Andy Murray has condemned Nick Kyrgios' latest costly meltdown at the Western & Southern Open and hopes his close friend can "figure it out".

The temperamental Australian swore at Fergus Murphy and called him the worst umpire in the game during a second-round defeat against Karen Khachanov, less than a fortnight after winning the Citi Open in Washington.

Kyrgios also smashed two rackets in an off-court outburst as he lost his cool in Cincinnati on Wednesday, the unruly behaviour costing him fines amounting to $113,000 (£93,254).

Murray said the world number 27 was out of order and hopes he can change his ways.

The Briton told BBC Sport: "It wasn't good, and I felt for Fergus as he shouldn't have to put up with that.

"I chatted to [Kyrgios] a little bit [on Wednesday] night after the match.

"It's obviously up to him, and I think for the most part a couple of weeks ago in Washington, he did a good job of helping himself and using the crowd.

"But obviously this week, he went back to what he was doing before. You just hope he will figure it out, because a week like in Washington is really good for tennis, but [Wednesday] night isn't.

"Hopefully he gets it figured out."

Nick Kyrgios has been fined $113,000 and warned he could face a ban on top of that initial punishment after his ill-mannered exit from the Western & Southern Open.

The Australian hurled abuse at umpire Fergus Murphy, describing him as "the worst, hands down", during a second-round defeat to Russian Karen Khachanov.

At one stage, Kyrgios violently smashed two rackets away from the gaze of the crowd in Cincinnati as he took a bathroom break, without permission from Murphy, between the second and third sets.

He has had previous run-ins with Murphy and called him "a tool" at the end of Wednesday's match.

The ATP, which runs men's tennis, came down hard on Kyrgios and issued a succession of fines for unsportsmanlike conduct, made up of four separate $20,000 penalties and one for $5,000.

He was given a further $20,000 punishment for verbal abuse, a $5,000 penalty for an audible obscenity and a $3,000 fine for leaving the court without permission.

Kyrgios, who was handed a ban from the tour for eight tournament weeks in late 2016, could find himself suspended again over his conduct.

It could mean the volatile 24-year-old's place at the upcoming US Open is at risk.

In a statement received by Omnisport, the ATP said: "In addition to the on-site fines announced today the ATP is looking further into what happened during and immediately after the match to see if additional action is warranted under the player major offence section of the code.

"That could result in an additional fine and/or suspension."

Kyrgios, who won the Washington Open title earlier this month, lost in three sets to Khachanov.

Nick Kyrgios believes his success at the Citi Open demonstrated how he can compete at the highest level, having lost faith in himself at times during his eventful career.

The Australian secured his second ATP 500 title of the year by beating Daniil Medvedev 7-6 (8-6) 7-6 (7-4) in Sunday's final in Washington, adding to his victory at the Mexican Open back in March.

Kyrgios has often been the focus of attention for his on-court behaviour, including walking off during a match in Rome this year after throwing a table, while he also created a stir with his comments regarding "cringeworthy" Novak Djokovic and "super salty" Rafael Nadal during a podcast appearance.

However, the 24-year-old's successful run on American soil will propel him into the world's top 30, though he dedicated the triumph to those who have stuck by him during the low points.

"This has honestly been one of my favourite weeks of my life. I've made massive strides," Kyrgios said.

"I've had people behind me, backing me, and they never lost faith in me even when I lost faith in myself.

"This week means a lot. It's great to get the win, but I've proved to myself and the people backing me that I can still produce at the highest level."

Andy Murray, a man who knows about the need to control your emotions while on court, feels the key for Kyrgios is to stay focused as he looks to make the most of his obvious talent.

Asked by the ATP Tour about his good friend, Murray said:  "Everyone matures at different ages. Some people are ready when they are 18, 19 to deal with what comes with being a top athlete and some people aren't ready and it takes them a bit of time.

"I'm hoping that with time Nick will learn and be better for it.

"When he's engaged in tennis and wants to play he's brilliant for the game. And when he isn't giving his best effort and misbehaving, that's not what people want to see. He needs to find that balance."

Kyrgios is next in action in Montreal, where he faces Murray's fellow Brit Kyle Edmund in his first match.

Nick Kyrgios claimed his second ATP 500 title of the year after overcoming Daniil Medvedev in the Citi Open final.

