Gennaro Gattuso warned Juventus head coach Andrea Pirlo that his illustrious playing career will count for little in his new job.

Pirlo, who has not had a coaching job and only took over as Juve's Under-23s boss last week, was handed the reins in Turin on Saturday in the wake of Maurizio Sarri's dismissal.

The former midfielder – who won four Serie A titles, one Coppa Italia and two Supercoppa Italiana during a four-year spell with Juve – has signed a two-year deal.

However, Gattuso, who played alongside Pirlo at Milan and for Italy, provided an honest assessment of the job's difficulties for his former team-mate.

"Well he's screwed now… That's the job," Gattuso told Sky Italia following Napoli's defeat to Barcelona in the Champions League.

"He's lucky to be starting at Juventus, but this profession is one where a great playing career is not enough.

"You have to study, to work hard, and you don't get much sleep."

Gattuso's first job in coaching came at FC Sion, with the 42-year-old then having spells at Palermo, OFI Crete and Pisa before he took charge of Milan's youth team in 2017.

He was promoted to first-team head coach following Vincenzo Montella's sacking later that year, though he was dismissed at the end of the 2018-19 campaign after a fifth-placed finish, going on to replace Carlo Ancelotti at Napoli, who he guided to the Coppa Italia title this term.

"Being a player and being a coach is really not the same thing at all," Gattuso added.

"It's a totally different profession and we can't learn it just from books, we need to get in there and work hard. It's a different world."

Juventus have appointed Andrea Pirlo as their new head coach on a two-year deal.

The former Italy midfielder took charge as the Under-23s boss at his old club just nine days ago but has now been named as Maurizio Sarri's successor.

Sarri was sacked on Saturday after Juve were knocked out of the Champions League on away goals at the last-16 stage following a 2-2 aggregate draw with Lyon.

Ex-Juve player and current Real Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane emerged as one of the initial favourites for the role, along with ex-Tottenham boss Mauricio Pochettino and Lazio coach Simone Inzaghi.

There was also speculation Italy boss Roberto Mancini could be offered the post, but the club has promoted Pirlo instead.

"From today he will be the coach for Juventus, as the club has decided to entrust him with the technical leadership of the first team, after having already selected him for Juventus Under-23s," a statement read.

"Today's choice is based on the belief that Pirlo has what it takes to lead from his debut on the bench, an expert and talented squad to pursue new successes."

Pirlo left Juve in 2015 after the Bianconeri, who had been chasing the treble, were beaten 3-1 in the Champions League final by Barcelona.

He spent two years in MLS with New York City before calling time on his playing career.

The 2006 World Cup winner is a six-time Serie A champion, having won two with Milan and four with Juve. He won two Champions Leagues as a Rossoneri player, in 2003 and 2007.

Juventus are confident Andrea Pirlo is "destined for greatness" and a natural fit for the club, says chief football officer Fabio Paratici.

Juve dismissed Maurizio Sarri on Saturday in the wake of their Champions League exit at the hands of Lyon on Friday.

Sarri spent just one season at the club, winning the Serie A title but failing in the Coppa Italia and Champions League and his replacement was surprisingly announced just hours later.

Pirlo, who rejoined Juve as the Under-23s coach last week, has signed a two-year deal.

However, despite the job being Pirlo's first in senior coaching, Paratici – whose future is also reportedly in doubt – has full faith in the former midfielder.

"The decision for Pirlo was very natural, in the Juventus style, because he is someone who played with us, has always been in contact with everyone here and it felt natural," Paratici told Sky Sport Italia.

"We also believe he is destined for greatness. He was as a player and we think with confidence he can do the same as a coach."

Paratici reiterated Juve's decision to relieve Sarri of his duties was based on the entire 2019-20 campaign, not just the Champions League exit.

"We had already said, one game does not decide the future of a coach. Our evaluations were based on the whole season and not just a single match," Paratici added.

"A season is long, there are many moments and situations that then add up. There wasn't any spark.

"We simply came to this consideration at the end of a very long season, even after winning the Scudetto. It's not just Europe that decides on success or failure. 

"We are in unexplored territory, because nobody has won nine consecutive Serie A titles before. We achieved it with several eras, really, because they tend to last three to four years. We are at our third era in a row of success, it's almost inexplicable."

