Rafael Nadal dismissed the antics of Nick Kyrgios after the Australian served up an imitation of the Spaniard at the Australian Open.

After being called out for a time violation when serving in his second-round match against Frenchman Gilles Simon, Kyrgios began acting up as he mimicked some of the between-point twitches Nadal is known to express.

His unspoken point appeared to be that world number one Nadal gets an easy ride from umpires given the time he can take to settle before serving.

Chuntering and flicking at his hair, grabbing at his shorts, Kyrgios' obvious impersonation of Nadal even amused the chair umpire who had issued the time violation.

That was towards the end of the second set, and Simon tried a similar routine in the third when he too was picked up on his time between points, with Kyrgios creasing up in amusement.

Nadal may privately take a dim view, and it might strengthen his resolve to knock Kyrgios out of the tournament should they meet in the fourth round.

They are each a win away from making that head-to-head a reality, and when asked about Kyrgios' conduct, Nadal said: "I really don't care. I am here to play tennis. Honestly, I don't care at all. If [it] was funny, good. That's it."

Kyrgios was asked whether he thought he made his point well to the umpire.

"I know what you're getting at," the Australian said in his post-match news conference.

"That’s part of my motion. So I started my service motion. There wasn't any extracurricular activities I was doing before my serve to waste time. I mean, it happened. That's the ref's discretion whether I went over the clock or not."

Kyrgios then made a revelation after he was asked whether his or Simon's take on Nadal was the better.

"I don't know. I don't wear underwear, so... probably Gilles'," Kyrgios said.

Such behaviour may charge up Nadal for their possible showdown, but it was little more than an amusing aside in a four-set win for Kyrgios.

The 23rd seed knows he must keep his cool in Melbourne, given he received a suspended 16-week ban last September for a series of incidents where his conduct overstepped the line, but he insists that prospect is not on his mind.

"There were a couple times when I went overboard, I think, last year which caused the probation. It's not like I'm doing it every match," Kyrgios said. "No, I'm not thinking about it at all."

Kyrgios was unhappy with himself, however, for aiming a brutal verbal volley towards his team in the players' box after dropping the third set, when he slated their words of support.

According to reports, Kyrgios condemned his team for telling him to "stay tough", twice hurling an expletive their way and sarcastically saying their suggestion was "so creative".

"My behaviour towards my box tonight was not acceptable. In my next match, I don't want to do that," Kyrgios said.

"I was being a bit of a d***head to them. I apologised as soon as I went back into the locker room. They don't deserve that. They do a lot of things for me on and off the court."

Alex de Minaur and Nick Kyrgios sealed Australia's place in the ATP Cup semi-finals with an epic doubles win over Great Britain while Russia also marched into the last four on Thursday.

De Minaur and Kyrgios saved four match points before beating Jamie Murray and Joe Salisbury 3-6 6-3 18-16 in Sydney to seal a 2-1 victory for the hosts.

That decisive win came after Dan Evans kept Great Britain alive with a 7-6 (7-4) 4-6 7-6 (7-2) defeat of De Minaur at Ken Rosewall Arena.

Kyrgios, who beat Cameron Norrie to put Australia in front, lifted his team-mate on his shoulders and paraded around the court after they set up a showdown with Spain or Belgium on Saturday.

"t was unreal. The adrenaline has kind of worn off and I'm exhausted after that match. It was awesome," Kyrgios said.

"Today was probably one of the best moments in my career, definitely. Just making it through to the semi-final, the first-ever ATP Cup in that type of fashion, was pretty special.

"We genuinely care for each other, and [our team-mates] were genuinely just so ecstatic to get through."

Russia remain unbeaten after Daniil Medvedev and Karen Khachanov secured a 2-0 triumph over Argentina.

Khachanov put Russia ahead with a 6-2 7-6 (7-4) win over Guido Pella and Medvedev delivered the victory by seeing off Diego Schwartzman 6-4 4-6 6-3.

Medvedev was given a point penalty for clattering the chair umpire's chair with his racket but regained his composure following a chat with captain Marat Safin.

