#IAmNotAFan of weird sports traditions

By Melissa Talbert May 20, 2020

Traditions in sports are important. They give individual sports a certain uniqueness and can make players feel comfortable. At the same time, some can be a bit strange— causing stares, laughter or judgement. Here are five weird traditions in sports.

 

Cricketers kissing the ball

It gets weirdly romantic when cricketers kiss the ball. The practice of kissing balls is so wrong to me— even if it’s done for good luck. The ball carries germs that can cause infection. It’s been in the palms of many players, it runs along the ground, and sometimes on the roof and out into the street, and the bat hits it a lot. Sometimes it goes into the wicketkeeper’s gloves and those haven’t been washed in aeons!

 

Screaming tennis players

After a while, the grunts of tennis players can get alarming. Imagine being a spectator at a tennis match and hearing continuous groans from players. I don’t know about you, but I’d probably be concerned, annoyed or even distracted. Don’t quote me on this, but zoning out has to be a regular thing at these matches; just to give your ears a break.

 

Boxers wearing robes

Boxers want to be perceived as anything but soft. Their personas are tough and rigid— their fans live for that! But wearing robes doesn’t do it justice. Seeing a man in a dress as he slips it off to the ground does not scream ‘let's get ready to rumble’.

 

Bouncing the tennis ball before you serve

Somehow it feels like maybe tennis players fancy themselves basketballers sometimes. I can’t help but think when they bounce the ball a few times before delivering a serve, “Isn’t that a basketball thing?” Some say it gives the player time to focus and develop a rhythm. But how much focus can you get from just bouncing the ball two or three times? For this reason, I believe it’s just one of those traditions that you do just because it’s been a part of the routine for a long time.

 

Ugly free throws

It’s unbelieve how unconventional some people can make the art of throwing a free throw. Don Nelson, Rick Barry, Joakim Noah, Chris Dudley and Jamaal Wilkes are all weird. Like every other player doing a free throw, they go up to the free-throw line and aim to shoot successfully but that’s as far as the comparisons can go. Their style and approach are out of the ordinary and nothing compared to what other players do. Still, it works for them.

I may not understand why they do what they do, but I know one thing. We all have weird habits. Most of the time we do them when nobody's watching. Athletes are the brave ones— they do them in front of everyone, judgement be damned.

Please share your thoughts on Twitter (@SportsMax_Carib) or in the comments section on Facebook (@SportsMax). Don’t forget to use #IAmNotAFan. Until next time!

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