Juventus' elimination from the Champions League spelled the end for Maurizio Sarri and the start of a new era under Andrea Pirlo.

Despite leading the Bianconeri to a ninth straight Scudetto in 2019-20, Sarri was fired after Juve crashed out of the Champions League at the last-16 stage to Lyon on Friday.

Pirlo was at the heart of Juve's brilliant midfield during the start of their Serie A dominance, winning four Scudetti, the Coppa Italia and the Supercoppa Italiana twice during a four-year stint that ended when he moved to New York City in 2015.

A week after returning to Juve as their Under-23 boss, Pirlo was handed the reins of the first team ahead of the 2020-21 campaign.

He is not the first club legend to go back and manage a team they played for, though, and we have taken a look at the biggest successes and failures.

HITS

Pep Guardiola

After leaving Barcelona as a player in 2001, Guardiola returned as the Barca B boss in 2007 before being promoted to head coach of the first team a year later. Over four years in charge at Camp Nou he led the Blaugrana to 14 trophies, including three LaLiga titles and two Champions League crowns. Success has continued to come Guardiola's way with Bayern Munich and Manchester City.

Zinedine Zidane

World Cup winner Zidane was part of Real Madrid's 'Galacticos' in the early 2000s and he finished his playing career at the Santiago Bernabeu. Like Guardiola, he returned to oversee the second team before stepping up to the top job after the departure of Rafael Benitez in January 2016. Zidane went on to win an unprecedented three successive Champions League titles with Madrid before stepping away in May 2018, only to return 10 months later. He has already won LaLiga and the Supercopa de Espana in his second stint.

Antonio Conte

In 13 seasons as a player for Juventus, Conte won almost everything there is to win – five league titles, the Coppa Italia, the Champions League and the UEFA Cup. He moved into management two years after retiring and worked his way back to Juve after spells with Arezzo, Bari, Atalanta and Siena. Juve won three straight Scudetti under Conte – the start of their ongoing dominance – before he accepted the Italy job in 2014. Pirlo will have to get the better of his former coach Conte, now at Inter, if he is to maintain the Bianconeri's run of titles.

Roberto Di Matteo

Di Matteo accepted the top job at Chelsea in 2012, having previously been assistant to Andre Villas-Boas. Di Matteo – who won the FA Cup twice with the Blues as a player – went on to lift two trophies as Chelsea boss, including their first Champions League title with a penalty shoot-out win over Bayern Munich, but he was discarded early in the following season.

MISSES

Alan Shearer

Record Premier League goalscorer, Newcastle United legend and lethal England striker – Shearer's playing career was full of success. When he retired in 2006, Shearer moved into television as a pundit, but when the Magpies came calling in 2009 he stepped in to try and save them from relegation. Sadly for Shearer he was unsuccessful, his eight-game reign ending in Newcastle slipping out of the top flight after a 1-0 defeat to Aston Villa on the final day.

Filippo Inzaghi

Employing former players as head coaches had previously worked well for Milan – Fabio Capello and Carlo Ancelotti proving particularly successful. When the Rossoneri turned to Inzaghi in 2014 after Clarence Seedorf's brief tenure, the move was therefore no surprise. However, the former striker – who won eight major trophies at the club in his playing days – flopped, winning just 14 of his 40 matches in charge as Milan finished 10th, their worst league position in 17 years.

Thierry Henry

Henry made his name at Monaco after breaking into the first team in 1994, the forward going on to become a world champion and a Premier League icon with Arsenal. After a period as youth coach with the Gunners, Henry was named as Belgium boss Roberto Martinez's assistant. Permanent roles with Bordeaux and Aston Villa were mooted, but in October 2018 Henry chose Monaco. He lasted just three months, losing 11 of his 20 matches in charge across all competitions before being replaced by Leonardo Jardim, the man he had succeeded.

Juan Jose Lopez

One of the most decorated players in River Plate history, having won seven league titles in an 11-year spell, Lopez was a popular appointment after making a strong impact in his second period as caretaker manager in 2010. However, he subsequently presided over a poor 2011 Clausura campaign, forcing River into a play-off against Belgrano, who won 3-1 on aggregate. It was the first time River dropped out of the top tier, sparking riots which left many people injured.

Juventus have appointed Andrea Pirlo as their new head coach on a two-year deal.