Serbia or Canada stand in the way of Russia and a place in the final.

Alexander Zverev and Stefanos Tsitsipas suffered frustration on day five of the ATP Cup, as Russia and Great Britain joined Australia and Serbia in the quarter-finals.

Germany were eliminated after a 2-1 defeat to Canada where a troubled Zverev lost his third consecutive match of the tournament.

He went down 6-2 6-2 to Denis Shapovalov in 70 minutes after also suffering defeats to Alex de Minaur and Tsitsipas in his country's first two ties.

Jan-Lennard Struff had beaten Felix Auger-Aliassime, but the Canadian later teamed up with fellow youngster Shapovalov to win the decisive doubles against Kevin Krawietz and Andreas Mies in straight sets.

Australia had already won Group F, so Canada will wait for the results on day six to see if they will progress as one of the two best runners-up.

"I'm really happy to get the win and hopefully we can go through," said Shapovalov.

"I feel like we're definitely one of the top teams and I feel like we definitely deserve to go to Sydney. Hopefully, if we do get that chance, we can do some really big damage."

Zverev's serving woes continued as he won only 29 per cent of points on his second serve and had seven double faults, taking his weekly total to 31 in three matches.

The world number seven said: "There's a lot of things that I still need to improve, but it's the start of the season."

Hosts Australia kept up the momentum by winning their third straight tie against Greece, as Tsitsipas fell to defeat.

With De Minaur rested, Nick Kyrgios took over number one duties and won a tense encounter 7-6 (9-7) 6-7 (3-7) 7-6 (7-5).

Tsitsipas inadvertently injured his father Apostolos when smashing his racket in the team zone after losing the opening set tie-break and Greece ended the week without winning a tie.

But the ATP Finals champion was in a reflective mood afterwards, saying: "We had a difficult draw here in Brisbane.

"Canada, Australia … Germany, one of the strongest nations in the game, playing against a small, tiny little nation like Greece, which has no history in tennis at all? 

"You've got to feel proud. We fought very hard and we wanted to prove to the rest of the world that we can play tennis anywhere."

Russia booked their place in the quarter-finals with a 3-0 win over Norway, Daniil Medvedev handing Casper Ruud his first singles defeat of the week.

Italy were victorious against the United States but cannot reach the next stage despite winning two of their three Group D ties.

Great Britain won 3-0 against Moldova and Belgium's 2-1 win over Bulgaria meant Tim Henman's team progressed as Group C winners and will face Australia in Sydney on Thursday.

Belgium, like Canada, face a nervous wait for Wednesday's results with Spain, Croatia, Japan, Austria, South Africa, France and Argentina the other countries vying to fill the four remaining spots.

An emotional Nick Kyrgios explained his motivations for donating to the effort fighting Australia's bushfires after helping his nation to victory over Germany at the ATP Cup.

Kyrgios beat Jan-Lennard Struff 6-4 7-6 (7-4) in Brisbane, sending down 20 aces after his pledge to give 200 Australian dollars to the bushfires effort for each service winner he hits in January.

Alex de Minaur – Kyrgios' team-mate at the event, who impressively came from a set down to defeat an ill-tempered Alex Zverev 4-6 7-6 (7-3) 6-2 – followed suit after Kyrgios tweeted his intention to help, while stars from other sports have also joined in.

Brisbane Heat captain Chris Lynn struck three sixes as he top-scored in his team's win over Hobart Hurricanes in the Big Bash League on Friday, with each maximum worth $250 to the recovery effort.

"I don't really care about the praise too much. I just think we've got the ability and platform to do something like that," Kyrgios told Amazon Prime when asked about the movement he inadvertently started.

"My home town is Canberra and we've got the most toxic air in the world at the moment, so it is pretty sad. It's tough."

Having appeared choked up at that point, Kyrgios added: "I just chucked up a tweet and everyone got behind it. It is bigger than tennis.

"It's going to all the families, firefighters, animals, everyone who is losing homes, losing families. It's a real thing.

