – revealed a "mild" groin issue kept him off the court, though only after consultation with both medical staff and team captain Leon Smith.

"I had a bit of an issue with my groin, pelvis. I wanted to play but I wasn't allowed to risk it," he said, according to quotes in the Mirror.

"I took the final decision but I'm obviously speaking to my physio, doctor, speaking to Leon.

"I don't know exactly when I did it because I had a scan straight after the match with Tallon Griekspoor because my groin area was sore during the match.

"I had noticed it a little bit a couple of days in the build-up so I didn't know because after Antwerp I took 12 days off or something and didn't hit any balls, and then I slowly built up till I got over to Madrid and then started practising hard and I noticed it was a bit sore.

"It was more like a bony bruise. It’s mild. But that was something which if I had played on it, it could have got worse. And that's why it was difficult for me."

Murray was speaking prior to the premier of his Amazon Prime Video documentary - Andy Murray: Resurfacing - that charts his comeback from a career-threatening hip issue.

Spain will face Great Britain in the Davis Cup semi-finals but Serbia's hopes of glory in the tournament came to a tearful end in Madrid on Friday.

With world number one Rafael Nadal in sparkling form, host nation Spain fought back after losing the opening singles rubber to defeat 2016 champions Argentina in a late finish in the capital.

Their reward is a last-four clash against a Britain squad that progressed past Germany without the need to play doubles, Kyle Edmund and Dan Evans recording respective wins over Philipp Kohlschreiber and Jan-Lennard Struff.

Edmund prevailed in straight sets to reward the decision taken by captain Leon Smith to retain the same line-up that secured qualification for the knockout stage by beating Kazakhstan.

That meant Andy Murray once again sat out proceedings, the Scot instead taking up a supportive role from close to the court as he cheered his team-mates on.

Evans had lost his previous two matches but held his nerve in a deciding tie-break against Struff, with the 7-6 (8-6) 3-6 7-6 (7-2) result securing an unassailable 2-0 advantage.

They will have to find a way to cope with Nadal on Saturday, though, after the Spaniard dazzled on home soil, crushing Diego Schwartzman in just over an hour before combining with Marcel Granollers in the decisive doubles.

Nadal and Granollers got past Maximo Gonzalez and Leonardo Mayer 6-4 4-6 6-3.

In the other half of the draw, Russia came out on top in a tight, tense doubles contest to knock out Serbia.

Andrey Rublev and Karen Khachanov saved three match points before eventually overcoming Viktor Troicki and Novak Djokovic 6-4 4-6 7-6 (10-8), sparking wild celebrations.

However, while a jubilant Russia will look forward to facing Canada next, there was nothing but disappointment for a Serbia squad desperate for success to reward the retiring Janko Tipsarevic's service in the competition.

Troicki offered an apology in an emotional news conference, telling the media: "We had chances to finish it. We didn't do it. I messed up in the crucial moments."

Andy Murray will not feature for Great Britain in their Davis Cup quarter-final tie against Germany on Friday after Kyle Edmund was once again picked for singles action.

Murray was rested for the Group E victory over Kazakhstan on Thursday that secured Great Britain's place in the knockout stages of the new-look tournament in Spain. 

Captain Leon Smith admitted after the 2-1 win that he was unsure if the Scot - who had laboured to a three-set victory over Tallon Griekspoor of the Netherlands in his team's opening outing - would return to the line-up.

And Edmund, who played instead against Kazakhstan, recording an impressive victory over Mikhail Kukushkin, has retained his spot in the line-up.

His opponent in the opening match will be Philipp Kohlschreiber, with Dan Evans then going up against Jan-Lennard Struff.

If required, Jamie Murray and Neal Skupski will once again team up for the doubles. Kevin Krawietz and Andreas Mies are scheduled to be their opponents.

The winners of the tie will go up against either Argentina or hosts Spain - who also meet in Friday's second session in Madrid - in the last four.

In the other half of the draw, Russia knocked out Novak Djokovic's Serbia courtesy of a hard-fought doubles win, Andrey Rublev and Karen Khachanov saving three match points before eventually prevailing. Next up will be Canada, who qualified for the semi-finals on Thursday.

Great Britain captain Leon Smith has not yet decided whether Andy Murray will be involved in the Davis Cup quarter-finals.

Murray – who overcame Dutchman Tallon Griekspoor 6-7 (7-9) 6-4 7-6 (7-5) on Wednesday – was rested for Great Britain's 2-1 Group E victory over Kazakhstan on Thursday.

The tie was level at 1-1 heading into a decisive doubles rubber, with Neal Skupski and Murray's older brother Jamie coming out on top 6-1 6-4.

And Smith says former world number one Murray may not feature on Friday against Group C winners Germany.

"Andy is a team player and understands what is best for the team," Smith told reporters in Madrid.