Australian entertainer Kyrgios outlasted world number 10 Medvedev 7-6 (8-6) 7-6 (7-4) in Washington on Sunday.

The victory added to Kyrgios' Mexican Open triumph earlier this year, while it was his sixth career ATP trophy as he improved to 5-1 against top-10 players this year – the best record on tour.

Kyrgios put on a show against top seed Stefanos Tsitsipas in the semi-final and while Sunday's decider did not reach those lofty heights, there was still plenty of quality.

The 24-year-old – who never faced a break point and hit 18 aces – and Medvedev went toe-to-toe in an evenly contested opening set.

Medvedev only lost one service point before the first-set tie-break, which he had led 4-1 and 5-2 before Kyrgios stormed back to win it.

Kyrgios took a medical time-out for a back issue having stretched during changeovers towards the latter stages of the first set.

As the second set wore on, Kyrgios showed no signs of the back problem and like he did against Tsitsipas – the former world number 13 asked a fan where he should serve before delivering another ace out wide to prevail in the tie-break.

Nick Kyrgios put on a show as he prevailed against top seed Stefanos Tsitsipas in an entertaining ATP Citi Open semi-final.

Kyrgios saved a match point in a third-set tie-break to see off Greek star Tsitsipas 6-4 3-6 7-6 (9-7) in a Washington thriller on Saturday.

Much was expected from the blockbuster meeting and it lived up to the hype – Kyrgios producing underarm serves and even consulting a fan on match point as he booked a spot in the final.

Kyrgios, who led 5-1 in the final-set tie-break, even delivered shoes to Tsitsipas in the wildly entertaining contest in front of a sell-out crowd after the world number six struggled to find a spare pair.

Seeking his sixth career ATP title and second of the year, Kyrgios improved to 4-1 against top-10 players this season – the best record on tour in 2019.

Kyrgios, who won the Mexican Open in March, will face third seed Daniil Medvedev in Sunday's decider in the American capital.

Medvedev eased past lucky loser Peter Gojowczyk 6-2 6-2 as the Russian reached his eighth ATP final, with a fifth title up for grabs.

Stefanos Tsitsipas and Nick Kyrgios will meet in a blockbuster Citi Open semi-final after straight-sets wins on Friday.

Tsitsipas, the top seed at the ATP 500 event, ran away with a 7-5 6-0 victory over Frenchman Benoit Paire in their quarter-final.

The Greek star is into his seventh semi-final of the year and is set to rise into the world's top five after his run in Washington.

Tsitsipas' win over Paire was not without some controversy, with the 10th seed unhappy with the 20-year-old needing to change shoes early in the second set.

In what shapes as an entertaining last-four clash, Tsitsipas will face Kyrgios, with the pair having played doubles together in Washington.

Kyrgios' fine run continued with an impressive 6-3 6-3 victory over lucky loser Norbert Gombos.

In the other semi-final, Daniil Medvedev will take on Peter Gojowczyk.

Russian third seed Medvedev got past sixth seed Marin Cilic 6-4 7-6 (9-7) and lucky loser Gojowczyk upset Kyle Edmund 6-3 4-6 6-3.

In the doubles, brothers Andy and Jamie Murray bowed out in the quarter-finals.

Stefanos Tsitsipas advanced to the Citi Open quarter-finals and the in-form top seed was joined by Marin Cilic and Daniil Medvedev.

Tsitsipas was too good for Australian Jordan Thompson, prevailing 6-3 7-6 (7-4) to book a spot in the last eight on Thursday.

Greek star Tsitsipas saved a set point in the second set as he earned a clash with 10th seed Benoit Paire in Washington.

"It's very pleasing knowing that I can be mature and handle those situations very bravely, so I'm really happy with that," said Tsitsipas.

"I showed character out there. I played heroic tennis, I would say, in those crucial moments. That was very nice to see."

Paire – who fired down 12 aces and did not drop serve – defeated fifth seed John Isner 7-6 (7-3) 6-3 at the ATP 500 tournament.

Former US Open champion Cilic beat ninth seed Felix Auger-Aliassime 6-3 6-4 to reach the Washington quarters.

Auger-Aliassime's 11th double fault of the match allowed sixth seed Cilic to move through, with Medvedev waiting in the next round.

Medvedev – the third seed – saw off local favourite Frances Tiafoe 6-2 7-5.

