Stefanos Tsitsipas believes he is "really close" to winning a grand slam after his ATP Finals success on Sunday.

The Greek, 21, became the youngest player to win the ATP Finals since 2001 after a thrilling 6-7 (6-8) 6-2 7-6 (7-4) victory over Dominic Thiem in London.

Tsitsipas, a semi-finalist at the Australian Open this year, feels a major success is not far away, with Wimbledon a goal.

"For sure Wimbledon is the tournament that has a lot of tradition. I think most of the players if you ask would want to win Wimbledon, but for me any grand slam would be great," he told a news conference.

"I feel like my game is getting better over time. I believe I'm really close on being crowned a grand slam champion. I know these are strong words that I say but I do feel like I belong to be there.

"I'm competing against some of the best players in the world and the amount of effort and the amount of work I put [in] every day deserves to have an outcome like this."

While Tsitsipas and Thiem reached the final in London, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic won two grand slams each in 2019.

The 'Big Three' of Nadal, Djokovic and Roger Federer have won 55 grand slams since 2003, including the past 12, and Tsitsipas is aware of the huge challenge awaiting the next generation.

"The thing that we have, the 'Big Three' dominating in the grand slams the last couple of years makes it really difficult for us because someone needs to get the job done to defeat them [in the] early rounds because once they get deep into a tournament they tend, as we saw, over the years to get better and play better, feel better," he said.

"For me, that's a really difficult task to do, for players to be able to beat them in these grand slams because it's a best-of-five format and this gives them more chances to stay in the match.

"It's not a best of three. If things were best of three it could have been much more different when it comes to grand slam champions over the years.

"So, that's an issue because they have been sharing how many grand slams? I don't know, 60 something?

"And for the young guys, it's all about time. I don't know. We'll either have to beat them or wait for them."

Stefanos Tsitsipas had "no idea" how he moved to another level in the second set of a "rollercoaster" clash with Dominic Thiem before going on to win the ATP Finals.

The 21-year-old became the first Greek champion at the season-ending tournament, beating Thiem 6-7 (6-8) 6-2 7-6 (7-4) in a classic showdown at the O2 Arena on Sunday.

Tsitsipas and Thiem put on a thrilling show in London, the aggressive sixth seed putting the disappointment of losing a first-set tie-break behind him by bossing the second set.

Two-time French Open runner-up Thiem came 3-1 down to force another breaker, which Tsitsipas led 4-1 before the fifth seed stormed back again by winning the next three points.

Tsitsipas was not to be denied the biggest title of his fledgling career on his debut at the event, a year after he was crowned Next Gen champion, and he was at a loss to explain how he was able to level the match in such assertive fashion.

"I have no clue how I played so well in the second set," said Tsitsipas, the youngest winner of the tournament since Lleyton Hewitt in 2001.

"I have no idea. I think my mind was at ease and I wasn't really thinking of much, which led to such a great performance in the second set, breaking him twice. It was pretty much an excellent set for me.

"It was pretty frustrating for me to be playing with such nerves [during the final set]] for the first time in such a big event. I was a break up, I couldn't manage to hold it.

"Things were decided in the tie-break and I am so relieved by this outstanding performance and fight that I gave out on the court."

He added: "It's been a rollercoaster. Holding this trophy right now feels amazing."

Stefanos Tsitsipas edged a final-set tie-break in a classic battle with Dominic Thiem to claim the biggest title of his career and become the first Greek ATP Finals champion.

Tsitsipas and Thiem served up a thriller at the O2 Arena on Sunday and it was the 21-year-old tournament debutant who came out on top, prevailing 6-7 (6-8) 6-2 7-6 (7-4).

It took two hours and 35 minutes to settle an epic match that swung one way and the other, Thiem coming from 4-1 down in the decisive tie-break to get back on serve before Tsitsipas became the youngest winner of the competition since Lleyton Hewitt in 2001.

Tsitsipas struck 34 winners to two-time French Open runner-up Thiem's 36 in a pulsating, high-quality final, ending the season on a high note in London.

There was evidence of nerves as both players held to love in their first service games and Thiem thwarted the sixth seed when he faced the first break point in the fourth game.

The two warriors were aggressive from the start, unleashing winner after winner off both wings and charging to the net with authority.

Tsitsipas and Thiem saved two break points apiece before the Austrian came out on top in a tie-break, an errant backhand costing the Athens native.

A sprightly Tsitsipas put that behind him by taking a firm grip of the second set, putting away a brilliant forehand winner after toying with Thiem to go a double break up at 3-0.

