Defending champion Juan Ignacio Londero and Albert Ramos-Vinolas advanced to the Cordoba Open round of 16 on Tuesday.

Cordoba was the scene of Londero's breakthrough ATP Tour title last year, the Argentinian capping a fairytale week by overcoming countryman Guido Pella in three sets.

Back on the red clay following a first-round loss at the Australian Open in January, eighth seed Londero defeated Italy's Marco Cecchinato 6-2 7-5.

Londero – playing the night session – did not face a break point and won 70 per cent of his first serves, much to the delight of the home crowd at the ATP 250 tournament.

Next up for Londero is fellow Argentine player Pedro Cachin, who crushed Hugo Dellien 6-1 6-1 in just 58 minutes.

Spanish fifth seed Ramos-Vinolas beat local qualifier Facundo Bagnis 6-4 7-6 (7-3), despite wasting a match point at 6-5 in the second set.

It will be an all-Spanish affair in the last 16 after Pablo Andujar accounted for Filip Horansky 6-2 6-2.

Elsewhere, Jaume Munar (6-4 6-3 against Leonardo Mayer), Andrej Martin (7-6 [7-5] 6-4 over Federico Coria), Pedro Martinez (4-6 6-3 6-4 against Federico Gaio) and Corentin Moutet (6-4 6-3 over Thiago Monteiro) also progressed to the next round.

Felix Auger-Aliassime saw off the test of unseeded Bosnian qualifier Damir Dzumhur 6-7 (5-7) 6-2 6-2 to reach the last 16 of the Open Sud de France, but it took him longer than expected.

Despite breaking Dzumhur's serve at the first opportunity, Auger-Aliassime – who failed to get past the first round of the Australian Open – conspired to lose the first set, as his counterpart broke back straight away and eventually closed out the set in the tie-break.

That seemed to be the shot in the arm Auger-Aliassime needed, as the Canadian world number 21 cruised through the second and third sets – enjoying three breaks of service in the latter, though it still took him two hours, 31 minutes to clinch Tuesday's win.

Victory sets up a second-round clash with France's Pierre-Hugues Herbert, who eliminated Sergiy Stakhovsky 6-2 7-5, while seventh seed Filip Krajinovic also went through in straight sets, beating Enzo Couacaud 6-4 6-4.

Kazakhstan's Alexander Bublik will face second seed David Goffin next after a gruelling 6-7 (7-2) 6-1 7-6 (7-2) win over Henri Laaksonen.

Mikael Ymer and Emil Ruusuvuori also secured passage to the last 16.

James Duckworth was the highest seed in action at the Pune Open on Tuesday and the Australian – who is the sixth favourite – had little difficulty getting past Peter Gojowczyk 7-6 (7-5) 6-4.

The home contingent had mixed success. Arjun Kadhe lost out 6-2 6-4 to Jiri Vesely, but Prajnesh Gunneswaran ousted Yannick Maden 7-6 (7-4) 7-6 (7-5) to progress.

Ilya Ivashka, Nikola Milojevic, Egor Gerasimov and Roberto Marcora all made it through as well, the latter set to face top seed Benoit Paire next.

Fernando Verdasco fell to a shock first-round loss at the Cordoba Open, while fellow seed Pablo Cuevas advanced on Monday.

Verdasco, the seventh seed at the ATP 250 event played on clay, was beaten by qualifier Carlos Taberner 4-6 6-1 6-4 in Argentina.

In a clash between two Spaniards, Taberner – at 198 ranked 149 places below Verdasco – won three of the final four games.

Verdasco had made the quarter-finals in Doha and third round at the Australian Open to begin 2020, but the 36-year-old bowed out in his opener.

Sixth seed Cuevas had no such problems, beating local hope Federico Delbonis 7-5 6-2.

Earlier, Italian Gianluca Mager beat qualifier Juan Pablo Ficovich 6-2 3-6 6-2 and Attila Balazs overcame Lorenzo Sonego 6-2 7-6 (7-3).

Vasek Pospisil booked another meeting with fellow Canadian Denis Shapovalov after defeating Aljaz Bedene at the Open Sud de France.

Having lost to Shapovalov at the Auckland Classic last month, Pospisil will face him again following a 6-3 6-4 win over Bedene in the first round of the ATP 250 event on Monday.

