What should the Miami Heat do about Dion Waiters ?

By December 18, 2019
Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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  • Bogut 'still very keen' to play at Olympics despite postponement Bogut 'still very keen' to play at Olympics despite postponement

    Australia star Andrew Bogut is "still very keen" to play at the Olympics despite the Tokyo Games being pushed back until 2021.

    Bogut, 35, was expected to lead the Boomers at the Olympics this year, but the Games have been postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

    It led to questions over Bogut's future, but the Olympics remain a goal for the veteran, an NBA champion with the Golden State Warriors in 2015.

    "I'm still very keen. Obviously the plans for me were to get to the Olympics this year and then reassess," he told SEN on Thursday.

    "That's been thrown out of the window. I'm still up in the air about exactly what I'm going to do and how I go about my journey getting there and all that, I still haven't decided one way or another.

    "I think it's going to be a moving parts type thing and I think the main priority right now is to get this pandemic squashed.

    "Then, we can all make real-world decisions about our jobs and our families and all that kind of stuff, but until that happens it's kind of senseless to make decisions based on not knowing when the future's going to be open slather again."

    Australia have never won a medal in men's basketball at the Olympics, but finished fourth at the Rio Games in 2016.

  • Coronavirus: Mavs owner Cuban has 'no idea' when NBA will resume Coronavirus: Mavs owner Cuban has 'no idea' when NBA will resume

    Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban has backtracked from his comments over the NBA resuming next month by stating he has "no idea" when the next game will take place.

    Cuban recently stated in an interview with Dallas television station WFAA that he hoped the season would restart in the middle of May.

    But he said on Wednesday that it is impossible to know when there will be NBA action again due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

    "I have no idea," Cuban told ESPN's Get Up. "I mean, the only thing I know is that we're going to put safety first and we're not going to take any chances.

    "We're not going to do anything that risks the health of our players, our fans, our staff, the whole organisation. So right now, I really don't have anything new to say."

    He added: "All the experts have got to say it'll be absolutely safe. We cannot put anything ahead of the health and safety of our players and staff; that's it.

    "It's such a moving target, and nobody really has specifics. I mean, I haven't had any conversations where anybody has even discussed an actual date at this point."

    Cuban revealed playing matches with no fans could be an option.

    "It sounds great to me, and I'll tell you why: America needs sports," he said. "We need something to root for; we need something to be excited about.

    "Everybody in North Texas wants a reason to have the Mavs back on, and to get excited and to cheer together - even if there's not any fans, just being able to watch on television and get excited and yell at the TV and high-five people again.

    "We just need that. And so I'm all for it. Whatever we can make happen, I'm pro doing it."

  • Opinion: Hosts keep missing the point about COVID19 Opinion: Hosts keep missing the point about COVID19

    The hosts of the various big events in the world of sports have been missing the point over and over for the last three months, much like many governments have.

    The COVID-19 Pandemic has inch by inch, ground sports to a halt all over the world and looming events have had to be either cancelled or postponed as it becomes clear that the word ‘pandemic’ is as horrifying as it sounds and the world won’t get over this issue in a few weeks or months as administrators seem to feel.

    But even more important than that, these administrators seem to feel that whether or not an event can go on, depends on the environment at the event.

    But I suggest there is more to it than that.

    The Olympics, for instance, in Tokyo, Japan, seemed to hinge on whether or not the island could get its COVID-19 problems under control before the rest of the world would travel to the event.

    When it became clear that this would not be the case, the event was postponed.

    However, up until that time, even as preparatory events for the Olympics were being cancelled and/or postponed all over the world, the International Olympic Committee had been asking athletes to prepare as if there would still be an event in July of 2020.

    That, I believe, was unfortunate, because it meant, even without travelling to meets all over the world, training was putting athletes at risk of contracting the virus.

    The danger of picking up the virus becomes even more acute when you consider team sports and how much contact it takes to get one working in unison and performing at a high level.

    For that to happen, there needs to be a combination of technical staff, trainers, teammates, and much more. That will up the chances of contracting a virus and therefore it doesn’t matter what is happening at whichever venue in the world, the athletes are at risk.

    I am acutely aware that much planning goes into putting on a large event like the Olympics or the UEFA Champions League, and that there is a lot of money riding on the event going ahead as planned.

    These considerations, I believe, make decisions grey and not as completely black and white like it might from the outside, however, sports and entertainment being the last to get on board with social distancing was, in my mind, slightly callous.

    But that’s just in my mind. These organisers may well have foreseen the financial fallout for the athletes themselves and wanted to save them, for as long as they could, from months without earning in some cases.

    Whichever way you see it, the truth is COVID-19 is likely to bankrupt far more people than it kills.

    Many of the reports on COVID-19 have also indicated that it hurts people with underlying conditions and the elderly, so the athlete with his fitness at the peak of their value, along with usually being under 40, is not in any real danger.

    But how about the person the athletes give it to? And, as was the case of 21-year-old Spanish coach, Francisco Garcia, who knows who has an underlying condition that this virus may attack?

    Garcia, a coach at Atletico Portada Alta, found out he had undiagnosed Leukemia, after being admitted to hospital with coronavirus symptoms. By then, it was too late.

    How I see it is that people and countries can recover from going broke. It happens all the time.

    I’ve never seen anybody recover from being dead.

    Cricket West Indies and the England Cricket Board are entertaining the idea of having a series between the two, scheduled for June, behind closed doors.

    Hopefully, they think better of it in short order.

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