Avernell Modest is one of the best Bikini Fitness athletes Jamaica has ever had and she is expected to do well at the IFBB Elite Pro World Professional Championships in Tarragona, Spain, in November.

Jamaica international Michael Hector has officially completed a move from English Premier League (EPL) club Chelsea to Championship club Fulham but will be unable to play until the next transfer window.

The 27-year-old Reggae Boy joined the Blues in a surprise move on deadline day in 2015 but was immediately loaned back to Reading for the 2015-2016 campaign.

 The defender spent the next three seasons on loan at clubs like Eintracht Frankfurt, Hull City, and Sheffield Wednesday and never made an appearance for his parent club.  Although he cannot officially beginning playing for the club until January, Hector will join Fulham to immediately begin training with the squad.

“Although Michael can’t officially join our First Team until January, what’s important is he’s now a member of Fulham Football Club,” Fulham’s co-owner Tony Khan said.

“Michael will help us challenge for promotion and make us better in the second half of the season, at a time when depth, experience, and quality will be at a premium in the Championship. Come on Fulham!” he added.

He spent last season on loan at Sheffield Wednesday, playing in 37 Championship games for the Owls.

“It was an easy decision to make. My mum’s from Fulham, so it’s nice to join a club that some of my family support,” Hector told Fulham’s official club website.

Hector, who was close to completing a deal to join the club on deadline day before it fell through, signed a two and a half year contract.

 

 

One of the heavyweights in the Concacaf Nations League, the Jamaica’s men’s national team will be one of the favorites to win their group in League B.

Theodore Whitmore’s side finished Concacaf Nations League Qualifying in eighth place and were denied participation in League A only by goal difference.

Jamaica won their first three qualifying matches by a combined score of 12-1 but had their attack shut down on their final matchday.

The team’s only defeat in CNLQ came away at El Salvador, 2-0, a match their foes needed to secure the final spot in the Gold Cup.

Jamaica’s run in qualifying saw them secure a spot in the Concacaf Gold Cup for themselves and were later named as one of the tournament’s co-hosts.

Hosting a Gold Cup match for the first time, Jamaica opened the tournament with a win against Honduras. The next two matches ended in draws but were enough to win the group.

A 1-3 loss to the United States in the semifinal denied the team a third consecutive final.

Jamaica now turn the page and begin play in the Nations League, drawn in Group C along with Guyana, Antigua and Barbuda and Aruba.

The Reggae Boyz open at home against Antigua and Barbuda before traveling to Guyana to kickoff Nations League play on Friday.

In other games, from League B tomorrow, Aruba play Guyana and Montserrat host the Dominican Republic.

Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) president Michael Ricketts insists the association was taken aback by the threatened protest action of members of the women’s national team, who are still owed money from the Women's World Cup campaign.

Several senior members of the country’s history-making World Cup squad, including Bunny Shaw, Havana Solaun, Toriana Patterson, Allyson Swaby and Lauren Silver, took to social media to air their grouses.

Under a banner declaring No Pay, No Play, the girls posted:

“This is an issue that goes simply beyond “getting paid.” It’s about the girls following in our footsteps. It’s about leaving something better off than when you found it. We signed contracts and have yet to be paid.”

  

According to Ricketts, however, the JFF had been in contact with members of the team regarding FIFA’s late disbursement of funds owed to the JFF, which prevented the payments being made on time“We have been in contact with the girls.  We wrote to them last week expressing our dissatisfaction with how things have unfolded.  Up until now, we have not yet received funds from FIFA,” Ricketts said in an interview with SportsMax Zone.
“We advised the girls that FIFA had indicated to us that the money would be made available at the end of September.  The World Cup ended in July, we certainly thought that we would have got that money, maybe a month thereafter,” he added.

“We wrote to FIFA on the 16th of July making inquiries about the payment and we were advised then that the money would not be paid until the end of September.  We wrote to the girls and we apologized profusely for it and asked that they bear with us and try and understand the situation.”

Ricketts revealed that the original plan was to pay the team at the end of August and that the organisation had made arrangements to pay the women’s team half of what was owed to them.  According to the JFF boss, the process for that payment, which began last week is expected to be completed later this week.

“We really don’t want to be in a fight with the girls.  We would love to amicably and quickly settle this issue so we can go on with the business of football. I honestly thought that they would have understood the situation.”

Jerome Taylor will replace Pakistan’s Amad Butt in the Jamaica Tallawahs squad for the start of the 2019 Hero Caribbean Premier League (CPL) season.

