NFL

Seahawks' DK Metcalf impresses on the track but misses out on Olympic trials

By Sports Desk May 09, 2021

Seattle Seahawks wide receiver DK Metcalf described the opportunity to race against world-class athletes as a blessing after his Olympic hopes seemingly came to an end on Sunday.

The 23-year-old competed in the 100 metres event at the USA Track and Field (USATF) Golden Games and Distance Open in California, part of the qualification process for this year's rescheduled Games in Tokyo.

Metcalf posted an impressive time of 10.36 seconds in his heat, but that was only good enough to finish ninth as he missed out on a place in the final of the event.

A time under 10.05s would have been enough to automatically qualify for the US Olympic track and field trials in Oregon next month.

"I'm just happy to be here, excited to have the opportunity to come out here and run against world-class athletes like this," Metcalf said in his post-race interview on Peacock.

"Just to test my speed up against world-class athletes like this. Like I said, to have the opportunity to come out here and run against these guys was just a blessing."

Metcalf had been a hurdler and a long jumper at high school before focusing on football in college at Ole Miss. He was selected by the Seahawks with the 64th pick in the 2019 draft.

After posting 58 receptions for 900 yards in his rookie season, he finished the 2020 campaign with 83 catches for 1,303 yards and 10 touchdowns, good enough to earn him a trip to the Pro Bowl.

"They do this for a living. It's very different from football speed, as I just realised," Metcalf, who was strong out of the blocks, added.

Seattle team-mate Russell Wilson was among those from the NFL to be impressed by Metcalf's performance, the quarterback tweeting: "Amazing Bro!"

Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes also praised the receiver, who admitted the focus will now switch from competing on the track back to his NFL career.

"10.36 is crazy tho [sic] at that size!! Mad respect!" Mahomes posted on Twitter.

Related items

  • Mahomes, Chiefs ready to start from scratch in training camp after Super Bowl disappointment Mahomes, Chiefs ready to start from scratch in training camp after Super Bowl disappointment

    For Patrick Mahomes and the Kansas City Chiefs, reminders of their blowout Super Bowl LV loss to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers have been everywhere. 

    From Tom Brady's trophy toss during the Bucs' boat parade to Thursday's unveiling of Tampa Bay's massive Super Bowl rings, the champs have stayed in the spotlight throughout the off-season. 

    With training camp finally set to begin next week, though, the Chiefs are ready to clear the slate and move on.

    "I think the best thing about getting to training camp is it all starts over," Mahomes said at a news conference Friday as the team's quarterbacks and rookies reported to camp.

    "No matter how you ended the year before, you have to go in with the mindset of starting from scratch. We’re excited to do that and try and make another run at it.”

    The Chiefs have made it to the final game two years in a row, with Mahomes taking MVP honors in their Super Bowl LIV triumph over the San Francisco 49ers. 

    To Mahomes, the path back to the Super Bowl starts immediately, not in the September 12 season opener against the Cleveland Browns. 

    "I think we’ve learned that if we put in the work now, that we’ll be where we want to be at the end of the season," he said.

    "It’s about putting in the work right now, day by day, getting better and better so that at the end of the year you have no regrets about what you did in the season.”

    Mahomes had surgery to repair a turf toe issue immediately following the Super Bowl but will be ready to go for training camp. 

    Head coach Andy Reid said his 25-year-old quarterback, already among the best in the league, has spent the off-season working to be even better and he expects more of the same in camp. 

    "He’s always looking for that next thing that makes him even better than what he is now, and that’s the part you love about him," Reid said. "He has that type of personality. He wants to be the best, and he’s not just talk."

    The Chiefs are one of a handful of NFL teams who spend training camp away from their team headquarters, setting up shop at Missouri Western State University about 60 miles north of Kansas City. 

    Reid said the more secluded location helps eliminate distractions and he looks forward to watching his team bond along the way. 

    "We come up, it’s a time for camaraderie and bringing things together as a team. It’s hard work. There are no shortcuts obviously," he said. 

    "We’re going to try to make sure we cover everything we possibly can, but there’s this concentration of football that you take in here.

    "You’re sleeping in a dorm, you’re eating over in the dorm and you’re doing all of that. You’re here and it’s football kind of 24/7 right now.”