Tsitsipas was relentless, serving it out after making only one unforced error in a one-sided second set and Thiem disappeared off court to gather himself for the decider.

The momentum was with Tsitsipas, who showed no let-up as he piled huge pressure on Thiem, who saved two break points in the first game of the final set but was up against it at 2-1 down after drilling a backhand into the net.

Thiem was not done yet, drawing on his fighting spirit and class to get back on serve at 3-3 and it seemed almost inevitable another breaker would be required to split the two.

Tsitsipas stormed into a 4-1 advantage and although Thiem refused to accept defeat as he stormed back to level at 4-4, a couple of stray groundstrokes cost him as he was denied in a titanic tussle between the first-time finalists.

Stefanos Tsitsipas described himself as "living the dream" after knocking out Roger Federer to book an ATP Finals showpiece against Dominic Thiem.

Greek star Tsitsipas ousted Federer 6-3 6-4 in the semi-final of the season-ending event to reach the biggest final of his career.

Tsitsipas has had an up-and-down year which started with a run to the last four of the Australian Open and was followed by a mid-season slump, but he appears to be keeping his best until last.

The 21-year-old saved 11 of Federer's 12 break points on Saturday and explained beating the 20-time grand slam champion, who he watched winning major tournaments growing up, was difficult to comprehend.

"I grew up watching Roger here at the ATP Finals and Wimbledon and other finals," said Tsitsipas, who also beat Federer in the last 16 of the Australian Open.

"I wished one day I could face him and now I'm here living the dream.

"I remember myself being one of the kids here watching the event and I could never picture myself here. But it can happen.

"This victory is probably one of my best moments of the season. These are the moments I live for.

"This does feel, in a way, like a grand slam, because all eyes are here. Everyone knows this event. Everyone who watches tennis knows what the ATP Finals are.

"For me, it's a great new start, great new beginning to be here, playing in the Finals. It's really very difficult to be in that position I am in right now and it counts a lot."

Kyriakos Mitsotakis, the prime minister of Greece, was in attendance for the match and greeted Tsitsipas afterwards, highlighting the magnitude of his triumph.

"I'm really glad I played well, stayed calm," Tsitsipas said.

"It's a great moment not just for me, for everyone else, my country, my team. I'm proud of myself, how hard I fought, how concentrated I stayed in the break points. 

"I didn't crack under pressure. I was very composed and very mature in my decisions."

Tsitsipas and Thiem have met on six occasions over the last two years.

Thiem won four of those, including the most recent clash last month, which was a three-set battle in the China Open final.

Dominic Thiem will face Stefanos Tsitsipas for the ATP Finals title after dethroning Alexander Zverev in straight sets.

Thiem beat Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic to reach the last four of the season-ending tournament for the first time and dispatched Zverev 7-5 6-3 at the O2 Arena in London on Saturday.

Zverev was unable to break the fifth seed, who was more composed than the defending champion and broke once in each set to set up a showdown with Tsitsipas - conqueror of Federer earlier in the day.

Thiem has won five titles in a stellar season and the two-time French Open runner-up will claim the biggest of his career if he gets the better of Tsitsipas on Sunday, having struck 21 winners in his sixth victory in eight meetings with Zverev.

The first break point came for Zverev, but Thiem denied his close friend to level at 2-2 after unleashing one of a number of blistering backhands.

Zverev saw another break point pass him by and it was his opponent - wearing exactly the same attire - who got the decisive break of a tight opening set. 

A couple of sloppy errors from Zverev gave Thiem two set points and the German thrashed his racket into the ground after returning to his chair following a costly double fault.

Zverev headed off court after watching his racket fly up in the air when he drilled it against the hard court in fury and the seventh seed was a break down at 4-2 in the second following a string of unforced errors.

Thiem got himself out of trouble when Zverev forced two break points in the next game and sealed victory with a forehand winner.

Matteo Berrettini bowed out of the ATP Finals on a high note by claiming his first victory of the tournament, ending Dominic Thiem's 100 per cent record in the process.

Thiem, who had already qualified for the semi-finals for the first time at the O2 Arena with magnificent victories over Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic, was beaten 7-6 (7-3) 6-3 by an inspired Berrettini on Thursday.

The exertions put into defeating two of the all-time greats appeared to have taken a toll on the fifth seed, Berrettini capitalising to become the first Italian to win a match at the season-ending event.

Tournament debutant Berrettini struck 30 winners - 17 off his powerful forehand - and was broken only once, ending a successful season by levelling their head-to-head record at 2-2.

Federer and Djokovic will battle it out in the second session for the right to join Thiem in advancing from Group Bjorn Borg in London.