The former Italy midfielder took charge as the Under-23s boss at his old club just nine days ago but has now been named as Maurizio Sarri's successor.

Sarri was sacked on Saturday after Juve were knocked out of the Champions League on away goals at the last-16 stage following a 2-2 aggregate draw with Lyon.

Ex-Juve player and current Real Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane emerged as one of the initial favourites for the role, along with ex-Tottenham boss Mauricio Pochettino and Lazio coach Simone Inzaghi.

There was also speculation Italy boss Roberto Mancini could be offered the post, but the club has promoted Pirlo instead.

"From today he will be the coach for Juventus, as the club has decided to entrust him with the technical leadership of the first team, after having already selected him for Juventus Under-23s," a statement read.

"Today's choice is based on the belief that Pirlo has what it takes to lead from his debut on the bench, an expert and talented squad to pursue new successes."

Pirlo left Juve in 2015 after the Bianconeri, who had been chasing the treble, were beaten 3-1 in the Champions League final by Barcelona.

He spent two years in MLS with New York City before calling time on his playing career.

The 2006 World Cup winner is a six-time Serie A champion, having won two with Milan and four with Juve. He won two Champions Leagues as a Rossoneri player, in 2003 and 2007.

Cristiano Ronaldo spoke of the importance of making "the best decisions for the future" in the wake of Juventus' Champions League exit and the sacking of Maurizio Sarri.

Ronaldo scored twice on Friday to give Juve a 2-1 win over Lyon in Turin, but it was not enough to prevent them going out at the last-16 stage on away goals after a 2-2 aggregate draw.

On Saturday, the Bianconeri announced they had sacked head coach Sarri barely a year after he was appointed following his departure from Chelsea.

Sarri guided Juve to a ninth Serie A title in a row, but defeat to Napoli in the Coppa Italia final and a failure to instil his playing style on the squad had led to doubts about his suitability to the job.

Andrea Pirlo, who was only appointed coach of the Juventus under-23 team last month, soon emerged as favourite to take charge at the Allianz Stadium.

Ronaldo urged everyone at Juve to use the short off-season for "critical thinking" so that they can return to satisfy fans' expectations.

While he did not mention Sarri or the speculation around the coach's possible replacement, the Portugal star made it clear the club now need to get things right.

"The 2019-20 season is over for us, much later than usual but yet sooner than we expected," Ronaldo wrote on Instagram.

"Now it's time for reflection, time to analyse the ups and downs because critical thinking is the only way to improve.

"A huge club such as Juventus must always think like the best in the world, work like the best in the world, so that we can call ourselves one of the best and biggest clubs in the world.

"Winning the Serie A once again in such a difficult year is something that we are very proud of. Personally, scoring 37 goals for Juventus and 11 for the Portuguese national team is something that makes me face the future with renewed ambition and desire to keep doing better and better each year.

"But the fans demand more from us. They expect more from us. And we have to deliver, we must live up to the highest expectations.

"May this short vacation break allow us all to make the best decisions for the future and come back stronger and more committed than ever. See you soon!"

Zinedine Zidane, Ronaldo's former coach at Real Madrid, was fancied by some as a potential candidate to succeed Sarri.

Italy boss Roberto Mancini, ex-Tottenham man Mauricio Pochettino and Lazio coach Simone Inzaghi were linked with the job in the immediate aftermath of Sarri's departure.

Andrea Pirlo has returned to Juventus to take over as the coach of their under-23s side, the Serie A champions have announced.

Pirlo spent four years at Juve between 2011 and 2015, helping the Bianconeri to four Serie A titles, one Coppa Italia triumph and two Supercoppa Italiana victories.

The playmaker left for MLS side New York City, spending three seasons at the club before retiring in 2017.

Now, Pirlo has taken his first step into coaching, returning to Juve to take over their U23s.

Juve's U23s finished 10th in Italy's third tier last season, while winning the Coppa Italia Serie C.

Sandro Tonali is reportedly on Juventus' and Inter's radar and Brescia coach Diego Lopez believes the in-demand midfielder has "no limits".

Tonali, who played a key role in Brescia's promotion from Serie B last season, has again starred for the club despite their position at the bottom of Serie A.

Nine points adrift of safety when the coronavirus pandemic brought the season to a halt back in March, Brescia look doomed to an immediate return to the second tier.

