Ultimate Test XI Profile: Chris Cairns

By May 08, 2020

When fit, Chris Cairns was one of the finest allrounders in the world.

The son of former New Zealand cricketer Lance Cairns, Chris starred in both the One-day and Test New Zealand teams, as well as the Canterbury New Zealand domestic championship team.

In 2000, he was named as one of five Wisden Cricketers of the Year.

In March 2004, he became only the sixth man to achieve an allrounder's double of 200 wickets and 3000 runs.

With the bat, Cairns has been the author of some of New Zealand cricket's most memorable innings, including his 158 from just 172 balls in a Test against South Africa in 2004.

However, plagued by constant knee and back injuries, after representing New Zealand in 2003-04 series against South Africa, he announced that the 2004 Test series in England would be his last.

In the first Test at Lord's, he passed Sir Vivian Richards's previous record of the most sixes in Test cricket.

Cairns finished his Test career with a batting average of 33.53 and a bowling average of 29.40.

 

Career Statistics 

Full name: Christopher Lance Cairns

Born: June 13, 1970, Picton, Marlborough

Major teams: New Zealand, Canterbury, Chandigarh Lions, ICC World XI, Northern Districts, Nottinghamshire

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast-medium

 

Test Career (Batting) - New Zealand (1989-2004)

Mat    Inns   NO    Runs    HS     Ave     BF      SR      100s    50s               

62      104       5      3320   158    33.53   5815   57.09      5        22             

    

Test Career (Bowling) - New Zealand (1989-2004)

Mat    Inns   Balls    Runs   Wkts   BBI      BBM      Ave   Econ   4w   5w   10w

62      104     11698   6410      218    7/27   10/100    29.40   3.28    11     13    1

 

Career highlights

  • Scored 3320 runs at an average of 33.53
  • Completed 5 centuries and 22 fifties
  • Took 218 wickets at 29.40
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