Elsewhere, eighth seed Milos Raonic was stunned 6-4 6-4 by Peter Gojowczyk, Kyle Edmund rallied past Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 4-6 6-3 6-4, Norbert Gombos trumped Miomir Kecmanovic 1-6 6-3 7-6 (7-4) and Nick Kyrgios was a 6-2 7-5 victor against Yoshihito Nishioka.

Stefanos Tsitsipas and Nick Kyrgios moved into the Citi Open third round thanks to straight-sets wins on Wednesday.

Tsitsipas, the top seed, brushed past wildcard Tommy Paul 6-3 7-5 in their second-round clash in Washington.

The Greek star converted three of his eight break points to set up a last-16 meeting with Australian Jordan Thompson.

Thompson produced one of the upsets of the day, beating 14th seed Jan-Lennard Struff 6-7 (8-10) 6-4 7-5.

Kyrgios' run also continued, the Australian serving 24 aces in a 6-4 7-6 (7-5) victory over French 11th seed Gilles Simon.

Next up for Kyrgios is Yoshihito Nishioka, who edged seventh seed David Goffin 6-7 (5-7) 6-2 7-6 (7-5) after two hours, 40 minutes.

Of the 10 seeds in action, Simon, Goffin and Struff were three of five to make exits.

Pierre-Hugues Herbert was edged by Miomir Kecmanovic 3-6 6-4 7-6 (7-5) and Atlanta champion and last year's runner-up Alex de Minaur went down to lucky loser Peter Gojowczyk 6-3 7-6 (8-6).

Three-time runner-up John Isner cruised past Hubert Hurkacz 6-4 6-4, 2014 champion Milos Raonic beat Tim Smyczek 6-1 6-4 and Felix Auger-Aliassime edged Reilly Opelka 6-4 3-6 6-4.

Benoit Paire survived against Marc Polmans with a 6-3 6-7 (5-7) 7-6 (7-5) win and lucky loser Norbert Gombos overcame Adrian Mannarino 6-4 7-6 (11-9).

Meanwhile, in doubles action, brothers Andy and Jamie Murray got through their opener by beating Nicolas Mahut and Edouard Roger-Vasselin.

Marin Cilic claimed a much-needed win in the Citi Open second round, while Jo-Wilfried Tsonga caused an upset on Tuesday.

Cilic, yet to hit top form this year, battled past Marius Copil 7-6 (7-4) 7-6 (7-4) to reach the last 16 at the ATP 500 event in Washington.

The Croatian sixth seed and 2014 US Open champion improved to just a 12-10 win-loss record this year thanks to the hard-fought victory.

The only seed to fall on Tuesday was Karen Khachanov, who went down to Tsonga.

Tsonga served 13 aces in a 6-4 2-6 7-5 victory over Khachanov, the second seed losing to the Frenchman for the third time in as many meetings.

Daniil Medvedev, Kyle Edmund and Frances Tiafoe joined Cilic and Tsonga in the third round.

Medvedev eased past wildcard Bjorn Fratangelo 6-3 6-4, Edmund crushed Lloyd Harris 6-1 6-4 and Tiafoe was too good for Alexander Bublik 6-1 7-6 (7-5).

Meanwhile, Jack Sock's wait for a first singles win of the year continues after losing 7-5 6-3 to Jordan Thompson in the first round.

Nick Kyrgios sent down 15 aces on his way to a 7-5 6-4 win over qualifier Thai-Son Kwiatkowski, Reilly Opelka edged Christopher Eubanks 6-4 7-6 (7-3) and Yoshihito Nishioka was untroubled by Dan Evans in a 6-4 6-1 victory.

Peter Gojowczyk and Miomir Kecmanovic also advanced after wins over Andrey Rublev and Alexei Popyrin respectively.

Frenchman Jo-Wilfried Tsonga celebrated his first victory at the ATP Citi Open after defeating Brayden Schnur en route to the second round.

Tsonga – the 2008 Australian Open runner-up – topped Canadian Schnur 6-4 7-6 (7-2) in Washington on Monday.

It meant Tsonga achieved a career first, having never won at the ATP 500 event in his 16-year career, with his only other Citi Open match resulting in defeat in 2009.

Tsonga, who improved to 22-12 for the year, will face second seed Karen Khachanov for a place in the third round.

Tommy Paul beat Denis Kudla 6-0 6-4 to set up a second-round clash with top seed Stefanos Tsitsipas, who was busy on Monday.

