NBA MVP criteria needs to be revisited

By September 20, 2020

 On many a Sunday, I realize that people have looked at the stories they have seen throughout the week with different lenses. I have my own personal take on some of these issues and I will share them with you. Welcome to #INCASEYOUMISSEDIT

 The NBA’S MVP criteria need to be re-visited.

 Milwaukee Bucks star Giannis Antetokounmpo has been named the NBA's Most Valuable Player for the second successive season after garnering 25 of the 101 first-place votes and 962 points in the voting. Although the award is based on the regular season, the fact that it is awarded during the playoffs makes it potentially contentious. In this case, although Giannis gets the award, his team, the Milwaukee Bucks, have gone home after the Miami Heat eliminated them in the second round of the playoffs.

The decision has raised eyebrows including that of that Los Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James with some even suggesting that LeBron was robbed of the award based on his overall contribution to his team.

James, who is still in contention to win his fourth NBA title, also alluded to the inconsistencies, “Sometimes it's the best player on the best team. Sometimes it is the person with the best season statistically. Giannis had a hell of a season; I can definitely say that."

The fact that the Lakers are in the Western Conference Finals while Milwaukee barely made it through the playoffs triggered the negative criticisms. Once the criteria for winning the award is consistent and the timing that the award is presented is altered, this will help in ensuring that there is little negative perception. There is a need to change and there needs to be consistency!

Glad to see both the Windies and England women supporting the Black Lives Matter movement.

Taking a knee and wearing the Black Lives Matter logo are more than mere gestures. They are constant reminders and a subtle form of education.

Both the West Indies and England women will wear the Black Lives Matter logo on their playing shirts during the Vitality T20 International (T20I) series that begins on Monday, September 21. The decision was a mutual one taken by players and management based on current situation globally.

 West Indies Women’s captain Stafanie Taylor has been vocal about the cause, accepting that as athletes they have an important role to play in raising awareness of the Black Lives Matter movement. I commend the women, as their actions can be a driving force for education and giving a voice to the voiceless.

 All matches will be played behind closed doors at Derby, where West Indies have been based for the past three weeks.  Monday's series opener will be the first Women's international match since Australia defeated India in the T20 World Cup final in March of this year.

Trinidad and Tobago Football have been reduced to a game of wait and see. 

FIFA has given the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) an extended deadline’ of September 23 to withdraw its claims against it currently before the Trinidad and Tobago High Court of Justice.

Ousted TTFA president William Wallace, who says he has the support of roughly half of the local body’s delegates, has refused to back down.

 On August 26, FIFA Secretary General Fatma Samoura firmly requested’ that the ‘TTFA former leadership’ withdraw its claim from the local High Court ‘by 16 September 2020 at the latest’. She said then that ‘failure to comply with this directive would result in the commencement of suspension proceedings.

With an extra five days, one can only hope that those involved in the ongoing dispute will act in a manner that will ensure that football wins. Meanwhile, the football-loving public is left sitting on the edge of their seats awaiting the fate of the sport they love. Let us hope good sense prevails!

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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    A Court of Appeal in Trinidad and Tobago today set aside a ruling by High Court Judge Carol Gobin that FIFA’s removal of the duly elected executive was “illegal null and void and of no effect”. According to reports out of the twin-island republic, United TTFA that is led by William Wallace, was also ordered to pay legal costs.

    FIFA had dissolved the executive of the TTFA in March and installed a normalization committee to oversee the affairs of the association. The ousted executive then took the matter to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) but eventually withdrew the case citing institutional bias.

    They put the matter before the TT High Court of Justice where High Court Justice Carol Gobin ruled twice in favour of the TTFA – on August 13 and October 13 – in the first instance to say that the TTFA were entitled to justice from the local courts and then to declare FIFA’s actions illegal and null and void.

    However, on Friday, the Court of Appeal, ruled in favour of the football’s governing body.

    “The filing of these proceedings was a breach of Article 67 of the TTFA’s Constitution of which the TTFA is bound,” Chief Justice Ivor Archie ruled, according to 868Wired. “We are of the view that section 67 is unambiguous… The filings of these proceedings was therefore ultra vires, null and void and of no effect and will be struck out.

    ‘In accordance with the relevant provisions of the FIFA Statutes, any appeal against a final and binding decision passed by FIFA, CONCACAF or the leagues shall be heard by the CAS, unless another arbitration tribunal has jurisdiction in accordance with Article 69.

    Prior to Friday's decision, William Wallace had said that if the ruling went against him, he would end all legal challenges against FIFA.

    "If we lose this matter, that's it for me. There is no more appealing,” Wallace said in an interview on WESN Content Capital TV. “I [would] say 'Thank you very much' and I walk away. I have no intention of going beyond our court.”

    The TTFA was represented by Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Jason Jones and Crystal Paul. Christopher Hamel-Smith SC, Jonathan Walker and Cherie Gopie represented FIFA.

  • In Honour Of: Merlene Ottey, her legendary achievements must never be forgotten In Honour Of: Merlene Ottey, her legendary achievements must never be forgotten

    I recently had a rather eye-opening conversation with an 18-year old about one of Jamaica’s greatest ever female sprinters Merlene Joyce Ottey.

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    She backed that up with 14 World Outdoor medals and 7 World Indoor medals and she still holds the 200m world indoor record at 21.87 seconds.

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  • Holder hurt by cricket's lack of continued Black Lives Matter support Holder hurt by cricket's lack of continued Black Lives Matter support

    West Indies captain Jason Holder has expressed disappointment for the overall lack of continued support for the Black Lives Matter movement during ongoing cricket tours.

    Initially, England and West Indies adopted the anti-racism stance ahead of their three-Test matches in July as part of the worldwide protests following the death of George Floyd in Minnesota. 

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