 

Several members of Jamaica’s Reggae Girlz history-making World Cup squad including Bunny Shaw, Havana Solaun, Toriana Patterson, Allyson Swaby and Lauren Silver, have declared that they will not play another match for Jamaica until they are paid money they are owed from their world cup campaign.

Each has posted a No Pay No Play poster on their Instagram pages stating their position.

Under a banner declaring No Pay, No Play, the girls posted:

“This is an issue that goes simply beyond “getting paid.” It’s about the girls following in our footsteps. It’s about leaving something better off than when you found it. We signed contracts and have yet to be paid.

“The Reggae Girlz are the first Caribbean team ever to qualify for a World Cup. The hours of hard work and dedication put in by this team doesn’t have a monetary value. It’s about so much more than money. Women’s soccer has taken a back seat for too long. It’s time to take a stand.

“For this reason, I, along with my teammates won't be participating in any tournaments until being paid,” the post said.

In response, Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) President Michael Ricketts said he does not know what would have triggered this latest protest from the Reggae Girls. The players are owed US$120,000, Ricketts said, and half that amount was transferred through Sagicor Bank last week.

In the meantime, team manager Jean Nelson had been in communication with the players informing them that some money had been transferred to their accounts ad that the balance would be paid once they received US$750,000 earned at the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup the end of September.

FIFA, Ricketts said, is to pay over that sum at the end of the month.

However, the players insist they have not been paid.

“My teammates and I have not received any money. Our agreement ended on August 30 and today is September 2 and there is nothing pending,” Lauren Silver confirmed, indicating that the players had formed their own union in anticipation of something like this happening.

“We as a group just always wanted to have a line of communication open with each other. Like most companies have a union but since it was a repetitive action, we as a team have been trying to work together more.”

She did acknowledge that Jean Nelson did communicate with them but the bottom line is that they still have not been paid.

“Jean has communicated with us to the best of her ability but at the end of the day she is not responsible for our salary,” she said.

 

 

United Kingdom-based players Daniel Johnson and Bobby Reid have received maiden calls to Jamaica’s Reggae Boyz squad for their CONCACAF Nations League group games against Antigua and Barbuda early next month.

Asafa Powell is looking further and further away from the heady form that saw him set two world records over 100 metres after the ‘Sub-10 King’ could only manage a seventh place finish at a track meet in Madrid, Spain on Sunday. 

Dr. Emir Crowne, the sports lawyer selected to represent Briana Williams is seeking a speedy resolution to the case against the athlete in the relation to the diuretic found in her urine sample at the Jamaican national championships in June.

Guyana defeated Jamaica in a closely contested final to win the 2019 Caribbean Area Squash Association’s Senior Championships wrapped up over the weekend.

French attacking player Viviane Asseyi is confident Jamaica international Khadijah ‘Bunny’ Shaw is set to have a major impact for Division 1 Féminine club Bordeaux after netting twice on her official debut.

The 22-year-old Shaw, who signed a two-year deal with the French club just ahead of the FIFA Women’s World Cup, scored twice in a 4-1 win for Bordeaux over Fleury on her official league debut on Saturday.

“For me, she’s a great player.  Because of her size, she already provides a good point of support for us.  She has special physical and technical quality,” Asseyi said.

“Physically, she’s a monster. We see it in training, she moves everyone.  She’s a very good player and good for us,  I know she’ll do well with us.”

In Saturday’s route, Shaw scored in the 75th and 90th minute.  For Jamaica, the player has scored an impressive 31 goal in 24 appearances.  Bordeaux, who finished fourth in the league last season, will be hoping Shaw’s presence will lead the team to a top-two finish, which will see them qualify for the Women's UEFA Champions League next season.

 

Jamaica’s delegation to the 2019 Para Pan American Games was greeted with a welcome ceremony when they arrived at the athletes’ village in Lima, Peru on Thursday afternoon.

Dressed in black and gold with black caps the members of the delegation led by Chef de Mission, Leonie Phinn sang the national anthem and Bob Marley's "One Love" and announced their arrival with "What a gwaan, wi strong".

The receptive crowd waved miniature flags in return.

Chef de Mission Phinn presented former Peruvian athlete, Giorgio Mautino, the Mayor of the Village, with a bag in the colours of the national flag and which contained local spices, Blue Mountain coffee in addition to Jamaican clothing and headgear.

Phinn thanked Mautino for the tremendous hospitality extended to the Jamaican delegation and assured him that she was confident that the Games would be successful.

“Welcome ceremonies are always somewhat emotional for they remind you that the journey for the country now begins and the hoisting of the flag and the National Anthem embody reverence and pride, the feeling of which cannot be underscored,” said JPA President Christopher Samuda.