Shapovalov, seeded third, has a bye in the first round along with Gael Monfils, David Goffin and Grigor Dimitrov.

Fifth seed Felix Auger-Aliassime does not play his opener until Tuesday, meaning the highest ranked player in action was Spain's Pablo Carreno Busta, but the Spaniard fell to a shock 3-6 6-4 6-3 defeat against Norbert Gombos.

In the day's other game, home favourite Gregoire Barrere sealed a round-two meeting with Dimitrov after a 6-2 7-6 (8-6) triumph over Joao Sousa.

At the Pune Open, fifth seed Yuichi Sugita cruised past Thomas Fabbiano 6-3 6-0, but there were defeats for home hopes Sumit Nagal and Ramkumar Ramanathan respectively in their matches against Viktor Troicki and Salvatore Caruso.

Ivo Karlovic is also out after losing in straight sets to Cedrik-Marcel Stebe, who will next face second seed Ricardas Berankis.

Novak Djokovic has underlined his ambition to beat Roger Federer's record grand slam haul.

An eighth Australian Open title – extending the men's record he already held – arrived on Sunday when Djokovic fended off Dominic Thiem in five sets.

A thrilling match looked to be going Thiem's way when he went 2-1 up in sets; however, experience at the highest level told as Djokovic recovered to triumph again at Melbourne Park.

Fitness permitting, Djokovic has every chance of passing Federer's record of 20 grand slam titles, and of taking his scalp atop the list of men with the most weeks spent at number one in the rankings.

Having already scooped 17 slams, Djokovic will turn 33 two days before the French Open starts, offering the opportunity of an 18th major.

Roland Garros has traditionally been Rafael Nadal's to lose, and the Spaniard would move level with Federer's overall total should be land another title in Paris.

But Djokovic may outlast both his rivals on tour, and there is no question the Serbian wants to climb to the top of the all-time list.

"At this stage of my career, grand slams are the ones I value the most. They are the ones I prioritise," Djokovic said.

"I do have professional goals. Grand slams are one of the main reasons why I am still competing and still playing a full season, trying to obviously get the historic number one. That's the other big goal.

"I put myself in this position, that is really good at the moment. I'm super happy with the way I started the season. It kind of sets the tone for the rest of the year.

"I've had that privilege to win this big tournament eight times. To start off the season with a grand slam win significantly boosts your confidence and your expectations are quite high for the rest of the season.

"But whatever happens, this season is already successful."

Djokovic has used the Australian Open as a platform on which to build one of the great tennis careers.

It was in Melbourne 12 years ago that he landed his first slam, beating Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, and he will almost certainly start as favourite in 12 months' time when he targets a ninth Australian Open.

"Especially in the first part of my career, I was dreaming of winning as many grand slams as possible," Djokovic said.

"When I started winning a couple of grand slams a year, a few years in a row, that's where I felt actually I can maybe challenge Roger and Pete Sampras, all these guys that were winning the most grand slams in their careers in the history of tennis."

Djokovic target of finishing as the player with the most weeks as ATP world number one is eminently achievable, and could be secured this season.

He will begin a 276th week in the top ranking on Monday, with only Sampras (286 weeks) and Federer (310 weeks) ahead of him.

Novak Djokovic felt he was "on the brink of losing" the Australian Open final against Dominic Thiem as he dealt with dehydration.

Djokovic was visited by the trainer during the third set on Sunday before responding to win 6-4 4-6 2-6 6-3 6-4 after almost four hours on Rod Laver Arena.

The Serbian great moved onto 17 grand slam titles, extending his record to eight at the Australian Open while reclaiming the world number one ranking.

But the 32-year-old said he was close to defeat as he struggled with his health during the final.

"Turbulent, I would say," he said, describing his win.

"It started off really well. I broke his serve right away. I felt the experience on my side playing many Australian Open finals, for him it was his first. It was very important for me to break his serve early in the match, which happened.

"After I lost the second set, I started to feel really bad on the court. My energy dropped significantly.

"To be honest, I don't still understand the reason why that has happened because I've been doing the things that I've been doing before all of my matches. I was hydrated well and everything. Apparently the doctor said I wasn't hydrated enough.

"I was on the brink of losing the match. Dominic is a fantastic tennis player that plays with tremendous amount of power in his shots, especially from the forehand side. He uses his slice really well. He disrupted my rhythm in my game at one point. He was a better player. Probably one point and one shot separated us. It could have gone a different way.