Berrettini seized control in the opening set by breaking to love for a 5-4 lead, a cross-court winner, following up one on his backhand side, drawing applause from his opponent.

The eighth seed failed to consolidate, netting a forehand volley after an excellent return from Thiem, but Berrettini put that behind him by bossing the tie-break, wrapping it up with an ace.

Berrettini's blistering forehand continued to fire in the second set and he broke to lead 4-2 following rasping winners off both wings, then ended his fruitful campaign with a drop shot that Thiem was unable to chase down.

Novak Djokovic praised Dominic Thiem's "unbelievable" performance after suffering a thrilling loss to the Austrian at the ATP Finals on Tuesday.

Djokovic went down to Thiem 6-7 (5-7) 6-3 7-6 (7-5) after an enthralling contest at the O2 Arena in London.

Thiem hit 51 winners and just as many unforced errors during an aggressive display that eventually paid off with victory in two hours, 47 minutes.

Djokovic, who will face Roger Federer in Group Bjorn Borg for a place in the semi-finals, praised Thiem's performance.

"I thought he deserved to win. He just played very courageous tennis and just smacking the ball, he went for broke, the entire match he played the same way he played the last point," the Serbian 16-time grand slam champion told a news conference.

"I mean, I have to put my hat down and congratulate him because he just played a great match."

Djokovic added: "I don't think I've experienced too many matches like this where my opponent just goes for every single shot.

"I mean, he was unbelievable, in some stages it was just incredible that he was just literally smacking the ball as hard as he can and it was going in.

"Of course his level is super high, today was unbelievable, but whether he can keep that up every match, if he does, chapeau, there's not much you can say, for sure he's playing great tennis."

Dominic Thiem said he was "in the zone" during his thrilling ATP Finals win over Novak Djokovic on Tuesday.

The Austrian booked his spot in the semi-finals in London by overcoming Djokovic 6-7 (5-7) 6-3 7-6 (7-5) at the O2 Arena.

Thiem, who beat Roger Federer in Group Bjorn Borg on Sunday, said it was an unforgettable performance.

"I was in the zone from the first point on," he said in an on-court interview.

"I served for the match at 6-5 in the third set, but obviously I was playing the best returner in the game so I didn't worry too much, I was focusing on the tie-break and coming back from 4-1, a little bit of luck here and there.

"But, in general, it was just unbelievable and a match that I will probably never forget."

Thiem hit 51 winners during his win, coming from 4-1 down in the third-set tie-break to edge past Djokovic.

The 26-year-old was delighted with his performance and said it was the level required to beat the 16-time grand slam champion.

"This was really one of these very special matches that I practised all my life for, what I practised all my childhood for, a really epic one in front of an amazing atmosphere, beating a real legend of our game," Thiem said.

"I couldn't be happier and also I qualified for the semi-finals which is the best."

He added: "I was playing Novak, who is in great shape, who is probably the best player in the world right now.

"I had to do something special and luckily a lot of these balls and these winners went into the court."

Thiem will face Italian Matteo Berrettini in his final match in the group on Thursday.

Dominic Thiem followed up his win over Roger Federer with a stunning performance in an enthralling 6-7 (5-7) 6-3 7-6 (7-5) victory over Novak Djokovic to secure his progression in the ATP Finals.

The most recent meeting between Djokovic and Thiem went the distance at Roland Garros in May, and it was the latter who triumphed again in a two-hour 50-minute classic.

After losing a 66-minute first set, Thiem rallied to force a decider for the first time in a match at this year's edition of the Finals, while ending Matteo Berrettini's slim qualification hopes in the process.

Despite going a break down, Djokovic - who will now battle it out with Federer for a last-four spot - seemed to have turned the tide in the final set, but Thiem thrived under the pressure, fighting back to clinch a remarkable win on a tie-break.

Djokovic looked set to take control after breaking on Thiem's second service game, yet the Austrian returned the favour to draw level at 3-3.

Thiem denied Djokovic a chance to claim the set in game 10, forcing the world number two onto the backfoot with a venomous serve.

Djokovic was at his best to nose himself ahead in the tiebreak with a stunning cross-court shot, but Thiem found a way back, only for an overhit forehand to hand to give last year's runner up an advantage he did not relinquish.

Two sensational backhands saw Thiem respond with a decisive early break in set two, racing into a lead that proved unassailable.

Thiem raised his arms to the crowd as he restored parity on his serve, though it was Djokovic's turn to fire up the spectators in the opening game of the decider, thumping the air after a wonderful defensive shot won him his first point.

