UltimateXI Profile: Dani Alves

By April 27, 2020
Dani Alves Dani Alves

It would be difficult to build a list of the greatest defenders of all time and leave out the most decorated player in the history of the game. Daniel Alves da Silva (Dani Alves) has had a career inclusive of 40 trophies in international and club football. The fact that he has played in so many of the great teams throughout his career is testimony to his quality. Often going unnoticed, Alves has gone about being one of the best defenders of all time in a very unfussy way, choosing instead to use his intelligence and tactical awareness to achieve his ends without much fanfare.

Alves seems to always be in the right place at the right time and his gift for crossing the ball is often underestimated.

Playing Career

Name: Daniel Alves da Silva
Date of birth: 6 May 1983
Birthplace: Juazeiro, Bahia, Brazil

Playing Position: Right back

 

International career

  • Brazil: 2006-Present (118 caps)

 

Honours

  • 2007 Copa America
  • 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup
  • 2019 Copa America

 

Individual

  • FIFA U-20 World Cup Bronze Ball: 2003
  • UEFA Cup Most Valuable Player: 2005–06
  • UEFA Super Cup Man of the Match: 2006
  • UEFA Team of the Year: 2007, 2009, 2011, 2015, 2017
  • ESM Team of the Year: 2006–07, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12
  • FIFA FIFPro World11: 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
  • FIFA FIFPro World11 2nd team: 2014
  • FIFA FIFPro World11 nominee: 2019 (4th defender)
  • La Liga Defender of the Season: 2008–09
  • FIFA Confederations Cup Team of the Tournament: 2013
  • La Liga Team of the Season: 2014–15
  • France Football World XI: 2015
  • Serie A Team of the Year: 2016–17
  • IFFHS Men's World Team: 2017
  • UNFP Ligue 1 Team of the Year: 2017–18
  • Copa América Most Valuable Player: 2019
  • Copa América Team of the Tournament: 2019

Club Career

  • 1963-1966 Fluminese
  • 1966-1974 Santos
  • 1974-1976 Fluminese
  • 1976-1977 Flamengo
  • 1977-1980 New York Cosmos
  • 1981 California Surf
  • 1982 New York Cosmos

        

Honours

  • Bahia - Copa do Nordeste: 2002
  • Sevilla - Copa del Rey: 2006–07; Supercopa de España: 2007; UEFA Cup: 2005–06, 2006–07; UEFA Super Cup: 2006
  • Barcelona - La Liga: 2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2012–13, 2014–15, 2015–16; Copa del Rey: 2008–09, 2011–12, 2014–15, 2015–16; Supercopa de España: 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013; UEFA Champions League: 2008–09, 2010–11, 2014–15; UEFA Super Cup: 2009, 2011, 2015; FIFA Club World Cup: 2009, 2011, 2015
  • Juventus - Serie A: 2016–17; Coppa Italia: 2016–17
  • Paris Saint-Germain - Ligue 1: 2017–18, 2018–19; Coupe de France: 2017–18; Coupe de la Ligue: 2017–18; Trophée des Champions: 2017, 2018
Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre is the Managing Editor at SportsMax.tv. He comes to the role with almost 20 years of experience as journalist. That experience includes all facets of media. He began as a sports Journalist in 2001, quickly moving into radio, where he was an editor before becoming a news editor and then an entertainment editor with one of the biggest media houses in the Caribbean.

Related items

  • Rookie coach Pirlo demands 'desire and ferocity' from Juve against Ranieri's Samp Rookie coach Pirlo demands 'desire and ferocity' from Juve against Ranieri's Samp

    Andrea Pirlo has vowed to prove his doubters wrong at Juventus, demanding "desire and ferocity" from the Italian champions in his first Serie A match in charge. 

    The former midfield maestro knows there are questions over his credentials for such a first major coaching job, which he was surprisingly handed when Maurizio Sarri was sacked in August. 

    But Pirlo was a prince of a ball-player with Milan, Juventus and Italy, and the 41-year-old says past playing experiences will be reflected in how he now leads a team from pitchside. 

    On Sunday, his first test comes when Juve go up against Sampdoria, a team led by the vastly experienced Claudio Ranieri. 

    "Doubts? I don't have any," Pirlo said. "Certainties? I'm at Juve, I coach a team of champions, it was easy for me to fit in and I'm fine. 

    "I don't have to show the differences with Sarri's Juve: we have the same goals." 

    He added: "I carry on my idea of football, which must be aggressive and based on mastery of the game. 