Australia completed a 3-0 Group F win after Chris Guccione and John Peers beat German doubles pair Kevin Krawietz and Andreas Mies 6-3 6-4.

In the section's other match, Canada were similarly emphatic against Greece, with Denis Shapovalov winning a pair of tie-breaks to best Stefanos Tsitsipas after Felix Auger-Aliassime demolished Michail Pervolarakis 6-1 6-3.

Auger-Aliassime and Shapovalov then combined to win the doubles rubber against the same opponents, prevailing 6-2 6-3.

Great Britain and the United States both allowed leads to slip against Bulgaria and Norway respectively.

In Group C, Cameron Norrie beat world number 423 Dimitar Kuzmanov in three sets and Dan Evans made a fast start against Grigor Dimitrov to go a set up.

But Dimitrov prevailed 2-6 6-4 6-1 and he and Alexandar Lazarov triumphed after three tie-breaks against Jamie Murray and Joe Salisbury in the small hours of the Sydney morning.

Taylor Fritz beat Viktor Durasovic 6-2 6-2 and John Isner had the USA in charge of the second singles rubber when he took the opening tie break versus Casper Ruud, only for two match points and a second breaker to go against him. He eventually lost, going down 7-5 in the deciding set.

Ruud and Durasovic then recovered from dropping the first set to beat Austin Krajicek and Rajeev Ram 10-5 in a match tie-break in Perth.

Steve Darcis and David Goffin inspired Belgium to a 3-0 Group C win over Moldova, while Daniil Medvedev's 1-6 6-1-6-3 victory against Fabio Fognini helped clinch a 3-0 victory for Russia against Italy in Group D.

A tennis exhibition event will be held in Melbourne on January 15 in a bid to raise funds for bushfire relief efforts.

Bushfires are raging across Australia, with New South Wales and Victoria among the states affected.

Nick Kyrgios, who has already said he will donate 200 Australian dollars for every ace he hits during the summer, has vowed to take part.

Tennis Australia (TA) said participating players for the AO Rally for Relief, to be played at Rod Laver Arena in the lead up to the Australian Open, would be revealed in the coming days.

"It is heartbreaking to see the devastation the bushfires are wreaking across the country and to see so many people and communities suffering," TA chief executive and Australian Open tournament director Craig Tiley said.

"The Aces for Bushfire Relief initiative gives the tennis community the opportunity to galvanise our sport to support and raise much-needed funds to help those who are most in need.

"We are working closely with the top players and have already had a great response, with many of them keen to help this incredibly important cause.

"We look forward to providing an evening of great tennis and entertainment to raise as much money as we can for bushfire relief."

Kyrgios wrote on Twitter: "Proud of @TennisAustralia @AustralianOpen commitment to helping those affected by the fires. I will be there Wednesday no question.

"Come out, show some support anyway you can, please."

TA has already committed a donation of 100 Australian dollars for every ace served at the ATP Cup and will grant one million Australian dollars to assist communities in repairing and rebuilding tennis facilities damaged in the bushfires.

Nick Kyrgios has pledged to donate $200 for every ace he serves during the Australian summer for those affected by devastating bushfires in his homeland. 

At least 18 people have been killed as blazes ravage areas of New South Wales and Victoria.

A week-long state of emergency has been declared in New South Wales from Friday, with thousands of people told to evacuate the area between Batemans Bay and the border with the state of Victoria following the forecast of searing temperatures on Saturday.

Kyrgios proposed an exhibition match before the Australian Open and will use his powerful serve to help victims of the fires.

The world number 30 tweeted on Thursday: "I'm kicking off the support for those affected by the fires. I'll be donating $200 per ace that I hit across all the events I play this summer."

Kyrgios' compatriots Alex de Minaur and John Millman responded by vowing to donate $250 and $100 per ace respectively.

Tennis Australia chief executive Craig Tiley earlier posted on social media: "For weeks we've been watching the devastation caused by bushfires across Australia and the people affected are constantly in our thoughts.

"We want to help these communities in a meaningful way and will announce a number of fundraising initiatives that will be rolled out across the ATP Cup, Australian Open and our other events over the coming weeks."