"There is no awkwardness about who is going to play, who isn't going to play. It is a good, open and honest discussion. That's what we will do again.

"It might be one of the more difficult decisions I've had to make, but it is also better when you have got the quality we've got to be able to have those discussions.

"We can look at who is in the best physical condition, and look at the match-ups again, linking those factors together to do what is best for the team.

"Because we are scheduled tomorrow evening, it gives us time to see if everybody is right and how they feel."

Rafael Nadal ended Croatia's reign as Davis Cup champions and put Spain into the quarter-finals after history was made in Germany's clean sweep of Argentina on Wednesday.

Nadal sealed the hosts' passage into the last eight at La Caja Magica with a 6-4 6-3 victory over Borna Gojo, the world number one's 26th consecutive singles win in the competition.

That gave Spain a 2-0 lead and ensured Croatia could not finish above Russia in Group B due to Andrey Rublev's defeat of Roberto Bautista Agut on Tuesday.

Bautista Agut earlier made amends for that loss by easing to a 6-1 6-3 thrashing of Nikola Mektic in the opening rubber on day three.

Germany made a dream start in Madrid, beating Argentina 3-0 with Philipp Kohlschreiber seeing off Guido Pella 1-6 6-3 6-4 and Jan-Lennard Struff a 6-3 7-6 (10-8) victor over Diego Schwartzman.

Kevin Krawietz and Andreas Mies put the icing on the cake against Maximo Gonzalez and Leonardo Mayer by winning the longest Davis Cup tie-break – taking the final set 7-6 (20-18).

Germany are top of Group C and denied Argentina the chance to seal a spot in the quarter-finals. 

Andy Murray marked his first Davis Cup appearance in over three years with a hard-fought 6-7 (7-9) 6-4 7-6 (7-5) win over Tallon Griekspoor in Great Britain's 2-1 Group E success over Netherlands.

Novak Djokovic eased past Yoshihito Nishioka  6-1 6-2 in Serbia's 3-0 triumph over Japan, while Australia progressed after beating Belgium 2-1 and the United States edged Italy 2-1 in a clash between two nations already eliminated.

Andy Murray believes he is now back to being capable of taking on the world's elite players after his remarkable comeback from injury in 2019.

Murray looked set to retire due to injury earlier in the year, but after undergoing successful hip surgery, crowned his return by winning the European Open in Antwerp to claim his 46th ATP Tour title.

After taking the best part of a month off, Murray will now head to the Davis Cup finals as part of Great Britain's five-man team.

The 32-year-old intends step things up further in 2020 and the three-time major winner says he would be confident of pushing Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic or Roger Federer all the way should he come up against any of the big three.

"I know if I played against the top players tomorrow there would be a very small chance of me winning that match," Murray told BBC Sport.

"But I do feel I could win. That's one of the performance goals I want - when I go out on court against all of the players I want to feel like I have a chance of winning.

"Seven or eight weeks ago I wouldn't have felt that was the case. 

"If I continued along that path then I wouldn't continue playing. It has been an up and down few years but I feel like I'm coming through the other side of it and I'm excited to see what I can do over the next couple of years.

"It's difficult to say exactly where I am. I'm not where I was when I was 25 but I don't expect to be and I don't need to be [in order] to be competitive at the highest level and that's why I'm excited.

"I'm not going to set a target of top 10 or trying to make the semis of a Grand Slam because I've done all of that before and I don't need that.

"I'm happy just being pain free, healthy and love what I'm doing."

Murray defeated Stan Wawrinka to clinch the European Open title, while the Scot overcame world number eight Matteo Berrettini on his way to the China Open quarter-finals in Beijing, where he was eventually defeated by Dominic Thiem.

Andy Murray feels grand slam events could give him the best chance of success now he has made his comeback from injury.

The three-time major winner marked his return from career-saving hip surgery by winning his 46th ATP Tour title at the European Open last month.

That emotional triumph and the way his body has been reacted to regular matches has given Murray confidence he can be competitive at the highest level.

While he has already won a regular ATP Tour event, Murray feels the slams could work in his favour even more in 2020 because of the extra recovery time they provide in between matches.

"Your body gets a chance to rest up before the next match," Murray told reporters at a Castore sponsorship event. 

"Sometimes in Antwerp where you're playing back-to-back days there was no chance to do that. 

"My physio has always been more positive about me playing grand slams than playing a tournament when you play five days in a row.

"He loves the fact that there's a day off to rest and actually recover.

"I guess I'll see how it responds when I'm over there [at the Australian Open]."

At this stage, the prospect of playing longer matches at majors is not a major concern for Murray, who also discussed his plans to have a flexible schedule going forward.

The Briton added: "I'm not worried from the hip's perspective as I've had zero issues with it so far so I don't anticipate that playing an extra 45 minutes or an hour will be bad for my hip. 