"I served and volleyed when I was facing a break point in the fourth and in the fifth. It worked both of the times.

"It could have also been different. Serve and volley is not something I'm accustomed to. I'm not really doing that that often. I kind of recognised that as an important tactic in those circumstances, and I'm really happy it worked."

Leading 2-1 in sets, Thiem squandered a break point early in the fourth set before Djokovic regained his energy.

Djokovic said he was battling at the end of the third set and his struggles had come as a surprise.

"I definitely did not feel good. I didn't know what the next moment brings. I was trying to keep myself alive mentally as well and emotionally because it was disappointing in a way from my side to actually feel this way," he said.

"I was a bit shocked that I did feel that way because everything was fine before the match. For the first two sets, everything was okay.

"But it's something that you have to accept that you're going through, those kinds of circumstances really kind of force me to let things go and to really try to be in the moment and fight my way back."

Dominic Thiem had no regrets as he was left feeling "emptiness" after his thrilling Australian Open final loss to Novak Djokovic.

Thiem fell short of winning a maiden grand slam title, losing 6-4 4-6 2-6 6-3 6-4 after almost four hours on Rod Laver Arena on Sunday.

Playing his third major final, the 26-year-old Austrian had his chances, squandering a break point in the fourth set and opportunities to get back on serve in the fifth.

But Thiem insisted he had no regrets after his loss to Djokovic, who claimed a record-extending eighth Australian Open title.

"I think there's not much to change. Also, in the last two sets, I definitely gave everything I had," he said.

"Novak is part of three guys who are by far the best players ever who played tennis. If you play a grand slam final against him, it's always going to be a match where very small details are decisive.

"What happened, I mean, if I could say anything, I would just say that maybe I could have converted the break point in the fourth set where I could have the lead 2-1. Then I think he had some issues in the second set. He recovered very well.

"He played really good after in set three and four. Of course, there were some small mistakes here and there, but they're happening. At the end was a super close five-setter. I don't really regret anything."

Thiem produced a memorable run in Melbourne, including wins over Rafael Nadal and Alexander Zverev in the quarter-finals and semis respectively.

The two-time French Open runner-up was exhausted, but said he would return hungry to win a first grand slam crown.

"I think I've rarely felt physically that tired, especially now after all the tension's gone," Thiem said.

"I played an unbelievable intense match against Rafa, such an intense match against Sascha [Zverev] in the semis. Today again I think almost over four hours. I think that was very demanding.

"Of course, I just feel a lot of emptiness right now. But, yeah, that's it. I know the feeling. I did after the last two in Paris.

"But, also already now I feel little bit of motivation to come back for the next grand slam. Well, if I have a little break, it's going to be bigger."

Dominic Thiem had no regrets as he was left feeling "emptiness" after his thrilling Australian Open final loss to Novak Djokovic.

Thiem fell short of winning a maiden grand slam title, losing 6-4 4-6 2-6 6-3 6-4 after almost four hours on Rod Laver Arena on Sunday.

Playing his third major final, the 26-year-old Austrian had his chances, squandering a break point in the fourth set and opportunities to get back on serve in the fifth.

But Thiem insisted he had no regrets after his loss to Djokovic, who claimed a record-extending eighth Australian Open title.

"I think there's not much to change. Also, in the last two sets, I definitely gave everything I had," he said.

"Novak is part of three guys who are by far the best players ever who played tennis. If you play a grand slam final against him, it's always going to be a match where very small details are decisive.

"What happened, I mean, if I could say anything, I would just say that maybe I could have converted the break point in the fourth set where I could have the lead 2-1. Then I think he had some issues in the second set. He recovered very well.

"He played really good after in set three and four. Of course, there were some small mistakes here and there, but they're happening. At the end was a super close five-setter. I don't really regret anything."

Thiem produced a memorable run in Melbourne, including wins over Rafael Nadal and Alexander Zverev in the quarter-finals and semis respectively.

The two-time French Open runner-up was exhausted, but said he would return hungry to win a first grand slam crown.

"I think I've rarely felt physically that tired, especially now after all the tension's gone," Thiem said.

"I played an unbelievable intense match against Rafa, such an intense match against Sascha [Zverev] in the semis. Today again I think almost over four hours. I think that was very demanding.

