NFL

Super Bowl Trophy makes a historic stop in Jamaica

By October 31, 2019

The Vince Lombardi Trophy will make a historic first appearance in Jamaica on Saturday, November 2.

The trophy will make a one-day stopover as part of VISA’s partnership with the Jamaica Food & Drink Festival.

It will be the first time that the trophy, more popularly known as the NFL Super Bowl Trophy, will be on display in Jamaica where the sport’s popularity has been steadily on the rise over the last decade or more.

Arranged by VISA, as part of its commitment to connect with consumers in the island, the Sterling silver trophy arrived in Jamaica on Friday, November 1 under heavy security. Before coming to Jamaica, it toured the USA, Europe and Latin America, including Mexico, Panama, Brazil, Costa Rica and Guatemala.

“This is the first time that the trophy will visit Jamaica.  We decided to bring it to the island because we want to continue providing access to exclusive opportunities to our Jamaican consumers, such as taking photographs with the NFL trophy,” said Waldemar Cordero, VISA’s Region Head of Central America and Caribbean Marketing.

The one-of-a-kind trophy, which is made for each Super Bowl, was created in 1966 by Tiffany & Company, from a sketch on a napkin drawn by Tiffany’s Vice President Oscar Riedner over lunch with NFL Commissioner Peter Rozelle.

The trophy is named in honour of NFL coach Vince Lombardi, who led the Green Bay Packers to victories in the first two Super Bowl games.

The NFL Trophy is awarded each year to the winning team of the National Football League’s championship game, the Super Bowl.

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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