Denis Shapovalov and Vasek Pospisil sent Australia packing as Alex de Minaur's singles victory proved fruitless in the first Davis Cup quarter-final.

With Pospisil defeating John Millman 7-6 (9-7) 6-4 in the opening match, Australia relied on a comeback from De Minaur to haul themselves level.

Next Gen ATP Finals runner up De Minaur – Australia's star player in Thursday's tie with Nick Kyrgios sitting out – did it the hard way, coming from a set down to beat Shapovalov 3-6 6-3 7-5 and tee up a deciding doubles encounter.

But Canada were too good in the doubles – Pospisil picking up where he left off while Shapovalov bounced back from his loss in style via a 6-4 6-4 win.

A break of serve in the opening game against Australian counterparts Jordan Thompson and John Peers paved the way for the pair to claim the first set with ease.

Thompson and Peers looked set to take the match all the way when they earned a 3-0 lead in set two, only for Shapovalov and Pospisil to restore parity before pushing on to seal progression with their first match point.

Serbia play Russia, Argentina face Spain and Great Britain go up against Germany in the other quarter-final ties, which will be played on Friday.

Lleyton Hewitt welcomed the return of "different character" Nick Kyrgios to Australia's Davis Cup team.

The controversial Kyrgios has not represented his country since February 2018 but is back for the Davis Cup Finals, beginning in Madrid on November 18.

Rumours of a rift between Kyrgios and Hewitt surfaced at the beginning of this year following the latter's well-publicised fall-out with Bernard Tomic.

Kyrgios claimed at a news conference at the Australian Open there was "not really" a problem between the two when addressing the situation, but later in the tournament appeared to aim a dig at Hewitt with a deleted Instagram poll.

The 24-year-old has also endured another controversy-filled season on the ATP Tour and was hit with a fine and suspended ban for hurling abuse at umpire Fergus Murphy in a defeat to Karen Khachanov at the Western and Southern Open in August.

However, Australia captain Hewitt said the two have met to clear the air and praised Kyrgios' attitude towards the Davis Cup.

"For Nick and I this has been something that he flagged with me around March," Hewitt said when speaking to reporters.

"We sat down at Indian Wells and went through things and he has been so willing to do whatever it takes to get back into the Davis Cup team and play for Australia.

"Nick's a different character and I understand that and we're not always going to put everybody in the same box.

"You've got to deal with different personalities in all kind of sports, and I feel like I know Nick as well as anyone.

"I feel like on the Davis Cup court he's done everything I've needed in the past whenever he's been a part of the team. He hasn't put a foot wrong, he's out there picking up balls, half coaching and encouraging other players.

"There's a lot of things he does in a team environment that I actually think we'll see the best of him."

Hewitt has been impressed with Kyrgios' willingness to get back involved with the team.

"He didn't play in Austria last year purely more because of his body, and then he obviously had issues at the start of this year," he added.

"For him it was straight away I got a message saying, 'Mate, I want to get back in the team.' The great thing is he has a great relationship with all the players as well. 

"He trains with them every day of every tournament, he hangs out with our coaching staff, physios and everyone else.

"In terms of that it's never really been an issue, it's kind of about him wanting to be a part of the team and do the right things day in day out.

"For me I'd much rather have him on my team."

Nick Kyrgios has pledged to keep his emotions under wraps after he received a suspended fine and ban from the ATP Tour.

The 24-year-old caused controversy at the Western & Southern Open in August when he hurled abuse at umpire Fergus Murphy in a defeat to Karen Khachanov, while he also smashed two rackets during an unpermitted bathroom break.

Kyrgios was initially fined $113,000, but an investigation from the ATP deemed the Australian had "committed aggravated behaviour" and was also guilty of a "pattern of behaviour" when it came to verbally abusing officials or spectators.

A $25,000 fine and 16-week ban from the Tour were handed to Kyrgios on Thursday, though both are deferred for six months, with the world number 27 placed on probation and under orders to avoid any code violations that result in a fine for verbal or physical abuse, unsportsmanlike conduct or visible obscenities.

