Vuelta a Espana: Izagirre wins stage six as Roglic loses race lead to Carapaz

By Sports Desk October 25, 2020

Ion Izagirre claimed victory in a rain-soaked stage six of the Vuelta a Espana on a day that saw Richard Carapaz replace Primoz Roglic as the overall race leader.

Astana Pro Team rider Izagirre made his move in the final 3km of Sunday's climb to Formigal to finish 25 seconds ahead of Michael Woods and Rui Costa.

The 31-year-old timed his attack well, something brother and team-mate Gorka failed to do earlier in the race, as he added a fourth Grand Tour stage victory.

An eventful final climb also saw overnight leader Roglic lose pace with Carapaz, who finished 55 seconds behind Izagirre but still did enough to take the General Classification lead and the red jersey.

Roglic was visibly struggling with around 2km to go and Carapaz took full advantage with a late attack, although he did not have the legs to keep up with Hugh Carthy in the final stretch.

EF Pro Cycling's Carthy bridged the gap to the other contenders and moved into second place, with Roglic slipping to fourth behind Dan Martin.

"We have been working very well this week, we have been performing well, and today we had a go," said Carapaz, whose INEOS team-mate Tao Geoghegan Hart won the Giro d'Italia on Sunday. 

"We have done very well, and this is the reward for the whole team. We had more than one scare and that encouraged Movistar to pull in the end. 

"I knew the end of the stage and, to begin with, I let others who were interested do a bit. There were many attacks. 

"I had calculated the distance and I attacked at the right time. There is still a lot of the Vuelta to go and we are going to defend it - it is a luxury to be able to defend it."
 

STAGE RESULT

1. Ion Izaguirre (Astana Pro Team) 03:41:00
2. Michael Woods (EF Pro Cycling) +00:25
3. Rui Costa (UAE Team Emirates) +00:25
4. Rob Power (Team Sunweb) +00:27
5. Michael Valgren (NTT Pro Cycling) +00:27

CLASSIFICATION STANDINGS

General Classification

1. Richard Carapaz (INEOS Grenadiers) 24:34:39
2. Hugh Carthy (EF Pro Cycling) +00:18
3. Dan Martin (Israel Start-Up Nation) +00:20

Points Classification

1. Primoz Roglic (Jumbo-Visma) 79
2. Richard Carapaz (INEOS Grenadiers) 61
3. Dan Martin (Israel Start-Up Nation) 57

King of the Mountains

1. Tim Wellens (Lotto Soudal) 19
2. Richard Carapaz (INEOS Grenadiers) 18
3. Dan Martin (Israel Start-Up Nation) 16

What's next?

After a rest day on Monday, the riders return on Tuesday with stage seven and have two climbs to navigate of the Alto de Orduna, involving an inclination of 14 per cent. The final climb takes place 18km from the finish line in what could be a decisive stretch.

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