Tsitsipas and Australian star Nick Kyrgios teamed up on the doubles court for the first time, but they lost to top seeds Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah 6-3 3-6 10-5.

Elsewhere in the singles, 2016 finalist Ivo Karlovic was beaten by wildcard Bjorn Fratangelo 6-4 6-7 (14-16) 7-6 (7-5), Adrian Mannarino topped Ilya Ivashka 7-6 (7-3) 6-3 and Tim Smyczek was a 6-4 6-4 winner over Matthew Ebden.

Alexander Bublik claimed a 7-6 (7-5) 6-3 victory against Bradley Klahn, Malek Jaziri lost 6-2 6-4 to Marc Polmans, Hubert Hurkacz was too good for Donald Young 6-1 6-4, Lloyd Harris outlasted Ricardas Berankis 4-6 6-3 6-1, while Marius Copil triumphed 6-1 5-7 6-3 over Mikael Torpegaard.

At the Los Cabos Open, Thanasi Kokkinakis secured his first tour-level win since the 2018 Miami Open in March with a 6-4 6-4 victory against Maxime Janvier.

Marcel Granollers, Ernests Gulbis, Mikhail Kukushkin and Prajnesh Gunneswaran also advanced at the ATP 250 event in Los Cabos, Mexico.

Nick Kyrgios said he wanted to hit Rafael Nadal "square in the chest" after crushing a forehand into the Spaniard during his Wimbledon loss.

Nadal closed out a hard-fought 6-3 3-6 7-6 (7-5) 7-6 (7-3) victory over Kyrgios in an entertaining second-round clash on Thursday.

But the Spanish 18-time grand slam champion appeared to be annoyed when Kyrgios blasted a forehand into him from behind the baseline in the third set, winning the point and opting not to apologise.

Kyrgios, 24, stood by his decision not to apologise to Nadal for the incident.

"Why would I apologise? I mean, the dude has got how many slams? How much money in the bank account?" the Australian told a news conference.

"I think he can take a ball to the chest, bro. I'm not going to apologise to him at all."

Asked if he aimed at Nadal, Kyrgios responded: "Yeah, I was going for him. Yeah, I wanted to hit him square in the chest. Like, he's got decent hands."

Nadal, who will face Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in the third round, accused Kyrgios of playing dangerously by hitting the blistering forehand.

"Honestly, it's not about what I feel or what I don't feel. Honestly, it's about we are in a game that the history of this sport is about respect and is about playing fair during the whole time," he said.

"I don't say Nick does this stuff to bother the opponent, but it's true that sometimes he's dangerous. When he hit the ball like this, it's dangerous. It's not dangerous for me, it's dangerous for a line referee, dangerous for a crowd. When you hit the ball like this, you don't know where the ball goes.

"I know he's a big talented player, but I am a professional player, too. I know when you hit this kind of ball, the ball can go anywhere. This time the ball went in, almost hit me, no problem. I am professional, so I know how to avoid this.

"But another one, the ball goes straight to the back. So [it could] have been a dangerous moment for the line umpire. That ball hits an eye or something like this, it's a problem. That's it.

"It's not about I am angry about him at all. It's about I want to play a match of tennis. Sometimes it's difficult."

Rafael Nadal has no doubt about Nick Kyrgios' talent but questioned his hunger after the Australian gave the two-time Wimbledon champion a Centre Court scare on Thursday.

Spaniard Nadal needed four sets to get past Kyrgios in the second round, with a gripping encounter seeing the challenger seemingly attempt to wind up both his opponent and umpire Damien Dumusois, who he later described as "horrendous".

Still, Kyrgios managed to combine his antics with a superb display that could easily have been rewarded with victory.

Yet Nadal pointed out how the 24-year-old does not always approach matches with the same level of determination, attributing to his failure to compete consistently at the highest level.

"He's a very top, talented player," Nadal told a news conference. "But there is a lot of important things that you need to do to become a champion, no? He has a lot of good ingredients.

"But, of course, what remains an important one sometimes is the love, the passion for this game. Without really loving this game that much, it is difficult to achieve important things.

"Anyway, with his talent and with his serve, he can win a grand slam, of course. He has the talent to do it. It is true that things can be completely different for him if he wants to play all the matches the same way that he tried today.