"Of course, I just feel a lot of emptiness right now. But, yeah, that's it. I know the feeling. I did after the last two in Paris.

"But, also already now I feel little bit of motivation to come back for the next grand slam. Well, if I have a little break, it's going to be bigger."

Novak Djokovic was in charge, and then he was not, He was injured, and then he was not. He was sliding to defeat, yet suddenly he was not.

And now the Serbian is a 17-time grand slam champion, fast closing on Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer on the all-time list, after an eighth Australian Open title.

World number one again, into the bargain.

And that familiar beat goes on. Federer, Nadal and Djokovic have now swept up the last 13 slams between them. Interlopers, keep trying your best lads.

Many greats of the Open era barely gave a Castlemaine XXXX about the Australian Open until the mid-1980s, the likes of Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe repeatedly giving Melbourne a miss.

Yet Djokovic has built his career around repeated triumphs on Rod Laver Arena and is now 8-0 in Australian Open finals, joining Nadal and Federer as the only players to have won a single slam eight or more times.

Nadal's 12 Roland Garros triumphs may never be surpassed, Federer has savoured eight Wimbledon successes, and now Djokovic belongs to the eight-and-up club.

In previous years Djokovic has used this fortnight as a springboard to a new season, but he arrived at Melbourne Park already on a high, fresh from helping Serbia to glory in Sydney in the inaugural ATP Cup, fresh from beating Nadal so soon into a new season. Fresh to take on the world.

Yet for a long stretch of this five-set final against Dominic Thiem, Djokovic looked anything but fresh.

After trading breaks, Djokovic was gifted the first set when Thiem flunked a backhand and then double-faulted.

Usually a mighty front-runner, Djokovic's game began to splutter. Two double faults in game three of the second set saw him hand over the advantage to Thiem, who was ahead despite his often mighty backhand operating temperamentally.

It was that single-handed shot that was threatening to undo Thiem's otherwise fine work as he forged to level the match, and a wild example gave back the break, with Djokovic looking sharper after a change of racket.

But the 32-year-old from Belgrade can blow up too, and when he dropped serve for a second time in the set, after being twice penalised for time violations before slamming a forehand over the baseline, Djokovic was rattled.

He approached chair umpire Damien Dumusois, tapped him on the shoe and snapped: "Great job man, especially in the second one. You made yourself famous, well done."

The inelegant show of dissent was followed by Thiem wrapping up the set then swiftly tearing to a 4-0 lead in the third.

Thiem's backhand was back, while Djokovic appeared physically sapped. Limping, at times almost unsteady on his feet; anyone else and you might have written him off.

But Djokovic has shown a limp and followed it with a sprint before.

And although Mr Dumusois had not heard the end of Djokovic's complaints - the umpire's failure to immediately over-rule a call of 'out' led to another snippy rebuke - soon the match began to turn around.

Thiem made sure of set three, but just as a first grand slam title came into the Austrian's sights, it was clinically wrenched away.

A cheap concession of serve in the eighth game of the fourth set allowed Djokovic to level. Thiem was a rabbit in the headlights, Djokovic on full beam.

Breaking in the third game of the decider put Djokovic firmly in control, and that was swiftly followed by the saving of two break points, which effectively killed Thiem.

So what then of Thiem?

He said all the right things afterwards, praising Djokovic and speaking of the bigger picture in light of Australia's bushfire crisis.

But after two French Open final defeats to Rafael Nadal, another slam setback will feel more painful by the day, particularly as he was in the ascent this time.

Ask Andy Murray, who lost four slam finals before making his breakthrough at the 2012 US Open, what these days feel like below the surface.

To take a Murrayism, Thiem is getting closer.

Thiem is certainly due a break. He fell short in the ATP Finals title match last November, losing to Stefanos Tsitsipas, and split from girlfriend Kristina Mladenovic at around the same time.

In an eye-catching move, he hired his compatriot Thomas Muster to join his coaching team for 2020, but they have already parted company.

When he beat Djokovic during the ATP Finals, Thiem said it took "something outstanding, something unusual" to achieve that feat.

That was a best-of-three contest though. Over five sets, Djokovic, Nadal and Federer remain the untouchable trio when it comes to slam finals.

A Djokovic fan, wearing a red and white T-shirt bearing the message "Serbia against the world", roared on his man as he reached the brink of this latest triumph.