    "This period has not changed me; like I was a footballer, I'll be a coach. There are those who speak well of me and those who have doubts, but for me nothing changes: I am sure of what I am doing."

    He is clearly talking a good game already, demanding his team show their hunger from day one, but nothing less than another Scudetto will suffice as Juve chase a 10th successive league title. 

    New recruit Dejan Kulusevski and veteran Cristiano Ronaldo are set for roving attacking roles as Juventus target a flying start. 

    "A new season is beginning, we start from scratch and we'll have to face it with desire and ferocity," Pirlo said. "This is what I'm going to tell the lads tomorrow. We have to start well." 

    Pirlo said it was "easy to settle back in" at Juventus, five years after he left for a playing stint with New York City FC. 

    Experienced former team-mates Giorgio Chiellini, Leonardo Bonucci and Gianluigi Buffon are "behaving very professionally", Pirlo said. 

    "They call me 'Coach', out of respect for their team-mates as well," Pirlo said, speaking in Saturday's pre-match news conference. 

    Swedish winger Kulusevski, so impressive for Parma last season, is primed for his Juventus debut and the 20-year-old will be expected to show flexibility within the team. 

    Pirlo said: "Kulusevski is an intelligent player. He finds space by himself and is showing a lot of openness to play in different roles. 

    "We are inventing something. Neither Ronaldo nor Kulusevski will start central, they will move and rotate."

  • Chelsea's Zappacosta and Juve's Pjaca join Genoa on loan Chelsea's Zappacosta and Juve's Pjaca join Genoa on loan

    Davide Zappacosta and Marko Pjaca have joined Genoa on loan from Chelsea and Juventus respectively.

    Zappacosta, 28, spent last term in Serie A with Roma but made only nine league appearances, having suffered a torn anterior cruciate ligament injury while in the capital.

    The right-back joined the Blues in 2017, yet, having featured regularly across his debut campaign, he earned just one Premier League start in his second term.

    He appears to have fallen down the pecking order under Frank Lampard following the emergence of Reece James, but is under contract until 2022.

    Winger Pjaca, 25, has been at Juventus since 2016 after signing on a five-year deal from Dinamo Zagreb.

    However, the Croatian has failed to establish himself in the Bianconeri's first team – for whom he last played a Serie A game in March 2017 – and his spell at Genoa will be his latest loan away from the club after stints with Schalke, Fiorentina and Anderlecht.

    Genoa, who finished 17th in Serie A last season and narrowly avoided relegation, begin the new campaign at home to Crotone on Sunday.

  • Next Generation – Kulusevski's youth coaches outline the perfect pupil as Juventus bow awaits Next Generation – Kulusevski's youth coaches outline the perfect pupil as Juventus bow awaits

    As a kid, Dejan Kulusevski always appeared to have something special about him.

    This quality didn't lend itself to a brash, arrogant personality, rather his self-belief reflected a quiet confidence, a humble attitude.

    While the young Swedish winger might have started the 2019-20 season as something of an unknown quantity for many as he began a loan spell with Parma, to those who know him best he has been on the path to excellence for a long time.

    A product of Brommapojkarna's academy, Kulusevski's ambition – and ability – had seen him stand out way before he secured a move to Atalanta soon after his 16th birthday in July 2016.

    Four years on, Kulusevski is a Juventus player, having cost an initial €35million, and preparing for his first competitive match with the Bianconeri on Sunday, as Sampdoria visit Turin.

    A lot has changed in such a short period, but those who have been key to his development are adamant Kulusevski has the character to cope.

    A quest for personal improvement

    Roland Nilsson, now Sweden's Under-21 coach, has worked with Kulusevski since he was just 15. "I worked with him with the Under-16s and I could see he was a very good player," he told Stats Perform News. "We knew straight away that clubs from abroad had been there watching and I could understand why.

    "It was one of those where it was always decided [moving abroad early]. When he talked about moving to Italy, that was his thing, to progress as a footballer and educate himself in the long run, not the short term. He needed to go somewhere to educate himself, he knew it would be hard and he knew the work that needed to be put in was his own."

    Kulusevski moved to Bergamo alone to live in club-arranged accommodation, taking him completely out of his comfort zone and away from everything he knew – but his mentality had already set him apart from others.

    "It was going to be tough but his mind was set to do the job and being focused on it, which has been a strength of his through the years," Nilsson continued. "You're always surprised when it goes that quickly [for a player], but at the same time, with the skills he has, his mental strength as well and the awareness of what he needs to be doing, those are the key things for him, and the work rate he puts in on the pitch shows he's serious about what he's doing."