    After months spent rehashing what went wrong in Tampa Bay, that probably is the best thing possible for the Chiefs. 

  • Jamaica 1500m runner Praught-Leer will compete at Olympics with torn meniscus Jamaica 1500m runner Praught-Leer will compete at Olympics with torn meniscus

     In just two days, team Jamaica has received news of two unexpected injury blows to start the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

    2018 Commonwealth Games steeplechase champion, Aisha Praught Leer, has revealed via social media that she injured her left knee in training on Sunday, which later turned out to be a torn meniscus.

    The athlete will, however, still attempt to compete at the Games after taking an injection to the joint.

    "I will line up in Tokyo.  When I arrive I will get fluid drained from my knee and take a cortisone injection (this is legal, and my surgeon understands and supports me in this)

    The unfortunate injury occurred during what she described as one of the ‘best workouts’ of her life.  The athlete explained that she felt excruciating pain as if something had torn.

    “I tore my meniscus (a complete, off the bone root tear) on Sunday at training—a freak, shocking accident. I heard and felt a painful pop doing a drill but then proceeded to do one of the best workouts of my life. On Wednesday I got an MRI, then sat in quiet disbelief with Joe Bosshard as the doctor told us I need surgery ASAP.”

    The always-smiling athlete is scheduled to compete in the 1500m that is set to get underway on Sunday, at 7:35 pm.  Naturally, she is heartbroken because she will not be able to compete at her maximum ability.

    “I want to keep believing in the possibility of achieving the wild dreams I store deep in my heart. The reality is they will not happen in Tokyo—running to my ability is simply not possible on a knee without stability. This is the most challenging reality I have faced in my career,” Praught Leer said.

    “We did nothing wrong. As I said, this was a freak accident. But now all of my silent work, the beautiful, hard-earned fitness, does not have a chance to see the light of day. The triumph I have visualized so vividly is—poof—gone in one step,” Leer lamented.

    Although she understands that unexpected injuries are a part of sports, it is still a tough reality for her to accept.

    “I understand this is sport—just sport. I know the truth that I am more than an athlete. But this sport means everything to me. This is my life’s work, my purpose, and my first true love. I am heartbroken.”

    The athlete, who created history, being the first Jamaican to win gold in the steeplechase event at the Commonwealth Games, insists she will be proud to represent the country despite not being in top shape. 

    “You will see me smiling in Tokyo with Jamaica on my chest because the honour of representing my country is one of the greatest I’ve had in my little life.”

    On Thursday, news broke that gymnast Danusia Francis had suffered an injury to her left knee, which later turned out to be a torn ACL.  Francis will not be able to compete in her events.  She will, however, symbolically take part in the Uneven Bars event but will not attempt a dismount.

     

     

     

  • Francis unsure of when she sustained competition-ending knee injury - remains proud to wear Jamaican flag Francis unsure of when she sustained competition-ending knee injury - remains proud to wear Jamaican flag

    Jamaica gymnast Danusia Francis is unsure of when she sustained a competition-ending knee injury, and will only be able to symbolically compete in Saturday’s competition, but insists she remains proud to represent the country regardless.

    The 27-year-old was diagnosed with a torn ACL on Friday and will now only take part in the Athletics Gymnastics Uneven Bars event at the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020.  Even so, the gymnast will not be able to fully compete as she will be unable to do a dismount routine.

     “I hope to do some sort of bar routine just to get a score on the board but without a dismount, it won’t be a competitive score, but I’ll be happy to see Jamaica represented at the Olympic Games and I still feel very proud to be wearing the Jamaican flag,” Francis told the press.

    “The knee, I think, is getting worse and worse, so I can’t really tell you the exact time when the ligament damage occurred, but I found out today what it actually was and it will drastically affect my competition, unfortunately.”

      The Artistic Gymnastics competition is set to start tomorrow with the Uneven Bars finals for women taking place on Sunday.  The athlete will miss out on competing on the Balance Beam, Floor Exercise, and Vault.

     The gymnast admits the injury had come as a huge blow.

    “I’m really upset to have hurt myself. I have been so prepared for this competition mentally and physically up to this point so to, at the last hurdle, be injured is disappointing. Luckily, the medics have taken really good care of me and I’m sure they will continue to do so.”

     

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.