Federer's haul of 20 slams is within striking range, with Djokovic three short of the Swiss and two behind Nadal.

And here's a thing: the men's game has still yet to see a grand slam singles winner born in the 1990s.

Thiem would have become the first. He held this match in his hands, and he dropped it.

Australian Open champion Novak Djokovic and runner-up Dominic Thiem each offered a sense of perspective following their thrilling men's singles final at Melbourne Park, with the Serbian issuing a call for unity in the wake of a number of tragic events at the start of 2020.

Djokovic came from two sets to one down inside Rod Laver Arena on Sunday to prevail 6-4 4-6 2-6 6-3 6-4 and claim a record-extending eighth Australian Open crown, denying Thiem a maiden grand slam title.

In the on-court presentation, both players were keen to highlight matters away from the court, with Djokovic referencing both the Australian bushfires and last weekend's death of NBA great Kobe Bryant, his friend and mentor.

After Thiem had spoken movingly about the troubles in Australia, Djokovic stated: "As Dominic was saying, there were some devastating things that started 2020, with huge bushfires here in Australia, conflicts in some parts of the world, people dying every day. One person that I considered close in my life and was a mentor to me, Kobe Bryant, passed away as well, with his daughter.

"I would just like to, I guess, say that this is a reminder to all of us that we should stick together more than ever, be with our families, stay close to the people that love you, that care about you.

"Of course we are part of professional sport, we compete and we try our best, but obviously there are more important things in life and it's important to be conscious and humble about things that are happening around you."

Thiem had earlier said: "There are way more important things in life and it's very tough what this beautiful country has been through and is still going through.

"I think that the Australian Open was a great distraction, but I still hope that Australia - it's so beautiful, it's so amazing - all the people who were affected, the wildlife and the animals that were affected, that they are recovering very soon and that a disaster like this never happens again."

Djokovic and Thiem paid tribute to each other's efforts in the final, with the champion telling his rival: "It wasn't meant to be tonight. Tough luck, and it was a tough match, but you were very close to winning it and you definitely have a lot more time in your career and I am sure that you will get one of the grand slam trophies ... and more, more than one."

A similarly gracious Thiem congratulated his opponent and hailed the all-conquering trio of Djokovic, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal - who now have 56 slam singles titles between them - for bringing "men's tennis to a completely new level".

He added: "I'm really proud and happy that I can compete in this time and this period of tennis. I fell a little bit short today, but I hope that I can soon get revenge."

Novak Djokovic extended his record for the most Australian Open titles, clinching an eighth after edging Dominic Thiem in Sunday's final.

The Serbian star moved onto 17 major crowns by overcoming Thiem 6-4 4-6 2-6 6-3 6-4 after three hours, 59 minutes on Rod Laver Arena.

Djokovic became the third man to win a single major eight times, with Rafael Nadal (12 French Open titles) and Roger Federer (eight at Wimbledon) having also achieved the feat.

We take a look back at all of his Australian Open successes.

2008 – A maiden grand slam title

Aged 20, this was Djokovic's fourth main-draw appearance in Melbourne and his previous best had been the fourth round the year prior.

But he produced a flying run to the final, beating Lleyton Hewitt in straight sets in the last 16 and top seed Federer in the semis.

Djokovic, the third seed, was left with a surprise opponent in the final and he made the most of his chance, coming from a set down to beat Jo-Wilfried Tsonga.

It was the first grand slam since the 2005 Australian Open not won by either Federer or Nadal.

2011 – The beginning of complete Melbourne dominance

Djokovic had to wait three years for his second title in Melbourne, but it started a wonderful run of dominance.

He was largely untouchable again on his way to the final, including wins over top-10 seeds Tomas Berdych and Federer.

Djokovic crushed Andy Murray 6-4 6-2 6-3 in the decider to win the first of an incredible three grand slams in 2011.

 

2012 – Coming through two epics

This would be a major best remembered for two matches – Djokovic's semi and final.

He took almost five hours to get past Murray in the last four in a match that seemed certain to ruin his chances in the decider.

Somehow, Djokovic came through that too, beating Nadal 5-7 6-4 6-2 6-7 (5-7) 7-5 in the longest Open Era grand slam final, which went for a gruelling five hours, 53 minutes.