However, Tonali appears likely to remain in the top flight with one of the league's elite and is said to prefer Inter over Juve.

Asked about the 20-year by Corriere della Sera, Lopez said: "There's a lot of talk about him, and rightly so, but he's just a young lad who is in love with the ball.

"I can't give him advice on what to do off the pitch. As a player, I'd say he can still improve.

"He has it all, but he can get even better. He has no limits.

"I really like him in front of the defence. I see him versatile like [Radja] Nainggolan in the middle of the field."

Tonali has drawn comparisons to legendary Italy midfielder Andrea Pirlo, who also began his career at Brescia.

Pirlo recently described Tonali as a "more complete player" than he was, much to the astonishment of the Azzurri international, who has already won three caps for his country.

"Let's say that Pirlo gave the right answer," Tonali told Sportweek. "We don't play like each other. But to say that I'm a more complete player than he was…

"When two of my friends sent me the Instagram live in which he said that, I stayed still. And I'm still speechless now. All I can say to him is, thank you.

"I'd rather say what I'd like to learn from him. The long pass from deep, accurate to within a millimetre. I'm better at short passes today. Which, to tell you the truth, comes even more natural to me than the long pass.

"I know that with the right sacrifices, I can reach the top of the world. I haven't achieved half of what I have in mind, but I feel good enough to make it."

Andrea Pirlo played down talk Sandro Tonali was similar to him, saying the Brescia midfielder was "much more complete".

Tonali has been linked with Serie A giants Juventus and Inter after starring for Brescia, while he made his Italy debut last year.

The 20-year-old has drawn comparisons to Italy great Pirlo, but the former Juventus and Milan star believes Tonali could be even better.

"It is said that he may be my heir, but I don't see many things in common," he told Nicolo De Devitiis during an Instagram Live chat on Monday.

"He is another type of player. He is much more complete both in the defensive phase and when he sets up. He is a mix between my characteristics and those of other players.

"He is the most promising of midfielders. He will surely become a great player."

Tonali's future has been a talking point with the Serie A season suspended since March due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Pirlo hopes the campaign can be completed, with Juve having held a one-point lead over Lazio when it was paused.

"Health comes first, then if you can finish the championship then all the better," he said.

"It won't be an easy choice. We hope it will happen. Football makes many people work, maximum safety must be guaranteed.

"If one person is infected, everything must be blocked again."

There have been more than 286,000 deaths from coronavirus worldwide, with the death toll in Italy exceeding 30,700.

Francesco Totti backed Sandro Tonali to become one of the world's best midfielders similar to Steven Gerrard, Frank Lampard or Daniele De Rossi.

Brescia midfielder Tonali, 19, is linked with some of Europe's biggest clubs, having made his Italy debut late last year.

Barcelona, Juventus, Inter and Milan are reportedly interested in the midfielder, who has been compared to Italy great Andrea Pirlo.

Totti, an Italy and Roma great, believes Tonali will develop into one of the world's best.

"He will become one of the strongest central midfielders in the world, like Gerrard, De Rossi or Lampard," he told TV presenter Paolo Bonolis during an Instagram Live chat on Thursday.

"He's a mix between Pirlo and [Gennaro] Gattuso too. He has everything a player can have.

"He has an incredible change of pace, he's technically good and he's always calm, both in important games and in easy games."

Paul Pogba says the "unbelievable" experience of learning from Paul Scholes and Andrea Pirlo helped him to become a top-class midfielder.

The France star made his Premier League debut for Manchester United in 2012 alongside Scholes at the heart of midfield, the year in which he left for Juve on a free transfer.

Winning three consecutive Serie A titles alongside Pirlo in Turin was a further positive experience for Pogba before he returned to Old Trafford in 2016.

The 27-year-old says playing and training with such cultured midfielders helped him to develop after he spent part of his youth career as a centre-forward.

"You learn a lot and you look at them," Pogba told the UTD Podcast. "I really learned and have been learning. It was unbelievable for me, seeing them training like that, and it pushed me.

"Okay, I have to work hard and have a lot more to do. Pirlo and Scholes, those are midfielders who control the game, the players to look at, and I learned from them, a lot.

"I started as a striker and then a number 10 and then a number six. Thank God, I didn't go to centre-back! It was because I wanted to touch the ball too much.

