Windies legend Richards supports 'totally correct' Antigua and Barbuda COVID-19 lockdown

By Sporrts Desk April 08, 2020
West Indies legend Viv Richards. West Indies legend Viv Richards.

West Indies legend Sir Vivian Richards has come on out in strong support of the decisive measures taken by the government of Antigua and Barbuda in battling the COVID-19 epidemic.

As of Wednesday, the number of confirmed cases in the country stood at 19, with 2 deaths recorded so far.  In a bid to flatten the curve and prevent the spread of the disease the Antigua and Barbuda government took the stringent measures, with seven-day lockdown with began on April 2.  Prior to that, the country had closed the island's ports to passenger vessels and ferries.

During the curfew, only persons who transact essential business such as to seek medical attention or to purchase essential food or medical supplies have been allowed to move freely.  The move has been criticised in some quarters as damaging to the economy, but the legendary West Indies swashbuckler was in full support of the move.

Richards compared it with a decision he made several years ago not to take part in the infamous rebel tours of South Africa, despite being offered a blank check.  He has never regretted it.

“I am one of those individuals that when I make my mind up in terms of the decision making and all that, then that’s it and that, to me, was worth much more than money,” Richards said in an interview with the Antigua Observer.

“Take for instance the decision made here by our leaders in locking the place down, that’s totally correct and people look at the economic side of things but if you don’t have life then you can’t work on the economics. So the most important thing is to preserve life and if we can do that in a collective way, we can achieve our goals,” he said.

 

Related items

  • 'Cornwall was ready to go' - Windies spinner disappointed to not get ball for CPL final 'Cornwall was ready to go' - Windies spinner disappointed to not get ball for CPL final

    West Indies all-rounder Rakheem Cornwall insists he was ready to go for the St Lucia Zouks, despite not being picked to bowl in the Caribbean Premier League (CPL) final.

    The decision not to bowl Cornwall, who recently came back from representing the West Indies in England, raised a few eyebrows.  But, the spinner has not been among the tournaments leading wicket-takers for several seasons.  In addition, Zouks captain Darren Sammy had a battery of spin bowlers at his disposal, which included Roston Chase, who took more wickets than Cornwall in England.

    In the end, after making it to their first CPL final, as heavy underdogs, the Zouks fell short to the Trinbago Knight Riders.  Cornwall has insisted he was fit and ready to perform but his omission from the line-up was the captain’s choice.

    “It was basically the captain’s decision; maybe it was his gut feeling to go for the other bowlers.  He thought he didn’t need me at that time so he went for especially his depth bowlers,” Cornwall recently told the Antigua Observer.

    "The pitch was a spin bowlers pitch and I am always ready for whenever he calls on me and if he doesn’t then it is the case but I’m always set and ready if I am called upon,” he added.

     

  • 'WI missing out on top T20 talent' - Barbados Cricket Director Leslie insists CPL not enough to expose players 'WI missing out on top T20 talent' - Barbados Cricket Director Leslie insists CPL not enough to expose players

    Barbados Cricket Director Stephen Leslie has called on regional cricket custodians to do more to ensure top local T20 talent is not cast aside, in light of limited places in the Caribbean Premier League (CPL).

    The recently concluded edition of the tournament, which was won by the Trinbago Knight Riders, did feature some of the region’s emerging talent.  In fact, a list of 20 young players was, as is required, named ahead of the tournament and several players featured prominently throughout the competition. 

    The list included Alick Athanaze, Joshua Bishop, Leniko Boucher, Keacy Carty Roland Cato, Joshua da Silva, Dominic Drakes, Amir Jangoo, Nicholas Kirton, Mikyle Louis, Kirk McKenzie, Kimani Melius, Ashmead Nedd, Jeavor Royal, Jayden Seales, Keagan Simmons, Kevin Sinclair, Shamar Springer, Bhaskar Yadram and Nyeem Young. 

    There are, however, a few players who remain outside this group.  Leslie pointed to the example of Roshon Primus who represented Trinbago Knight Riders in the two previous seasons.  Leslie believes the idea of another country-based T20 tournament could be considered.

    “The CPL has a franchise model, which in my view, has not been able to expose the best T20 cricketer that ply their trade in the Caribbean,” Leslie told the Mason and Guest radio program.

    “I’ll give an example of Barbados.  Barbados started a T20 domestic tournament back in 2009.  Every year there are some players that contribute very well.  Roshon Primus, for example, does extremely well, but the opportunity for Roshon Primus to be selected, I’m not sure there is that level of transparency,” he added.

    “Simply put, you can have young U-19 West Indies players given an opportunity to make the franchises because they were on a global stage. You can have the West Indies emerging players from the Super50, did very well, given an opportunity to play T20 cricket.  But what happens to local Barbadian T20 players, Trinidadians, and those across the region who ply their trade and play consistently well in their domestic tournament.  I believe there is very little for those persons.”

  • ' No disrespect intended' - Australia coach Langer admits team could have discussed kneeling, insists BLM not forgotten ' No disrespect intended' - Australia coach Langer admits team could have discussed kneeling, insists BLM not forgotten

    Australia coach Justin Langer has admitted the team could have discussed continuing a show of solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, during the ongoing tour of England, but insists there was no disrespect or disregard meant.

    Legendary West Indies fast bowler Michael Holding was recently critical of both teams, as he pointed out that they had ditched the symbolic taking a knee gesture during the ongoing series. England and the West Indies showed support for the movement before all three Tests at the start of the season, and the practice continued for the one-day series against Ireland. It has not been seen for the visits of Pakistan and Australia.

    While insisting that the team had not forgotten the issue, Langer pointed out that Australia had simply been focused on the series and unusual circumstances, but that in retrospect there could have been more discussions surrounding the issue.

    “When Mikey says what he says, it’s certainly worth listening to. In terms of taking a knee, to be completely honest, we could have talked more about it perhaps leading up to the first game,” Langer said.

    “There was so much going on leading up to us getting here, maybe we should have talked more about it,” he added.

    “What we do talk about within the team was that we want to have a response that is sustained and powerful and that it can go not just in one action but a sustained period. Not just throughout this series and the summer but throughout time.

    “I just hope if it looked like there was a lack of respect, it wasn’t the intention of our team. We were very aware of it.”

    England pace bowler Jofra Archer had issued a much sharper response, insisting that England had not forgotten the issue and that Holding should have “done his research”.

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.