2013 – Hat-trick complete

Djokovic extended his winning streak at the Australian Open to 21 matches with a third straight title.

He became the first man in the Open Era to win a hat-trick of titles in Melbourne.

Djokovic took five hours to get past Stan Wawrinka – the man who would break his run the following year – in the fourth round before again beating Murray in a final.

 

2015 – Another Wawrinka marathon, another Murray final

Fernando Verdasco and Milos Raonic were unable to stop Djokovic and, this time, Wawrinka failed too.

Djokovic beat the Swiss star in a five-set semi-final before a familiar face stood between him and another title.

Murray managed to split the first two sets, but Djokovic ran away with it from there 6-3 6-0 for a fifth crown.

2016 ­– Record equalled after Simon scare

It was the fourth round that proved to be the biggest scare in Djokovic's bid for a record-equalling sixth Australian Open title.

But he got through another gruelling five-setter, this time against French 14th seed Gilles Simon.

Kei Nishikori, Federer and Murray were unable to stop him from there as Djokovic joined Roy Emerson on six Australian Open crowns.
 

2019 – Record claimed in flawless fashion

For a six-time champion and the world number one, this seemed like a quiet run by Djokovic.

He dispatched of up-and-comers Denis Shapovalov and Daniil Medvedev, spent less than an hour on court with an exhausted Nishikori and was almost flawless against Lucas Pouille.

Only Nadal stood between him and a record seventh Australian Open title in a repeat of their epic 2012 final.

And Djokovic may have saved his best performance for the final, dismantling Nadal in just over two hours.

2020 – Thiem test survived to close in on Federer, Nadal

Djokovic entered the tournament on the back of six impressive singles wins at the ATP Cup.

After a brief first-round hiccup against Jan-Lennard Struff, Djokovic cruised into the quarter-finals.

He continued his dominance of Milos Raonic with a 10th win in as many meetings with the Canadian and then brushed a hurt Federer aside.

Thiem, playing his third major final, was a huge test, but Djokovic survived after almost four hours to extend his record in Melbourne. It was his 17th major title, moving closer to the tallies of Federer (20) and Nadal (19), as he reclaimed the number one ranking.

Novak Djokovic clinched a 17th grand slam title and record-extending eighth Australian Open crown with an epic five-set win over Dominic Thiem.

The Serbian required an impressive comeback against Thiem, continuing his dominance in Melbourne courtesy of an enthralling 6-4 4-6 2-6 6-3 6-4 victory after three hours, 59 minutes on Rod Laver Arena.

Djokovic has claimed the title every time he has reached the semi-finals of the Australian Open, and he maintained that record while closing in on Roger Federer (20) and Rafael Nadal (19) for most majors won by a man.

The 32-year-old also joined that duo as the only men to win a single major eight times, with Nadal (12 French Open crowns) and Federer (eight at Wimbledon) having also achieved that feat.

Djokovic had been frustrated, particularly after receiving two time violations in a matter of points in the second set and he also called for the trainer in the third, but he found the right answers against an opponent who had beaten him in four of their previous five meetings.

Thiem fell short of a maiden grand slam title, losing a third major final but first away from Roland Garros, as the Austrian 26-year-old faltered late.

The duo exchanged breaks to start, but it was Thiem enduring the greater struggles on serve.

While he battled hard – saving one set point with his aggression in the 10th game – a double fault handed Djokovic the opener.

Needing a response, Thiem found a break to lead 2-1 in the second set, aided by a pair of double faults from a frustrated Djokovic.

Thiem saved a break point in the sixth game, but gave up his advantage in the eighth, when he pulled the trigger on a backhand down the line too early with a shot that was becoming a problem rather than a weapon.

But Thiem broke again in the next game, during which Djokovic received two time violations, served a double fault and committed two sloppy errors before directing words at the chair umpire at the change of ends, none of which distracted his opponent from closing out the set.

Thiem had started to assume control from the baseline, and he took the Djokovic serve in the opening game of the third after the Serbian pushed a backhand down the line wide before incredibly falling 4-0 behind.

Djokovic called the trainer at 4-1 down but there was no denying Thiem, who served out the set while showing some nerves before his opponent left the court.

"Nole! Nole! Nole!" chants rang out early in the fourth set among what was largely a pro-Thiem crowd inside Rod Laver Arena and Djokovic responded, capitalising on a sloppy game from the fifth seed to break for 5-3 before forcing a decider.