"I was the striker and dropping too much, so one coach told me: 'Okay, play the number 10 and touch the ball more.' I still loved the ball too much and had too many touches, so he put me at number six."

Pogba had been close to returning to first-team action when the English season was suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic.

He has made only eight appearances for United in 2019-20 because of foot and ankle injury problems.

'Next Generation' is a series focusing on the young players tipped to establish themselves as the elite in the 2020s. 

It was in the modest surroundings of Avellino's Stadio Partenio-Adriano Lombardi that the next great hope of Italian football was introduced to professional football in August 2017.

The 17-year-old Sandro Tonali emerged as a second-half substitute for Brescia, coming into the side to help shore up the midfield a few minutes after Emanuele Ndoj was sent off.

Brescia were 1-0 up when he came on in the 70th minute. They went on to lose 2-1 – a "half disaster", he called it.

Tonali wasn't seen again in Brescia's first team until January, but since then he has barely been out of the side and established himself as one of Europe's most talked-about teenagers.

Now an Italy international – having first been called up before even playing in Serie A – Tonali looks destined to move on this year, with Brescia facing relegation back to Serie B.

After the coronavirus pandemic passes, 2020 could be the year that makes or breaks this silky midfielder's chances of reaching the top.

"A 50-year-old's brain"

Many young players can be very eager to accelerate their careers too quickly. That big leap to an elite club is sometimes taken too soon and the consequences can have ramifications for the rest of the player's career.

Tonali was a regular in the Brescia team at 17. After missing out on promotion in that first season, he stayed and enjoyed a full campaign of first team football in Serie B, establishing himself and developing as the team won promotion.

Again, the urge to join a bigger club might have proven too great for many, but Tonali stayed put and will have a season of top-level football under his belt by the time 2020-21 rolls around. It's unlikely he'll move down a division again, so, finally, it may well be the right time to take the next step.

Maturity. This is a label many have attached to Tonali, and that attitude is visible on the pitch as well, possessing great awareness and composure – you will rarely see petulance.

"The impressive thing, which I have not seen in other children, was his way of acting as an adult: very serious, taciturn, introverted," a former teacher of his once told Sky Italia.

Roberto Boscaglia, the coach who gave Tonali his debut, had a similar appraisal of the teenager in 2018, telling Radio Lo Sport: "He was a boy with a personality and a strength in fearful legs, and above all with a brain of a 50-year-old in the body of an 18-year-old."

The 'next Pirlo'?

"Blame the hair, I should cut it," Tonali said to Gazzetta dello Sport last year when asked about the comparisons to Andrea Pirlo that have become synonymous with him. "Andrea is unreachable. Like [Steven] Gerrard, the most dynamic, or [Luka] Modric, unique in style. I see myself in [Gennaro] Gattuso."

Long-locked, blessed with wonderful technique, a central midfielder and schooled at Brescia – it's easy to see how the Pirlo comparisons started.

But he is seemingly wise to distance himself from such comments. After all, that tag has rarely helped any of the midfielders it was previously reserved for, whether that's Luca Cigarini, Andrea Poli or Manuel Locatelli.

While the comparison is obvious in theory, it's clear how Tonali differs from Pirlo, who was an out-and-out playmaker and conducted almost everything his teams did.

Perhaps that's where his career will end up, but at the moment Tonali is no Pirlo, despite what the romanticists want.

Pirlo v Tonali

While it's obviously important to remember Tonali's data is collected over a much shorter period, at the same time it helps highlight just how good Pirlo was.

He was an era-defining playmaker and dictated matches unlike almost any other player on the planet during his career – perhaps bar Xavi.

Between the start of 2004-05 – when Opta records began – and when he left Juventus in 2015, Pirlo had 94 touches and 75 passes per Serie A match on average. This season, Tonali is averaging 60 touches and 39 passes.

The teams Pirlo played in generally dominated possession, whereas Brescia cannot do that – Tonali is generally tasked with aiding his side in transitions and with more direct passes, springing counters.

This potentially explains why his pass accuracy in his own half is 82 per cent and in the opposing half it is 68. By comparison, Pirlo's respective figures are 95 per cent and 82 per cent, significantly better than Tonali's.

Pirlo's accuracy with passes ending in the final third (74 per cent) is also much higher than his potential heir (64 per cent).