The Para Pan American village accommodates more than 4,000 para-athletes and officials from the Americas and Caribbean.

Local schoolboy football organisers Inter-Secondary School Sports Association (ISSA) announced plans to yet again re-evaluate the structure of its historic Walker and Ben Francis knockout competitions, which had come in for some criticism last season.

The plans were announced as the details of the 2019-2020 season were revealed at the official competitions' launch at the Terra Nova All Suite Hotel, in St Andrew on Wednesday. The 2019 season is scheduled to kick off on Saturday, September 7 with seven Manning Cup games and 31 daCosta Cup matches.

Digicel, in its second stint as title sponsors, last year announced that the telecommunications firm and entertainment provider would invest $75 million over three years in the urban area Manning Cup and Walker Cup Knockout competitions. Wisynco, then, announced a sponsorship package of close to $100 million, over the three years, in the rural area daCosta Cup and Ben Francis Knockout.

The 2019 season will see 129 teams competing for the six trophies. In addition to the Manning Cup and daCosta Cup, teams will also compete for the Walker Cup Knockout, Ben Francis Knockout Cup, Champions Cup, and the season-ending Olivier Shield.

The Ben Francis and Walker Cup competitions were labelled the "losers cup" as last year's format prevented top schools from competing.

Linvern Wright, who announced the structure of the competitions, pointed out that ISSA would not revert to the original format of the Walker Cup and the Ben Francis Cup.

He said, "last year we were experimenting. We listened and have made changes but will not go back to the original formats.

"The commitment continues to ensure that our players are rested for at least 72 hours between games."

For the Ben Francis Cup Knockout, teams which placed second and third in the four respective daCosta Cup quarter-final groups will contest this competition.

Last year, teams which ended third and fourth in the four respective daCosta Cup quarter-final groups contested the Ben Francis, which was a major change compared to the previous year when only the top four daCosta Cup teams competed for the title.

The Ben Francis Knockout Cup will be played in three sets of matchups in three rounds, with the second round being the semi-finals and the third round, the final. 

In the Walker Cup competition, all teams knocked out in the Round of 16 home-and-away second round tie of the Manning Cup will be involved in a playoff, with the winners matching up in a subsequent round with the third and fourth place teams in each of the two Manning Cup quarterfinal groups for four matchups.

The winners of each of those games will qualify for the semi-finals. 

Last season, the Walker Cup competition comprised the eight losers of the Manning Cup Round of 16 home-and-away knockouts;  a major change compared to former years when the seven preliminary round group winners and the best second-place teams earned the right to contest that competition.

SportsMax will be media partners and will broadcast selected matches live throughout the season.

 

Jamaica sprinter Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has targeted adding another feat to an already impressive resume and that is becoming a member of the sub-22 seconds club.

Despite being better known over her exploits over the half the distance, where she has claimed numerous world and Olympic titles, Fraser-Pryce has also proven to be more than competitive over the distance. 

An impressive performance over the half-lap event was part of a memorable triple gold medal haul at the Moscow World Championships.  With a personal best of 22.09 set in London, in 2012, Fraser-Pryce is yet to crack the 22-second mark.  The feat has been achieved by five Jamaican women to date Merlene Ottey, Elaine Thompson, Grace Jackson, Veronica Campbell-Brown and Juliet Cuthbert.

Fraser-Pryce recently completed in the event at Birmingham Diamond League where she finished in third spot behind Shaunae Miller-Uibo and Britain’s Dina Asher-Smith.

“One of my dreams, one of my goals is to get below 22 seconds.  It would be an honour to get below 22 seconds,” Fraser-Pryce told Nuffin Long Athletics.

“I’m not the best 200m runner but I love the opportunities I get to run the 200m.  I’m one of those persons that doesn’t back from anything unless you give me a 400m then don’t want to run it.”

Retired Jamaica international Jamal Campbell-Ryce has embarked on a career in coaching with the Colchester United under-23 team.

The 36-year-old winger, who made some 18 appearances for the Jamaica national team, is expected to work with the club’s youth players who he will mentor on a one and one basis.

Jon de Souza the club’s director of performance has tipped the Jamaican to have a positive impact on future generations.

"Jamal will be joining us as an U23s player/coach, working in training with the U18s and U23s, to play in the U23s fixtures and to mentor players on a one to one basis,” he told the club’s official website.

"He was a flair-based forward in his career, and we believe that they are often the type of players who need help within our squad to develop the right application and desire to continue to progress,” he added.

"Through his career, Jamal has learned a lot and knows that, in that position and at that young age, you have to learn to do a lot more off the ball and to apply yourself fully on and off the pitch to end up having a long life in the game.”

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