'I want to be remembered as the greatest shooter ever' - Jhanielle Fowler

By December 03, 2019

After winning back-to-back Suncorp Super Netball League Player of the Year titles, Jamaica’s Jhanielle Fowler says she plans to improve even more as she wants to be remembered as the greatest shooter ever by the time she retires from the sport.

The 30-year-old Jamaican scored 709 goals from only 753 attempts, an astonishing 94 per cent accuracy while averaging 50 goals a game for the West Coast Fever, who somehow failed to capitalize, winning only two games, drawing six and losing nine this past season.

However, the adjudicators could ignore the obvious; Fowler was the best player in the league for a second year running. Fowler also finished second in rebounds pulling down 44.

Despite this latest accolade, the superstar shooter says she does not intend to rest on her laurels and plans to be even better in the years to come.

 “I want to grow more and excel more. I want to finish on top. When I retire, I want to be known as the greatest shooter ever. That is what I hope to achieve at the end of my career,” she told Sportsmax.TV.

“There is always room for improvement. I want to be even more dominant in the circle. I want to shoot at least 98 per cent at the end of the season and I want to build my repertoire, not only be a posting shooter even though my game has changed somewhat. I want to be more skilful in certain areas where they don’t expect a six-foot-five shooter to be skilful in.”

Fowler said it was an amazing feeling winning the Player if the Year title in consecutive years but said it was also humbling.

“Personally, I performed well because there things that I wanted to improve on this season which I did improve on. However, because my team did not end where we wanted to, I did not expect to be getting the MVP. I was not really rating my performance because it was possible there was more I could have done to help us get over the line a bit more but unfortunately we did not get over that line,” she said.

“Obviously, my input was great nonetheless so I am proud. It means a lot for my legacy because I am an import and when an import can come out and be MVP among such great Australian players it’s just amazing.”

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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