But don't let such facts trick you into suggesting Pirlo's excellent passing accuracy means he just played the ball simply all the time – he averaged 2.3 chances created per match in the qualifying time period, showing he dictated and crafted. Putting that into context, Tonali is averaging 2.1 every game this season, his total 48 chances created being the ninth highest in Serie A.

Where Tonali does come out on top, however, is dribbling. He has remarkable ability with the ball at his feet, beating his man with 76 per cent success this term. Only Ismael Bennacer (81 per cent) has a better completion rate of players with more than 35 attempts – Pirlo's average was 62 per cent.

There's no doubt Tonali is a fine prospect and still very young, but the data supports those who insist he's a significantly different player to Pirlo at the moment. A move to a better team, where he will be supported by higher-quality players, could elevate Tonali to another level, and maybe he'll adapt to a more orchestrative role. But to suggest he will and also reach Pirlo's level would be widely speculative at this point.

Antonio Conte is reluctant to compare Marcelo Brozovic to Italy great Andrea Pirlo but believes the Inter midfielder has world-class potential.

Brozovic has been an ever-present during Conte's Inter reign to date, scoring twice in eight Serie A appearances.

The Croatia international's playmaking skills were again to the fore during impressive wins over Sassuolo and Borussia Dortmund over the past week.

It meant Conte fielding a question at his pre-match news conference for Saturday's meeting with Parma that mentioned the 26-year-old alongside the magisterial Pirlo – a comparison the former Juventus head coach was keen to defuse.

"Brozo can get better. He can get better with his passes to the attack, he can set up more goals," he said.

"We are working on this. I think he needs to also work on his defensive game. A holding midfielder must be good in defence too. He can become world class.

"As for Pirlo, I do not want to make a comparison with Brozo. Pirlo is someone who is a genius. He made history in this game.

"Brozo has different traits, he is training well and I am pleased with him. I want him to become a world-class player."

Back-to-back wins on the resumption from the latest international break have seen Inter bounce back impressively from the reverses to Barcelona and Juve at the start of this month.

That absorbing loss to Maurizio Sarri's reigning champions at San Siro remains the difference in the Serie A table, with Inter a point shy of Juventus thanks to seven wins from eight matches.

"We have started on our journey, we need to focus on ourselves," Conte replied when asked whether Inter's unexpectedly close proximity to Juventus was bringing extra pressure.

"Inter cannot worry about the others, we need to look ahead.

"This is a new cycle for us. It is not easy. We are close to the league leaders. That is very satisfying, but let's stay focused.

"Each game is a test of our ambitions. We need to give our all. That is the only way to get three points."

Conte added: "We have started a new journey together. These things take time and patience.

"We are on the right track, let us continue this way. Then we will see where we are at the end of the season.

"As I have said, we always need to give 100 per cent. I want us to have no regrets come the final whistle."

Sandro Tonali said he is a mix of Andrea Pirlo and Gennaro Gattuso as he compared himself to the Italy greats following his international debut.

Tonali came off the bench to make his Italy bow in the country's 5-0 rout of Liechtenstein in Euro 2020 qualifying on Tuesday.

The 19-year-old Brescia sensation – who has been linked to Serie A champions Juventus, Manchester United and Fiorentina – addressed comparisons post-match.

"It's tough to pick one of those champions," Tonali told Rai Sport after being compared to Pirlo, Gattuso and Daniele De Rossi.

"Maybe a mix of all of them would be perfect. I guess there are similarities with Pirlo in a way but I also add a lot of a grit in there, so maybe more Gattuso."

Italy matched a national team record as they extended their winning streak to nine games, having booked their place at Euro 2020 with a win over Greece at the weekend.

Roberto Mancini named a young starting team for the clash at Rheinpark Stadion as Federico Bernardeschi, Andrea Belotti, Alessio Romagnoli and Stephan El Shaarawy all got on the scoresheet in Vaduz.

There was also time for Tonali to make his debut with 16 minutes remaining and he reflected on the emotion he felt when replacing Bernardeschi.

"I felt wonderful as not everyone gets to play for the national team. I was a little emotional for 30 seconds that it was really happening," Tonali added.

"The coach told us all to be ready to play so I had an idea. Everyone in the squad was very helpful to the newcomers like me and it felt easy to come in.

"The system is different, so is the timing and there is obviously a lot more quality in the Italy side, but the role and position remain the same."

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