A legend has passed - rest in peace Sir Everton

By Mariah Ramharack July 05, 2020

 

I use my Sundays to look back at what has been happening in the world of sport. On many a Sunday, I realise that people have looked at the stories they have seen throughout the week through different lenses. I have my own personal take on some of these issues and I will share them with you. Welcome to #INCASEYOUMISSEDIT.

May his legacy live forever!

The last of the three Ws, Sir Everton Weekes, died this week at his Christ Church home, aged 95, after battling with an ailment for some time.  He was a man who impacted the lives of many on and off the field. His legacy will live on through his work and records.

Condolences poured in, the majority shedding light on the calibre of Sir Everton. Barbados Cricket Association President Conde Riley expressed sadness at the news.

“Sir Everton was one of our greats. He has made a massive contribution to Barbados and West Indies cricket. This is a sad time for cricket. We have lost a legend.”

Cricket West Indies had this to say:

“Our hearts are heavy as we mourn the loss of an icon. A legend, our hero, Sir Everton Weekes. Our condolences go out to his family, friends, and many fans around the world. May he rest in peace.”

What is clear is Sir Everton had a full career and the statistics speak for themselves. He began his international career against England on January 21, 1948, and enjoyed a career spanning 48 tests in 20 years. He accumulated an average of 58.61, scored 15 centuries, and 19 half-centuries, with a high score of 207.

One cannot forget, even for a second, his role in shaping the West Indies transition from being a competitive team to being one of the most dominant in sporting history.  Sir Everton Weekes was a true hero and son of West Indian soil. May his legacy live on through his work and the lives that he touched.

 Come on Skips! Time to dust off the rust!

Two intra-squad practice matches have been completed and there has been no sign of batting form from West Indies captain Jason Holder and he has hardly bowled. Some may say, it is just a practice match, do not get overworked!

However, I am fretting as I don’t think there will be a magical turnaround. Even though practice matches count for nothing, because of the lack of sports and training due to COVID-19, this one counts for something, even if it is simply confidence.

Holder continues to struggle to shake off a bit of rust, or allay injury concerns, after being dismissed cheaply in the second and final intra-squad match at Emirates Old Trafford, on Thursday. Scores of 0, 5, and 2 certainly raised eyebrows.  In the intra-squad practice matches the West Indies skipper’s highest score was 5, with his innings lasting just 13 deliveries.  It is also difficult to forget the all-rounder’s golden duck in the first internal match that ended in a draw last week.

In addition to time away from the pitch, Holder has recently been bothered by a mild ankle injury.  Despite claims that he has not been hampered by it, Holder has looked uncomfortable at the crease.

This lack of form is worrying, especially as this Windies group is young and the players will be looking to the number one Test allrounder to lead by example. The Windies is a stronger unit with the skipper fully fit.

 We are missing the bigger picture!

 As humans, sometimes we choose to focus on the wrong things, and in so doing, we are distracted from the bigger picture. President of the Barbados Cricket Association, Conde Riley, initially called for the immediate sacking of West Indies head coach, Phil Simmons, after he heard on a radio station in Barbados that Simmons had broken the bubble to attend the funeral of his father-in-law.

However, based on the report put out by Cricket West Indies Simmons got the Board’s approval and would self-isolate upon re-entry as well as undergo COVID-19 tests before rejoining the group.

Upon reading Mr. Riley’s reaction and CWI’s statement, the SportsMax Zone reached out to Mr. Riley regarding his pronouncements. In this interview Riley stated:

1. He had sent a letter of inquiry to CWI as he was not notified that Simmons was leaving the bubble. He said, “if it is true” that he left the camp for a funeral it was “reckless” and “endangered the players.”

2. Parts of his letter to CWI were leaked thereby misleading the public.

3. Being a board member, if he was notified, he would not have reacted impulsively.

4. There were three board meetings before the team left for England and at no time during those meetings was he made aware that Simmons's father-in-law had died.

 How could Mr. Riley and the CWI be so divergent in their views? Is there a bigger issue?

How did part of Riley’s letter get leaked to the media? Is there a lack of confidentiality and communication between CWI and its board members?

There appears to be more than what meets the eye here.

 

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