Taking to his official Instagram account, Kyrgios told his fans to stay relaxed, while promising to be "on my best behaviour" to avoid triggering the sanctions, though insisting he will not take any of the fun out of his playing style.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Guess I’m on my best behaviour for 6 months #detention

A post shared by NK (@k1ngkyrg1os) on 

"Everyone, I can still play, I'm just on probation, relax," Kyrgios wrote in a post shared on his Instagram story.

"I'll be playing and tennis will still be fun, it's ok, I just have to keep a lid on my behaviour, that's all."

Kyrgios then followed up his first post with a picture of him in action, captioned "good boy vibes", as he took the punishment in his stride.

Earlier on Thursday, Kyrgios confirmed he was pulling out of the Asian swing with a collarbone injury, though he could return in November for the Davis Cup finals.

Nick Kyrgios has been hit with a $25,000 fine and 16-week ban from the ATP Tour - both of which are suspended - following his antics at the Western & Southern in August.

The Australian was initially fined $113,000 having hurled abuse at umpire Fergus Murphy in his loss to Karen Khachanov in Cincinnati, while he also smashed two rackets during a bathroom break he had not been given permission to take.

That triggered an investigation from the ATP and the governing body found Kyrgios "committed aggravated behaviour" and was guilty of a "pattern of behaviour" when it came to verbally abusing officials or spectators.

Kyrgios' latest fine and suspension have both been deferred for a period of six months, provided there are no further code violations that result in a fine for verbal or physical abuse, unsportsmanlike conduct or visible obscenities.

He has the right to lodge an appeal against the decision within the next five working days.

The controversial world number 27 was previously handed bans and fines in 2015 and 2016, and the ATP has ordered he must receive support from a mental coach at Tour events as well as "a professional specialising in behavioural management" after the season ends.

In a separate investigation, Kyrgios received no additional penalties for comments at the US Open – when he called the ATP "corrupt" – having backtracked on those views in a social media post the following day.

Earlier in the day, Kyrgios confirmed he was pulling out of the Asian swing with a collarbone injury, though he could return in November for the Davis Cup finals.

Nick Kyrgios has pulled out of the Asian swing of the ATP Tour with a collarbone injury as he looks to recover in time for the Davis Cup finals in November.

The 24-year-old explained a problem he suffered at the Laver Cup had worsened to the point where he was returning home to Australia.

Kyrgios, ranked 23rd in the Race to London standings, is unlikely to qualify for the season-ending ATP Finals so may have played his final singles tournament in a year where he has won titles in Acapulco and Washington.

However, he said this week he hopes to recover in time to represent Australia at the Davis Cup finals in November, when Australia face Belgium and Colombia.

"Unfortunately a collarbone injury I sustained during [the] Laver Cup has escalated and has forced me to pull out of the Asian swing, I'll be heading back to Australia to rest, see you all soon," Kyrgios wrote on Instagram.

Kyrgios suffered a first-round exit against Andreas Seppi at the Zhuhai Open on Wednesday, delivering an underarm serve at one point - a successful tactic he has used in the past - due to the discomfort in his shoulder.

Nick Kyrgios suggested his season might be over after a first-round exit at the Zhuhai Open.

Italian Andreas Seppi came from 4-1 down in the first set against Kyrgios, who failed to convert three set points at 5-3, before closing out a 7-6 (7-5) 6-1 triumph.

The Australian threw in an underarm serve during the first set and cited shoulder discomfort as a factor in his collapse.

"I was battling with a bit of a shoulder/collar bone injury," he said, as quoted by the Herald Sun. "At this rate, I'm not thinking about playing until the front of my shoulder feels better."

Kyrgios reported the joint had been "clicking" during the Seppi match and, when asked whether he might sit out the rest of the season, he replied: "For sure, I mean at this rate I wouldn't be surprised.

"I wasn't able to even serve at a reasonable pace. I'm probably not going to bother playing until I can get it right again."

France's Lucas Pouille was another seed to depart as he had no answer to a supreme serving display from Soonwoo Kwon.