"How the rest of my body how that responds, I'll see when I'm out there.

"I think my body showed I'm going to be able to play at a high level. That's where I need to be smart with my scheduling and the amount of tournaments that I play, to be more reactive than in the past.

"Let's say I plan to play three tournaments in the first couple of months of the year but I only win one match in each of those tournaments, then I could add another. But if I end up doing really well, maybe I play a tournament less. In the past I wouldn't have done that."

While Murray, who is preparing to fly to Madrid for next week's Davis Cup finals, is optimistic about competing at the top, that is no longer his most important consideration.

Asked where he would like to be in 12 months, the 32-year-old added: "I would want to be healthy.

"It's nice to be able to win big competitions and have a high ranking and stuff. That's great but actually the reason why I'm playing is because I love it. I need to remember that and being healthy allows me to do that.

"So if I'm 30 in the world or 70 in the world and I'm still enjoying it and I feel competitive then that would be success for me. You realise what really is important." 

Kyle Edmund has been named as the fifth and final player in Great Britain's line up for the Davis Cup finals.

Having endured a poor run of form, losing eight matches on the bounce, former British number one Edmund rallied with successive victories at the Paris Masters earlier this week.

He eventually fell to world number one Novak Djokovic in the round of 16, but his displays against Ricardas Berankis and Diego Schwartzman were enough to cement his place in Leon Smith's squad for the new-look event later this month.

Andy Murray had already been named in Great Britain's team after his triumph at the European Open, alongside his brother Jamie, Neal Skupski and Dan Evans.

"I'm delighted to name Kyle as the final nominated player to our Davis Cup team," Great Britain captain Smith said of Edmund, who saw off competition from Cameron Norrie.

"While Kyle has had a tough few months, he showed at the Paris Masters what level of tennis he is capable of producing.

"It's been a difficult decision to make as Cam Norrie has had a very good year on tour and is finishing the year ranked around number 50 in the world.

"It's a strong position for our team to be in when we have such high-quality players vying for selection."

Novak Djokovic is hopeful former world number one Andy Murray can return to being a contender for the top prizes in 2020.

Murray looked set to retire after his elimination from the Australian Open but has instead staged an incredible comeback from hip surgery over the course of the season.

His remarkable return reached new heights with the defeat of Stan Wawrinka in the European Open final this month, earning him a first ATP Tour trophy in over two years.

Djokovic enjoyed an impressive record against Murray, who has won only 11 of their 36 meetings.

The current world number one, who will lose his status to Rafael Nadal at the start of November regardless of their respective displays at the Paris Masters, is now looking forward to Murray continuing his resurgence next year.

"I sincerely hope so," Djokovic told a news conference at the ATP Masters event, when asked if world number 128 Murray could rediscover the form that took him to three grand slam titles.

"I hope that he can be in contention for the top spot because tennis would profit from that and benefit. Because we know how big of a legacy he left behind and he is still creating for himself.

"Knowing what he has been through in the last three years, it was really nice to see him win a title after a long time. Only he knows the adversities that he had to face physically but also mentally.

"I know the discipline and the ethics that he has and how hardworking he is, so he definitely deserves it. And I would definitely wish him all the best."

While Nadal will replace Djokovic as number one in the rankings on November 4, the Serbian can still end the year in top spot, though it will likely require him to win all his matches in Paris and at the ATP Finals in London.

"I'm not thinking about it in that way. But I am in the race for number one with Rafa. He's in a much better position, but I hope I can do well in this tournament," Djokovic, who will face Dusan Lajovic or Corentin Moutet in his first match in Paris.

"I've historically played really well indoors in Paris and also London, but it doesn't depend on me.

"So I cannot really focus too much on what he is doing or other players. I'll try to kind of get the most out of my performances and see where it takes me.

"In order to have a chance for year-end number one, I have to win all of my matches until the end of the season. But also it depends on [Nadal], how he does."

Andy Murray will make his first Davis Cup appearance since 2016 when he represents Great Britain at the finals in Madrid in November.

Great Britain captain Leon Smith has named Murray alongside Dan Evans, plus doubles pair Jamie Murray - Andy's younger brother - and Neal Skupski, with a fifth member yet to be decided.

After looking set to retire at the start of 2019, Murray has come back in extraordinary fashion, capping off his return to the ATP Tour with an incredible triumph in the European Open on Sunday.

The 32-year-old had previously stated his intent to play in the finals, which have been revamped for this season, with 18 teams competing in six groups.

"We are in a good position with improved strength and depth in our team and will be naming the fifth player in the next couple of weeks," Smith said.

"It's been absolutely fantastic to see Andy back competing again, headlined by his incredible win in Antwerp."