It was to no avail as Thiem claimed another break, but Djokovic - after failing to take advantage of three chances to bounce straight back - did manage to swing momentum in his favour in game six.

However, Thiem refused to go down, holding serve magnificently before breaking for a fourth time, though a loss of focus at the vital moment resulted in another tie-break.

A sloppy start put Thiem on the back foot, but three successive winners paved the way for the world number five to force Djokovic into a weak shot into the net and ensure his place in the semi-finals for the first time.

Roger Federer blamed "first-round hiccups" for the loss to Dominic Thiem that leaves him at risk of an early exit from the ATP Finals.

Austrian Thiem completed a hat-trick of wins over the 20-time grand slam champion in 2019 with a 7-5 7-5 victory on the opening day in London.

Federer now faces a tough task to advance from Group Bjorn Borg, which also contains Novak Djokovic and Matteo Berrettini.

The 38-year-old committed 30 unenforced errors and won 11 of 22 points on his second serve in an uneven showing at the O2 Arena on Sunday.

"I thought he played well. The start definitely didn't help. That put me on the back foot a little bit," Federer said.

"But I recovered well and I thought the match was pretty even for a long period of time. I felt I had my chances. Didn't feel like I was outplayed or anything.

"Just maybe those first-round hiccups a little bit, not hitting your spots on the serve when you need to, getting into trouble early in the service games, which maybe doesn't happen later in the tournament."

Federer won the last of his six ATP Finals titles in 2011 and will have to be at his best to stay in contention for a seventh.

"It's a normal tournament from here on forward. I'm not allowed to lose anymore," the Swiss star said.

"That's how it is every week of the year for the past 20 years, so from that standpoint there is nothing new."

Both players are back in action on Tuesday as Federer faces tournament debutant Berrettini, who was no match for a dominant Djokovic.

The manner of the Serbian's 6-2 6-1 triumph and the tight schedule gives Thiem little time to savour his fifth career win over "probably the best player of all time".

"The system is pretty brutal, I would say, because I had an amazing victory," he said.

"I'm feeling great. I'm feeling now that I have a good chance to reach the semis, but if I lose on Tuesday, for example, everything is completely open again and I [would] have to worry about everything on the next match on Thursday.

"The only thing I can do is rest well [on Monday], practice well, and be fully focused again on Tuesday."

Dominic Thiem continued his dominance of Roger Federer this year with a straight-sets victory on the opening day of the ATP Finals.

Thiem had beaten the 20-time grand slam champion twice this season and completed the hat-trick with a 7-5 7-5 victory at the O2 Arena on Sunday.

The fifth-seeded Thiem has not reached the semi-finals in his three previous appearances in London, but made a confident start after Novak Djokovic beat Matteo Berrettini in the opening Group Bjorn Borg match.

Thiem served and returned superbly, improving his record against Federer to five victories and two defeats as he bids to end a fruitful 2019 by claiming a sixth title of the year.

Federer dominated the robin-round encounter between the two in this tournament last year, but was a break down after firing a forehand into the tramlines in the opening game.

The Austrian was pegged back at 2-2 when Federer forced an error with a ferocious backhand, yet the six-time champion was unable to cut out the errors and trailed 6-5 after Thiem pounced on his second serve.

Thiem served out the set with great composure and both players had a packed crowd purring as they showed their athleticism with classy winners at the net early in the second.

Federer fizzed a majestic backhand winner down the line and saved a break point before levelling at 2-2, while Thiem continued to pepper his veteran opponent with powerful, accurate ground strokes.

Thiem drew gasps with a scorching one-handed backhand winner and broke to love to lead 6-5 when Federer netted after a blistering return was arrowed at his feet.

Federer went down with a fight, but the third seed was beaten when he dumped a backhand into the net after seeing two points to get back on serve come and go.

Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer will meet in the group stage of the ATP Finals after being drawn together on Tuesday.

The pair have won 36 grand slams between them and triumphed at the season-ending tournament a collective 11 times, with Federer leading that head-to-head tally by one.

Joining the Swiss maestro and Djokovic in Bjorn Borg Group will be Dominic Thiem and Matteo Berrettini.

Andre Agassi Group consists of world number one Rafael Nadal, Daniil Medvedev, Stefanos Tsitsipas and reigning champion Alexander Zverev.

Nadal had been a doubt for the event after withdrawing ahead of the Paris Masters semi-final with an abdominal injury. 

The year-end number-one spot is up for grabs in London, with Nadal in the driving seat but Djokovic – the winner in Paris – ready to pounce.