Thiem missed two forehands to give up a break to Djokovic in the third game of the fifth set before wasting two break points in the fourth.

He managed a gritty hold to stay in the match in the seventh game but was unable to deny Djokovic, who had no trouble serving it out.

Novak Djokovic is aiming to win a fifth grand slam in seven at the Australian Open on Sunday.

The Serbian faces Dominic Thiem in the final in Melbourne looking to extend his record to eight titles in the tournament and repeat his 2019 triumph.

It is continuing another dominant period for the 16-time grand slam champion, a spell which began at Wimbledon in 2018.

But how does his recent run of success compare to his previous triumphs, as well as those enjoyed by his 'Big Three' rivals Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal?

Federer – 8 in 10, 2005-07

The Swiss great was almost unstoppable for a period beginning at Wimbledon in 2005. From 2003 at the All England Club to the 2010 Australian Open, Federer incredibly won 16 of 27 grand slams, with a couple of separate utterly stunning runs. From Wimbledon 2005 to the 2007 US Open, Federer won eight of the 10 majors and was beaten in the finals of the other two. Only Nadal at the French Open (2006 and 2007) could deny Federer, who enjoyed wins over Andy Roddick (twice), Andre Agassi, Marcos Baghdatis, Nadal (twice), Fernando Gonzalez and Djokovic in deciders during that period. Starting at Wimbledon 2004, Federer also won 10 of 14 majors, but he has just four grand slams since 2011.

Djokovic – 6 in 8, 2014-16

The Serbian star began to make the most of his opportunities, starting from midway through 2014. Heading into that tournament, Djokovic had made 13 grand slam finals but won just six. However, since the Wimbledon final six years ago, he has won 10 major deciders and lost just two. A thrilling five-set final against Federer started the run before he reclaimed his Australian Open title. Stan Wawrinka upset him in the decider in Paris before the beginning of the 'Nole Slam', Djokovic winning four straight majors to hold every grand slam trophy simultaneously. A shock third-round exit to Sam Querrey at Wimbledon in 2016 ended a 30-match winning run at majors for Djokovic, who would have to wait until 2018 for his next grand slam title.

Nadal – 4 in 5, 2010-11

In an extraordinary career, Nadal has won just one Australian Open and two Wimbledon titles, impacting his runs. The Spaniard's best year in terms of major titles was 2010, when he claimed three before adding another at Roland Garros in 2011. Stunned by Robin Soderling in his first French Open loss in 2009, Nadal brushed the Swede aside in the final the following year, kick-starting a run of three straight major wins. Tomas Berdych and Djokovic were beaten in the Wimbledon and US Open deciders respectively, but his bid to hold all four at once was ended in the quarter-finals in Melbourne, where he suffered a hamstring injury and fell to David Ferrer. But, back in Paris, Nadal won a sixth French Open crown.

Novak Djokovic will take what is considered a major advantage into his Australian Open final against Dominic Thiem – an extra day's rest.

The 16-time grand slam champion brushed aside Roger Federer in straight sets on Thursday, a day before Thiem edged out Alexander Zverev in four.

At 32, Djokovic is six years older than Thiem, a player he holds a 6-4 win-loss record over but has lost to in four of their past five meetings.

But an extra day off has seemingly had little impact on the result of Sunday's final, especially in the past decade, when the player with more rest has won five and lost as many deciders.

"I have two days of no match right now, which actually is really good," Serbia's Djokovic said after his win over a hurting Federer.

"It gives me more time to recuperate and gather all the necessary energy for the finals."

Thiem, unsurprisingly, saw the benefits of not having the extra day despite coming off two tough wins over world number one Rafael Nadal and Zverev.

"There are disadvantages but also advantages. I think it's also a little bit of a challenge to have all the time one day off and all of a sudden two," he said.

"Of course, I have less time to regenerate, but with all the adrenaline and everything, it's going to be fine.

"I played two super intense matches against Rafa and now against Sascha [Zverev]. Of course, I'm going to feel it, especially [on Saturday]. But I'm going to have great treatment, easy hit [on Saturday], and then of course try everything to be 100 per cent on Sunday night."

Since 2010, the men with extra rest have won five and lost five finals. Djokovic has won his three, but he has also won all seven of his deciders in Melbourne.

