Coronavirus: Leicester City isolate three players showing symptoms

By Sports Desk March 12, 2020

Leicester City manager Brendan Rodgers has confirmed three of his players have shown symptoms of coronavirus and have been isolated from their team-mates.

Speaking at a news conference ahead of this weekend's scheduled Premier League match against Watford, Rodgers explained the club had acted as a precaution against the potential spread of COVID-19.

"We've had a few players that have shown symptoms and signs [of the coronavirus]," Rodgers told the media on Thursday.

"We've followed procedures and [as a precaution] they have been kept away from the squad.

"Working in football, it's about having that agility to move with what’s happening in football. We're guided by football and federations. We have to press on with our work and prepare as normal."

In a subsequent statement, the club said: "Leicester City Football Club can confirm that, as a precautionary measure, three members of its first team squad have undertaken a period of self-isolation following recent medical advice.

"In recent days, all three players presented with extremely mild illness and were advised by club medical staff, consistent with current government guidance, to stay home and contact the NHS 111 service.

"All three players were subsequently advised by NHS 111 that their symptoms were consistent with common seasonal illness and that a seven-day period of self-isolation was appropriate as a precaution.

"There was no recommendation that further testing would be necessary. The club is in regular contact with the relevant players, whose symptoms remain mild and self-manageable.

"In the current medical climate, the club is acutely aware of its responsibilities to all of its employees and has issued extensive internal advice consistent with current recommendations from the government and medical professionals on COVID-19 (coronavirus).

"All staff experiencing moderate symptoms of ill-health have been advised to stay at home, to contact NHS 111 and to follow their recommended advice."

Rodgers is hopeful Saturday's trip to Vicarage Road goes ahead as planned but is not a fan of matches being staged behind closed doors.

"It would be a shame [if the Watford game were to be postponed], but the public's health is the most important in all of this," he said.

"The game is all about the players and the fans and if you have one of those not there, it's obviously not the same."

Rodgers also confirmed right-back Ricardo Pereira will face around six months on the sidelines with an anterior cruciate ligament injury, while playmaker James Maddison is also out with a calf problem.

Leicester lie third in the Premier League with nine games of the season remaining.

 

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