Kwon only lost six of 41 points on his first serve and won 7-6 (7-4) 6-2 to set up a meeting against fellow qualifier Damir Dzumhur.

Eighth seed Albert Ramos-Vinolas came through a sound examination against Miomir Kecmanovic, saving four set points in the opener before prevailing 7-6 (7-2) 6-3

Serbian Kecmanovic served at 40-0 with the first set 5-4 in his favour but could not shake off his Spanish opponent, who next meets Gail Monfils - a 5-7 6-3 6-4 winner in an entertaining encounter with Britain's Cameron Norrie.

At the Chengdu Open, Denis Shapovalov served 16 aces and saved all nine break points he afforded Ricardas Berankis in a 6-4 6-3 victory.

Canadian Shapovalov's prowess on serve was rivalled by Alexander Bublik's 25 aces in a 4-6 7-5 7-5 win against the sixth seed Taylor Fritz, where he won 83 per cent of his first-serve points.

Jordan Thompson is up next for Bublik after outlasting Vasek Pospisil 6-3 3-6 7-5 in a match clocking in at two hours and 29 minutes, while Portugal's Joao Sousa set up a meeting with second seed Felix Auger-Aliassime despite a rocky start versus wildcard Hyeon Chung.

Chung stormed to the first set in only his second tour match since a back injury in February but subsided 1-6 6-3 6-4.

Rafael Nadal was forced to pull out of his singles and doubles matches on day three of the Laver Cup with an "inflamed hand".

The French Open and US Open champion had been set to feature in a high-profile doubles pairing with Roger Federer against John Isner and Jack Sock in the opening match of Sunday's play.

Nadal was also set to take on Nick Kyrgios in singles later in the day, having been beaten by the Australian in a doubles contest late on Saturday.

But that match the previous day, in which Nadal and Stefanos Tsitsipas lost to Kyrgios and Sock, meant the Spaniard was not able to recover in time.

He complained of inflammation to his left hand on Sunday morning - an issue he says he has dealt with for "a couple of years" - and Tsitsipas was called in to take his place alongside Federer.

Thiem will play Kyrgios, meanwhile, with Team Europe aiming to wrap up a third straight title, carrying a narrow 7-5 lead into the final day.

Nadal said: "I am sad, of course. I was excited to play the doubles with Roger obviously - that's the thing that makes me more sad because, in singles, I know Dominic is going to be there and he's going to do unbelievably.

"Since a couple of years ago, I've had this bad feeling on the hand. It's an inflamation of the hand - not the wrist.

"Yesterday, I played and sometimes the next day you are a little bit better, sometimes you are a little bit worse. Today, I think it's a little bit more inflamed.

"This morning, I woke up with that feeling that something is inflamed on the hand and I texted Roger and Thomas [Enqvist, vice-captain] and Bjorn [Borg, captain].

"We needed to find a solution because I don't think I'm the right one to play today and we have a great team without me being 100 per cent. All the guys are unbelievable."

He added: "Now, let's support and hopefully we can achieve this."

Nick Kyrgios bounced back from a tough defeat to Roger Federer to keep Team World in the mix for a breakthrough Laver Cup victory in a doubles success alongside Jack Sock.

Europe, who have won the prior two editions of the competition, lead 7-5 heading into the final day, but they might have had one hand on the trophy already if not for Kyrgios.

A home side able to name a line-up where each of their six players are ranked higher than John Isner, their opponents' top star, celebrated singles triumphs for Federer and Rafael Nadal but found Kyrgios in determined mood late on Saturday evening.

Team World had struck first to level the contest at 3-3, with wins on the second day worth two points - double their first-day value, while third-day victories earn three.

Isner saw opponent Alexander Zverev fall apart and clinched a 6-7 (2-7) 6-4 10-1 success.

Pegged back, matters looked to be going from bad to worse for Europe when the dangerous Kyrgios took the first set against Federer.

But the Swiss veteran recovered to triumph 6-7 (5-7) 7-5 10-7 and it appeared to be plain sailing from there, with Nadal winning the final singles contest of the day, easing past Milos Raonic 6-3 7-6 (7-1) to regain complete control of the competition.

