Ultimate XI T20 Openers: KL Rahul

By July 30, 2020
KL Rahul KL Rahul

Picked for the Indian squad for the four-Test tour against the West Indies in 2016, KL Rahul played in the second Test at Jamaica and scored 158, his highest Test score then.

In the process, he became the first Indian opener to score a century in his debut Test in the West Indies.

In the first match of the T20I series in the United States, he scored a century off 46 balls in a losing cause, the second-fastest ever and fastest by an Indian. He also set the world record for being the only player to score a hundred in his first innings as an opener in both Tests and ODIs.

Rahul set the record for the fastest batsman to have scored centuries in all three formats in just 20 innings surpassing the record of Ahmed Shehzad who took 76 innings.

He is the first player in T20I history to score a century when batting at the number 4 position or lower (110*). On July 3, 2018, Rahul smashed his second T20 International ton against England. He is also the first Indian batsman to be dismissed hit-wicket in T20Is.

 

Career statistics (2013-present)

Full name: Kannaur Lokesh Rahul

Born: April 18, 1992, Bangalore, Karnataka (28)

Major teams:  India, Bangalore Brigadiers (Urban), India Under-19s, India Under-23s, Karnataka, Karnataka State Cricket Association Colts XI, Kings XI Punjab, Royal Challengers Bangalore, South Zone, Sunrisers Hyderabad

Playing role: Opening batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

T20I Career

Mat    Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50  

42           38           6        1461      110*      45.65     1000      146.10           2         11                        

 

T20 Career

Mat    Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50  

131        118        21         4076      110*      42.02     2908      140.16          3          33         

 

Career highlights

  • 1461 T20I runs scored at an average of 45.65
  • First T20I player to score a century when batting at number 4 position or lower
  • Fastest 50 in IPL history (14 balls)
  • One of three Indian batsmen to score a century in all formats (two T20I centuries)
  • 4076 T20 runs at 42.02
Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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