CARIFTA swimmers Sobers, Evans and Carter, hit Olympic 'B' standards

By April 11, 2021

The youth of the CARIFTA region were treated to an excellent performance by Alex Sobers of Barbados who hit three Tokyo Olympic B times at the ISCA International Senior Cup.

More B cuts were added on April 9, by former age-group stars Joanna Evans of The Bahamas and Dylan Carter of Trinidad and Tobago put down their long-course season markers before the Games in the Asian continent.

Joanna Evans, the fastest English speaking woman in the 200 freestyle from the CARIFTA region was on fire during the heats of the events at the 2021 TYR Pro Swim Series – Mission Viejo.

The meet that had heats in the evenings and finals in the mornings, saw the Bahamian speeding to 1:58.43, her fastest time in years.  It was also the second time that she has dipped under 1:59.

Her best time actually stands at 1:58.03 in a Championship record swim at the 2018 Central American and Caribbean Games. The Tokyo Olympic B time is 2:00.80. In the final, Longhorns Aquatics swimmer punched the clock in 1:59.41 for seventh overall.

Shortly afterwards in the 100-metre butterfly Team Elite’s Trinidad and Tobago star Dylan Carter clocked 52.94 in the heats, just outside his national record of 52.64 set at the 2019 US Open. The time was well under the Tokyo B time of 53.52.

He was also under the B time in the final when he touched sixth in 53.34.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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