"Being here for me is a very positive energy," Nadal said. "I like being around such a great team and the crowd is amazing.

"I feel very lucky [to win] the first set. I started to play better later in the match and I think I played a very good tie-break in the end."

The Spaniard was back on court to close out Saturday's play, teaming up with Stefanos Tsitsipas, to take on Kyrgios and Sock.

However, Kyrgios gave an early indication of what was to come as he started in impressive fashion again with some blistering winners in an opener Team World dominated, breaking swiftly and protecting the serve with ease.

The Australian was guilty of gifting away the decisive first break in the second set, making a mess of a seemingly straightforward volley, before coming into his own again with the match level.

Nadal was too often left to plough a lone furrow by Tsitsipas and Kyrgios excelled at the net, greeting each European error in typically extravagant fashion.

Fittingly, after a one-sided tie-break, the match was clinched on Kyrgios' serve 6-4 3-6 10-6 to set up an intriguing final day.

Rafael Nadal should head into the second week of the US Open with a spring in his step after another routine win at Flushing Meadows.

Nadal was the beneficiary of a walkover in his second-round match after Thanasi Kokkinakis' withdrawal and needed just under two hours to beat Hyeon Chung in the third round in New York on Saturday.

Spanish second seed Nadal – looking to reclaim the title he won in 2017 – will next face 2014 champion Marin Cilic, who won the battle of the big servers with John Isner.

While Nadal has enjoyed a routine first week, Alexander Zverev continued to showcase a flair for the dramatic, needing four sets to beat Aljaz Bedene and reach the last 16.

 

ZVEREV: EVERYTHING CAN BE BETTER

Sixth seed Zverev played three tie-break sets in overcoming Bedene 6-7 (4-7) 7-6 (7-4) 6-3 7-6 (7-3), requiring three hours, 36 minutes to get through to round four.

It was another marathon effort from the German, which came on the back of a pair of five-setters with Radu Albot and Frances Tiafoe.

Diego Schwartzman – a winner against Tennys Sandgren – is next for Zverev, who knows the difficulty of his match is only going to increase.

"It doesn't get easier, the opponents don't get easier, the matches don't get easier," he said.

"There's still a lot of things to improve. Obviously, I mean, if you go into details, we'll be here for a very long time. In general, the serving, the returning. Everything can still be better."


MONFILS PRODUCES MAGIC AT SECOND HOME

Gael Monfils went the distance against Denis Shapovalov, the 13th seed eventually prevailing 6-7 (5-7) 7-6 (7-4) 6-4 6-7 (6-8) 6-3.

Monfils' best grand slam results came at the 2008 French Open and in 2016 at Flushing Meadows, reaching the semi-finals on each occasion.

Asked if he feels if the US Open is his second home, Monfils replied: "Here is definitely the second for me, the second slam in my heart, the second biggest tournament in my heart for many reasons.

"Also New York, my idol is Arthur Ashe. Always something magic happen. I feel very good here."

Pablo Andujar is Monfils' next opponent. The 33-year-old progressed to the second week of a slam for the first time in his career with a 6-4 6-3 6-2 defeat of Alexander Bublik.


GAMER KYRGIOS STRUGGLES UNDER LIGHTS

Nick Kyrgios had a tough act to follow as he faced Andrey Rublev last on Arthur Ashe following the blockbuster clash between Naomi Osaka and Coco Gauff.

The enigmatic Australian could not live up to the occasion, losing 7-6 (7-5) 7-6 (7-5) 6-3, having conceded to finding it difficult to see during the match.

He was heard saying "Call of Duty will ruin my life" at one point. Asked about those remarks, the 28th seed replied: "I was just taking a shot because I game a lot.

"My eyes might have taken a while to adjust to the lights, yeah. Bit of a gamer."

His fellow Aussie Alexei Popyrin was beaten by Matteo Berrettini 6-4 6-4 6-7 (3-7) 7-6 (7-2).

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