"But if you see the first round against Jordan Thompson, he was able to win the match, but the intensity on court, the way that he played, the way that he was focused, was different than today.

"He likes to play in these kind of matches. But to win important things, you don't need to play against the top players, you need to play against other players that are so good, too."

It was an assessment Kyrgios accepted was fair, admitting he is not always the "most professional guy".

"I know what I'm capable of. It just depends. I'm a great tennis player, but I don't do the other stuff," he said. "I'm not the most professional guy. I won't train day in, day out. I won't show up every day.

"So there's a lot of things I need to improve on to get to that level that Rafa brings, Novak [Djokovic], Roger [Federer] have been doing for so long. It just depends how bad I want it.

"But, no, at the moment, I don't think I can contend for a grand slam."

Rafael Nadal savoured a hard-fought victory over Nick Kyrgios on Centre Court in a Wimbledon match full of needle.

Australian Kyrgios recently described his Spanish rival as "super salty", adding extra spice to a second-round clash that saw both players show their frustration at times.

Kyrgios became fed up with umpire Damien Dumusois, engaging in a running conversation that began with complaints about Nadal taking too long between points and culminated in describing the official as "a disgrace".

Two-time former champion Nadal eventually won through 6-3 3-6 7-6 (7-5) 7-6 (7-3) and celebrated extravagantly.

He followed Roger Federer, a 6-1 7-6 (7-3) 6-2 winner over Britain's Jay Clarke, in reaching the last-32 stage.

Japan's Kei Nishikori took down another British hope in Cameron Norrie, administering a clinical 6-4 6-4 6-0 lesson, while Italian seeds Matteo Berrettini and Fabio Fognini also prevailed.

American ninth seed John Isner was edged out in five sets by Kazakhstan's Mikhail Kukushkin, though, and former Wimbledon finalist Marin Cilic also exited, losing to Portugal's Joao Sousa.

 

EVANS, NO HE'S NOT MISERABLE NOW...

The tears Dan Evans shed after sinking seeded Georgian Nikoloz Basilashvili were ones of joy and relief rather than sorrow. On No. 2 Court, Briton Evans won through in straight sets, with his first Wimbledon campaign since 2016 going to plan so far. Evans has made a terrific comeback after serving a ban for recreational drug use, and his attitude, questioned so often down the years, has been spot on.

Just 14 months ago, Evans had no ranking and now he is up to 61 in the world, with plenty of climbing still to be achieved.

"Obviously I just want to do well at this tournament," he said, explaining the emotional reaction. "It was a goal to be in the main draw here. I did that. Obviously I missed out the last few years. To be into the third round is great for me. That was all really, you know.

"A lot of my friends were here, people who have helped me so much. [It] just got the better of me today. There's plenty more tennis to be played in this tournament, so I won't be resting on that win."

 

TOUCHY SUBJECT FOR TSONGA

Jo-Wilfried Tsonga needed an hour and 46 minutes to get past Lithuanian Ricardas Berankis, almost twice as long as it took him to beat Bernard Tomic in round one.

Tsonga was asked for his reaction to Tomic being fined his entire tournament winnings of £45,000, after being found to have failed to "meet the required professional standards" during their one-sided contest.

And the Frenchman was not happy, hinting he felt the fine implied his own performance was not a factor in Tomic losing so emphatically.

"That's touchy," said Tsonga. "They will do that with him and not with others? And I think it's a little bit too much. I will say it's also, for me, it's like what I did was not win. It's like [I] was just here and I just won because they said he didn't play enough."

Asked if the size of the fine devalued his victory, Tsonga said: "A little bit."

 

COCO TIME FOR FEDERER

Federer revealed he has spoken to WTA officials about the limitations imposed on young players, who are restricted in the number of tournaments they can contest.

Cori 'Coco' Gauff has caught the eye with a run to Wimbledon's third round but can only play a limited season on tour, with the WTA keen to phase the introduction of youngsters to the tour.

"I understand the rule completely that they want the young players not to play too much," Federer said. "I've told the WTA they should loosen up the rules. I loved seeing [Martina] Hingis doing what she did at a young age."

Federer suggested tennis greats such as Martina Navratilova could mentor the youngsters, adding: I don't have the perfect solution. I see why they did it [placed the restrictions], because we've had the history of some tough parents out there. But at the same time you're also increasing the pressure for that player each week to produce."