    Andreas Engelmark, first-team assistant and technical director at Brommapojkarna, has known Kulusevski even longer, first coaching him in 2012 when the tricky winger – then just 12 – played in the year above his age group. The pair even trained together during the coronavirus pandemic.

    "He's an easy guy to work with because he's always going to give you everything," Engelmark told Stats Perform News. "His mindset is very strong, he was confident he was going to make it back then and I think he's confident he's going to do well now. All players have doubt in themselves at times, but his mindset – he believes in himself but at the same time is humble."

    'He has everything necessary to be a success'

    There was never any doubt about Kulusevski's ability – technically gifted and a fine dribbler, but he wasn't without fault, as Engelmark explained: "The first time I coached him I was like, 'this guy has a great skill set but he's not working hard enough, not defending, he needs to use his team-mates more'."

    Engelmark found a player receptive to such feedback and always willing to learn, taking criticism on board and using it to further himself, which subsequently improved him individually and the team.

    "His work rate got higher and higher, but when we played good opponents he worked even harder," Engelmark continued. "In the last six months to a year with me, I think something happened – he started working harder than everyone else. He was our best player offensively, but he was also the guy who worked the most."

    Nilsson also noticed that improvement. "He knows that has been a bit of his weakness before, but he's taken that along with everything else and that's what he shows today – he does everything up and down [the wing]."

    Such observations are backed up by the fact Kulusevski managed 5.25 ball recoveries and 4.22 dribbles per 90 minutes last term, both well above the respective averages for his position (4.1 and 0.92).

    Kulusevski has just a single full season of Serie A experience under hit belt, though there was a maturity to his performances while on loan at Parma last term that belies his fledgling status.

    With 10 goals and eight assists in Serie A, he was the youngest player across Europe's top five leagues to reach at least eight in both metrics and the first foreign under-21 talent to net 10 times in Italy's top flight since 2012-13.

    Similarly, of all players in Europe's top five leagues to accumulate 15 goal involvements in 2019-20, only Erling Haaland was younger – by three months – than Kulusevski.

    Nevertheless, Engelmark feels Kulusevski will be challenged by transitioning – both mentality and performance-wise – from the expectations he has previously experienced, to those at perennial-winners Juventus.

    "He has everything necessary to be a success at that level, but what will be interesting is his consistency," he mused. "At Parma obviously his team-mates were good, but not top-level like at Juve now. At Parma they were defending a lot and they get out on the counter, so obviously he can go in and out of the game and it doesn't really matter.

    "For them, dominating isn't so important, it's about being smart and taking your chances, but at Juventus obviously they dominate teams, so it'll be important to be consistent for 90 minutes and be involved more."

    Kulu the craftsman

    With Parma, Kulusevski was one of the revelations of the 2019-20 season, his creative talents earmarking him as among the best.

    His 78 key passes worked out at 2.17 per match, more than double the average for players in his position (1.02). In turn, he averaged 0.22 assists every 90 minutes, but the norm for others in similar roles was 0.09.

    One of Kulusevski's most obvious strengths is his ability on the ball, with his close control aided by the fact he is strong on both feet (four goals came with his weaker right foot).

    He completed 77 dribbles last season, 2.14 every 90 minutes, which is also a major increase on the 0.92 average for Kulusevksi's position.

    Similarly, the young Swede proved himself a notable threat in front of goal. While players in comparable roles would expect 0.35 shots on target every game, Kulusevski's record was 0.72.

    As Engelmark noted, one of the main differences for Kulusevski this term will be the change from playing in a team used to being on the back foot to one generally in the ascendancy.

    He appears to have the all-round capabilities to be a real asset, particularly given his attacking output was excellent for a middling team, but maintaining that and producing consistently under greater pressure will be a new challenge.

    For players of a certain age and skill set, there can be a tendency to go overboard when attempting to establish themselves, and Nilsson's advice is to take belief in what has gone before.

    "I would say, go out and play the way as you've done before, not 'over-proving' for everyone else that he's a good player. They know he is good, but you need to show everyone else that you are, and when you move to a team like Juve you need to show up."

    The special attributes he has shown since he was a kid will stand Kulusevski in good stead, but arguably the vital element will be his mentality – Nilsson and Engelmark appear in no doubt this all-action winger will leave no stone unturned in his quest to reach the top.

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.