Going further back and the win-loss record for men who played their semi-final a day earlier since 2000 is 11-9, barely an advantage.

Thiem has spent almost six hours longer on court than Djokovic, but in the prime of his career and eyeing a maiden grand slam title, having a day's less rest should seemingly have little impact.

Entering Australian Open final with an extra day's rest since 2000
2019: Rafael Nadal (lost against Novak Djokovic)
2018: Marin Cilic (lost against Roger Federer)
2017: Roger Federer (won against Rafael Nadal)
2016: Novak Djokovic (won against Andy Murray)
2015: Andy Murray (lost against Novak Djokovic)
2014: Stan Wawrinka (won against Rafael Nadal)
2013: Novak Djokovic (won against Andy Murray)
2012: Rafael Nadal (lost against Novak Djokovic)
2011: Novak Djokovic (won against Andy Murray)
2010: Andy Murray (lost against Roger Federer)
2009: Roger Federer (lost against Rafael Nadal)
2008: Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (lost against Novak Djokovic)
2007: Roger Federer (won against Fernando Gonzalez)
2006: Marcos Baghdatis (lost against Roger Federer)
2005: Marat Safin (won against Lleyton Hewitt)
2004: Marat Safin (lost against Roger Federer)
2003: Andre Agassi (won against Rainer Schuttler)
2002: Thomas Johansson (won against Marat Safin)
2001: Andre Agassi (won against Arnaud Clement)
2000: Andre Agassi (won against Yevgeny Kafelnikov)
Wins: 11 Losses: 9

Dominic Thiem has shown the highly rated 'Next Gen' the way, though the rest of the Australian Open finalist's generation provides a cautionary tale.

Thiem's rise continues in Melbourne, where he will face Novak Djokovic in the men's singles final on Sunday in his third major decider and first away from the French Open.

But the 26-year-old Austrian sits in a generation alone; more established than the improving 'Next Gen' but still – like all others – chasing Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic.

The likes of Stefanos Tsitsipas, Alexander Zverev, Matteo Berrettini, Denis Shapovalov, Andrey Rublev, Karen Khachanov, Felix Auger-Aliassime and Alex de Minaur can learn from Thiem's progression, while Daniil Medvedev, 23, has quickly proven himself.

Zverev, beaten by good friend Thiem in the semi-finals, admitted this week he had been impatient in his pursuit of grand slam success. The German is the world number seven and Melbourne shaped as a breakthrough, a new approach helping the 22-year-old into a first major semi.

Thiem only won his first Tour title at 21, with his next three also coming at ATP 250 level before he took another step by clinching the Mexican Open in February 2016.

A reputation on clay being quickly established, he reached a semi-final at Roland Garros later that year – and another in 2017. Thiem shapes as the successor to Nadal's immovable crown in Paris, falling to the Spanish great in the past two finals.

It has been steady growth, although the improvement on hard courts has been particularly impressive, including a title at Indian Wells last year.

Patiently working, Thiem has risen to be being one win away from a breakthrough major, and his journey can be looked at by what is a supremely talented up-and-coming group.

Zverev won the 2018 ATP Finals, but it is last year's event in London that is set to be looked upon as the moment the 'Next Gen' truly made their move. Tsitsipas and Thiem played out a thrilling final, the former having beaten Federer in a semi and the latter posted wins over Djokovic and the Swiss great in the group stage.

Thiem is the only 26-year-old in the world's top 50 and just one of five in the top 100, joined by Juan Ignacio Londero, Hugo Dellien, Roberto Carballes Baena and Dennis Novak.

He was once a world number two junior and reached the 2011 French Open boys' singles final, falling to Bjorn Fratangelo.

A quick look at that year's boys' singles quarter-finals at all grand slams makes for interesting viewing. Kyle Edmund and Lucas Pouille have made Australian Open semi-finals, Jiri Vesely once reached 35th in the world, Carballes Baena is among them, as is the injury-plagued Jason Kubler and doubles star Mate Pavic.

Before Thiem takes to the court to face Djokovic, Luke Saville – a two-time slam winner as a junior – will play the men's doubles final. A highly rated junior, Saville beat Thiem in the juniors at the Australian Open in 2011 but has struggled to take the step up.

The current 'Next Gen' have already been more impressive and now they have Thiem to follow.

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