Rafael Nadal came through a gruelling second-round clash with Nick Kyrgios in four sets to continue his bid for a third title at Wimbledon.

The world number two - the third seed at the All England Club - prevailed 6-3 3-6 7-6 (7-5) 7-6 (7-3) but will hope to avoid too many more days like this one.

Kyrgios, who was pictured in a local pub late on Wednesday night, initially enjoyed playing the clown as the pair shared the first two sets, before he piled the pressure on Nadal in the next two.

Nadal was good enough to come out on top yet needed a pair of tie-breaks in front of an engrossed crowd on Centre Court.

The charismatic Kyrgios had outlined his aim to "have some fun" against Nadal and, despite trailing early, he certainly did that.

Nadal's breakthrough arrived when an underhit 'tweener' set him up to smash into the lead, but Kyrgios had the crowd on their feet when an underarm serve kept him in the set.

The Spaniard passionately celebrated when he wrapped up an opener in which Kyrgios had repeatedly complained to the umpire of his opponent's failure to be ready to receive serve.

But the highly motivated Kyrgios sensationally broke Nadal at the start of the second and then brilliantly battled to a subsequent hold.

Another underarm serve this time angered the fans, bringing loud jeers that prompted a Kyrgios shrug, and Nadal was level with a break to love.

Kyrgios was given a warning as he again implored the umpire to punish Nadal's poor timekeeping, yet he broke back as he levelled the match at a set apiece.

A tense third set stayed on serve all the way through to a tie-break, where Nadal wrong-footed Kyrgios for the crucial first mini-break as he edged back in front.

The fourth went the same way and, unfortunately for Kyrgios, had the same result, the Australian failing to recover after horribly miscuing a simple volley on the first point of the tie-break.

Rafael Nadal set up an eagerly-awaited Wimbledon showdown with Nick Kyrgios and Roger Federer recovered from a shaky start to reach the second round, but Sam Querrey knocked Dominic Thiem out on day two.

Nadal was labelled "super salty" by Kyrgios before the Spaniard peppered his opponents at the French Open, winning the title for a 12th time at Roland Garros last month.

Third seed Nadal eased to a 6-3 6-1 6-3 victory over Yuichi Sugita on No.1 Court on Tuesday and will now face controversial Australian Kyrgios, who got past compatriot Jordan Thompson in five sets.

Eight-time champion Federer came from a set down to defeat Lloyd Harris 3-6 6-1 6-2 6-2 on Centre Court, while Querrey shocked French Open runner-up Thiem.

Bernard Tomic denied 'tanking' after he was dispatched 6-2 6-1 6-4 by Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in only 58 minutes - the shortest men's singles match at the All England Club since 2004.

 

 

KYRGIOS READY TO 'HAVE SOME FUN' AGAINST NADAL

Kyrgios was bagelled in the fourth set by Thompson before winning the final set 6-1 in a typically unpredictable performance.

Nadal and Kyrgios have beaten each other three times in their six encounters and the world number 43 is relishing their next battle at SW19, where he came out on top in their first meeting five years ago.

"I have to come with the right attitude, I have to be willing to fight. If not, it's going to be butter for him. He's one of the best tennis players," said Kyrgios.

"I'm not going to think about it. I need to rest, recover, I have a day out, then I want to go out there and have some fun."

 

MY LEGS WEREN'T MOVING - NO EXPRESS START FROM FED

Second seed Federer was not at his imperious best in his opening match of the tournament, dropping the first set to the 86-ranked South African Harris.

Normal service was resumed as the 20-time grand slam champion got into the groove, hitting 42 winners and breaking six times to book a meeting with British outsider Jay Clarke.

"I didn't feel necessarily nervous at all during the day before. I think once I got going, just legs weren't moving and things were not happening," Federer said.

 

THIEM RUES LACK OF TIME

In consecutive seasons, Thiem has reached the French Open final and then lost his first match at Wimbledon, this time to Querrey 6-7 (4-7) 7-6 (7-1) 6-3 6-0.

And the world number four acknowledged he suffered from a lack of time on grass.

"There's still things which are not easy," the Austrian said. "Last year and this year together, I played four grass-court matches, which is not a lot at all. And the clay-court season takes a lot out of me.

"I gave everything I had physically and also mentally in the six weeks up to the end of the French Open. Then I had to take the decision to come here without any preparation."

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