Nadal has never won the ATP Finals, while Djokovic's last victory came in 2015 and Federer has endured an eight-year drought. 

Medvedev, Tsitsipas and Berrettini will each compete in the tournament for the first time, with the action scheduled to start on Sunday. 

Dominic Thiem rallied from a set down to beat Diego Schwartzman and claim a maiden Vienna Open title in his homeland on Sunday.

Schwartzman threatened to rip up the script at the Wiener Stadthalle, but top-seeded Austrian Thiem stormed back to win 3-6 6-4 6-3.

Thiem, who had failed to reach the final in his previous nine appearances in the tournament, recovered from a tentative start to stamp his authority on an entertaining match and claim an ATP Tour-leading fifth title of the season.

The world number five struggled with his serve in the first set and Schwartzman capitalised, but the favourite turned the tide to win a 16th title of his career with the backing of a partisan crowd.

Thiem failed to hold in the opening game of the match, but Argentinian Schwartzman was then broken to love in his first service game.

Schwartzman gained the initiative again by breaking for a 3-2 lead and took the set in emphatic fashion, with a break to love of his own.

Thiem took that in his stride and applied pressure early in the second set without immediate reward as the two continued to serve up high-quality rallies, trading punches from the baseline and mixing it up with deft drop shots.

The two-time French Open runner-up pumped his fist after fifth seed Schwartzman netted a forehand to go a break down at 5-4, and Thiem grasped the opportunity to serve out the set.

Thiem had the momentum and charged into a 2-0 lead in the decider, another errant Schwartzman forehand giving him the break in the opening game.

Schwartzman continued to put up a fight but could not force a break of his own and Thiem dropped to the deck in celebration after running in to put away a forehand winner and seal the title.

Dominic Thiem reached his third ATP Tour final in as many months with a battling victory over Matteo Berrettini at the Vienna Open.

Home hope Thiem, a recent winner at the Generali Open and China Open, avenged his Shanghai Masters loss to Berrettini by coming from behind to triumph 3-6 7-5 6-3 in two hours and 33 minutes.

Thiem, the top seed, will meet Diego Schwartzman in Sunday's final at the ATP 500 event, having made it to the showpiece match at this tournament for the first time in his 10th attempt.

After benefiting from Pablo Carreno Busta's retirement on Friday, the Austrian's task was not as straightforward in his semi-final against the third-seeded Italian, who had beaten him in the last eight in Shanghai a fortnight ago.

He dropped the first set after an energetic Berrettini broke three times.

But Berrettini's 28-match run of winning matches after claiming the first set came to an end amid a superb atmosphere.

After the pair exchanged breaks, Thiem made the decisive breakthrough to move 6-5 up in the second set before holding comfortably, levelling the match with a forehand up the line.

Thiem had won 10 of his previous 12 deciding sets this season and stretched that to a Tour-leading mark of 11 by breaking twice to race away with the third set, sealing victory with a backhand winner down the line on his second match point.

Despite Saturday's loss, Berrettini will reach the top 10 of the world rankings on Monday after his exploits this week and has boosted his hopes of joining Thiem in qualifying for the ATP Finals.

The second semi-final contained two players also hoping to reach London, as Schwartzman claimed a comfortable victory over Gael Monfils.

Argentine Schwartzman broke twice in each set to win 6-3 6-2 in 75 minutes, securing the win and a third final appearance of 2019 when Monfils fired a backhand long on his first match point.

Matteo Berrettini gave his hopes of qualifying for the ATP Finals a huge shot in the arm, while Dominic Thiem benefitted from Pablo Carreno Busta's withdrawal at the Vienna Open.

Italian Berrettini ended Andrey Rublev's seven-match winning streak with a hard-earned 7-5 7-6 (7-4) triumph in Austria to book a semi-final berth.

Berrettini, who will break into the world's top 10 on Monday, is eighth in the race for a place at the end-of-season tournament in London and is 130 points clear of Roberto Bautista Agut – a last-eight loser to Reilly Opelka in Basle.

Austrian home favourite Thiem, aiming to win this tournament for the first time, will be next up for Berrettini in the last four.

World number five Thiem was leading 5-0 against Carreno Busta when the Spaniard was forced to retire.

Diego Schwartzman still has an outside chance of reaching London himself and recovered from falling 3-0 behind in the first set to defeat Karen Khachanov 7-6 (8-6) 6-2.

The Argentinian plays Gael Monfils for a spot in the final after the Frenchman earned a convincing 7-5 6-1 triumph over Aljaz Bedene. 

Monfils moves into the top 10 in the race to London, as the battle for places in the English capital heats up.

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