ATP

Spring in Federer's step as he makes winning start to bid for 10th Swiss title

By Sports Desk October 21, 2019

Roger Federer was delighted to find a "good spring in my step" as he cruised into the second round of the Swiss Indoors Basel with a 21st successive victory at the event.

A nine-time winner in his home city, Federer overcame qualifier Peter Gojowczyk with ease in 53 minutes on court, making 34 winners in a 6-2 6-1 triumph.

It was the 1,500th match on the ATP Tour for Federer but he showed no signs of either fatigue or rustiness in a routine win.

"I thought the match was good," he said in quotes published on the ATP Tour's website.

"I felt like I had a good spring in my step and was quick onto the ball. Didn't take me long to get used to the conditions. That was positive.

“[I] knew of the danger playing Peter, especially indoors. He had a great couple of qualifying matches, so I knew he'd be tough, especially [because] he beat [Ivo] Karlovic easy, who serves great."

Elsewhere in Switzerland, eighth seed Benoit Paire was knocked out by wildcard Henri Laaksonen, who won 6-3 7-5, while Jan-Lennard Struff and Alex de Minaur advanced.

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