Kyle Edmund, who has lost his past seven tour matches, has not been included, though is likely to be competing with Cameron Norrie for the final spot on Smith's team.

Davis Cup winners in 2015, Great Britain were given a wildcard for the event and will face the Netherlands and Kazakhstan in the group stage.

Rafael Nadal, who will become world number one once more in November, will lead Spain's side, with Novak Djokovic in action for Serbia, while in-form Daniil Medvedev headline's Russia's side.

Roger Federer will not be participating, with Switzerland failing to qualify.

Andy Murray's tears of despair in Melbourne were swapped for tears of joy in Antwerp after a heart-warming triumph at the European Open.

The three-time grand slam winner overcame Stan Wawrinka in three topsy-turvy sets to win a first ATP Tour title since 2017.

It marks an incredible turnaround for Murray, who at a news conference previewing the Australian Open in January spoke of his fears that his career was coming to an end due to a long-term hip injury, for which he underwent resurfacing surgery after the opening slam of 2019.

Just nine months later and Murray is a singles champion again on the ATP Tour. Here, we look back at an emotional 2019 for the popular Briton.

 

TEARS IN MELBOURNE

Murray broke down in tears when briefing the press ahead of the Australian Open in January after struggling to recover from hip surgery.

"I'm not sure I'm able to play through the pain for another four or five months. I want to get to Wimbledon and stop but I'm not certain I can do that," Murray said ahead of a valiant five-set first-round loss to Roberto Bautista-Agut.

Later that month, Murray underwent hip resurfacing surgery.

PAIN FREE AND ARISE SIR ANDY

Six weeks later, Murray sat down with BBC Sport for an interview in which he said he was "pain free" following the procedure, though admitted his chances of playing at Wimbledon were slim.

In May, Murray received the honour of a knighthood at a ceremony at Buckingham Palace, saying: "It's a nice day to spend with my family – my wife and parents are here."

HOWDY, PARTNERS! QUEEN'S GLORY 'DELICIANO'

Murray fans were delighted in June when it was announced he would play doubles with Feliciano Lopez – a player once dubbed 'Deliciano' by his mother Judy Murray.

Incredibly, the duo defeated Joe Salisbury and Rajeev Ram to clinch the title.

SERENA DREAM TEAM AT WIMBLEDON

Murray made headlines without even striking a ball when it was announced he would pair up with Serena Williams for a star-studded mixed-doubles pairing at Wimbledon.

It was a partnership that ended in round three, while Murray and Pierre-Hugues Herbert were knocked out in round two of the men's doubles.

Murray later teamed up with brother Jamie and again with Lopez to build up his match fitness, before another huge announcement followed.

GOING SOLO IN CINCINNATI

It was a moment he feared might not happen, but in August Murray was back playing singles at the Cincinnati Masters.

A first-round defeat to Richard Gasquet followed but Murray continued to add match minutes and claimed a notable victory over Matteo Berrettini at the China Open, before losing an ill-tempered second-round clash to Fabio Fognini at the Shanghai Masters.

ANDY AWESOME IN ANTWERP

After defeating Kimmer Coppejans and Pablo Cuevas in straight sets at the European Open, Murray needed to dip deep to go the distance in victories over Marius Copil and Ugo Humbert.

The fact Murray had made the final of an ATP Tour tournament was a huge achievement in itself and, after dropping the first set to Wawrinka, it looked a tall order to go a step further.

But in a back-and-forth encounter, Murray triumphed 3-6 6-4 6-4 before breaking down in tears courtside.

"It's amazing to be back playing against him in a final like that. I think it was a great match. I didn't expect to be in this position at all, so I'm very happy," he said.

Andy Murray surpassed his own expectations after claiming a memorable come-from-behind victory over Stan Wawrinka in the final of the European Open.

In January, an emotional Murray stated during a press briefing at the Australian Open that he thought his career might be over due to a long-term hip injury.

The Briton underwent resurfacing surgery but made a return to court in doubles competition at Queen's in June before making a singles comeback in Cincinnati in August.

Just two months on, the tears of despair in Melbourne were replaced by tears of joy as Murray earned a first ATP title win since 2017 after defeating Wawrinka 3-6 6-4 6-4 in Antwerp.

"It means a lot. The past few years have been extremely difficult. Both me and Stan have had a lot of injury problems in the past couple of years," Murray said on court. 

"It's amazing to be back playing against him in a final like that. I think it was a great match. I didn't expect to be in this position at all, so I'm very happy."

Wawrinka himself was searching for a first Tour title since two surgeries on his left knee in August 2017 and Murray paid tribute to his defeated opponent.

"Stan is a brilliant player. He's won many, many big tournaments. He always plays extremely well in the big matches," Murray said. 

"We know each other's games well. We played many tough matches in the past. I expected another one and that was what I got."

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