Kansas City Chiefs wide receiver Tyreek Hill predicts the reigning Super Bowl champions can win seven NFL titles in the coming years.

The Chiefs ended their 50-year wait for a second Super Bowl ring after defeating the San Francisco 49ers in last season's Super Bowl LIV.

Kansas City are now eyeing a Michael Jordan-like dynasty – the Chicago Bulls legend won six NBA championships in eight seasons – following Patrick Mahomes' mega 10-year contract extension reportedly worth $503million.

After Chris Jones claimed the Chiefs could win "five-plus" rings, Kansas City team-mate and four-time Pro Bowler Hill made a prediction of his own.

"Well, I'm not gonna say he's telling a fib," Hill told ESPN when asked about Jones' comments.

"But Chris Jones, he's definitely – he's definitely a man of his word, and we're definitely creating something special here in KC, so I don't see why not.

"Why say five? Why not go seven rings? Right now we're just chasing Jordan, so that's what we do. So I'm going over five, and I'm saying seven."

The Chiefs will begin their title defence against the Houston Texans on September 10.

Andy Reid's Kansas City will face the Cincinnati Bengals (August 15), Arizona Cardinals (August 22), Dallas Cowboys (August 29) and Green Bay Packers (September 3) in preseason.

After recently abolishing their long-time and often controversial name, Washington's NFL team will go without one for the upcoming 2020 season. 

The team announced on Thursday they will be called The Washington Football Team until a decision is made on a name to replace the Redskins moniker that was formally retired earlier this month amid heavy pressure from sponsors and activist groups. 

"For updated brand clarity and consistency purposes, we will call ourselves the "Washington Football Team" pending adoption of our new name," the team said in a statement. "We encourage fans, media and all other parties to use "Washington Football Team" immediately. The Redskins name and logo will officially be retired by the start of the 2020 season. 

The team added they will unveil new uniforms in time for their season opener against the Philadelphia Eagles on September 13.

Washington will keep their traditional burgundy and gold colour scheme, but will remove the Indian head logo on their helmets as well as any displays at their home stadium of FedExField. 

"Starting tomorrow and over the next 50 days, we will begin the process of retiring all Redskins branding from team properties whether it be FedExField, Redskins Park, other physical and digital spaces. We hope to complete this process in full by the team's home opener against the Philadelphia Eagles on September 13," the team stated. 

The franchise announced on July 13 they will relinquish the Redskins name used since 1933, their second season in the NFL. The decision was influenced by several major sponsors such as FedEx, Nike and PepsiCo requesting that majority owner Daniel Snyder change the name, widely viewed as being offensive to Native Americans. 

The change has been part of a tumultuous month for the franchise and Snyder, who recently hired a Washington-based law firm to review the organisation's culture after the Washington Post reported last week that 15 former female employees said they were sexually harassed during their time with the team.  

It should come as no surprise, but the NFL made it official on Wednesday that all fans attending games in the 2020 season will have to wear face coverings. 

It is still uncertain at this point if spectators will even be allowed to be at games as the United States has seen a recent surge in coronavirus cases amid the pandemic.

Public health officials have said that a simple way to curb the spread of COVID-19 is by wearing a mask that covers the mouth and nose when in close proximation with others. 

"For those wondering, yes, it is league-wide: fans at NFL games this season will be required to wear face coverings," NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said in a tweet attached with a photo of himself wearing a protective mask.

The state of New Jersey announced on Monday that the New York Giants and New York Jets will not be allowed to have fans in attendance for home games. Both teams play their home games at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey. 

A number of teams – including the Kansas City Chiefs, New England Patriots and Green Bay Packers – have already said they will have significantly reduced capacities this season, if spectators are allowed to attend at all. 

The NFL Players Association announced on Tuesday that 59 players leaguewide have tested positive for coronavirus at some point.

That is a decrease of 13 known positive tests from the union's last update, which came on Thursday when the NFLPA said 72 players were known to have tested positive as of July 10.

The NFLPA did not say how many players took the test, so the actual per cent of players to have tested positive is uncertain.

It was initially announced as 95 cases, but later revealed that number included staff.

Tuesday's results come a day after the NFL and NFLPA reached an agreement that coronavirus tests will be administered daily for at least the first two weeks of training camp as rookies begin to report.

After two weeks of daily testing, the timeliness of the tests will be switched to every other day if the positivity rate falls below five per cent among players and Tier I and Tier II individuals. The daily tests will continue past the two-week mark if the positivity rate does not drop.

Players who test positive must produce two negative tests separated by 72 hours before they have permission to enter their team's facility.

"Our union has been pushing for the strongest testing, tracing and treatment protocols to keep our players safe," the NFLPA said in a statement on Monday. 

"The testing protocols we agreed to are one critical factor that will help us return to work safely and gives us the best chance to play and finish the season."

The Los Angeles Rams announced on Tuesday in an email to their season ticket holders that their new SoFi Stadium will either be "at limited capacity or no capacity" for the upcoming season due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The team said that season tickets will not be possible in 2020 and will instead be deferred to the 2021 season. The Rams expect their stadium capacity to be limited to about 15,000 if fans are allowed at the multibillion-dollar SoFi Stadium at some point.

Additionally, the Rams said they anticipate that the NFL will cancel all preseason games, meaning the stadium's first scheduled game would be the Sunday night season opener against the Dallas Cowboys on September 13.

If fans are permitted to attend games, they would be required to wear a mask unless actively eating or drinking, and social-distancing guidelines will be enforced at all times throughout the venue.

The NFL Players Association announced on Tuesday that 95 players leaguewide have tested positive for coronavirus at some point.

That is an increase of 23 known positive tests from the union's last update, which came on Thursday when the NFLPA said 72 players were known to have tested positive as of July 10.

The NFLPA did not say how many players took the test, so the actual per cent of players to have tested positive is uncertain.

Tuesday's results come a day after the NFL and NFLPA reached an agreement that coronavirus tests will be administered daily for at least the first two weeks of training camp as rookies begin to report.

After two weeks of daily testing, the timeliness of the tests will be switched to every other day if the positivity rate falls below five per cent among players and Tier I and Tier II individuals. The daily tests will continue past the two-week mark if the positivity rate does not drop.

Players who test positive must produce two negative tests separated by 72 hours before they have permission to enter their team's facility.

"Our union has been pushing for the strongest testing, tracing and treatment protocols to keep our players safe," the NFLPA said in a statement on Monday. 

"The testing protocols we agreed to are one critical factor that will help us return to work safely and gives us the best chance to play and finish the season."

The NFL and NFL Players Association reached an agreement Monday over the issue of coronavirus testing, with tests to be administered daily for at least the first two weeks of training camp. 

The frequency of tests had been one of the biggest issues between the two sides, with the NFLPA pushing for daily tests as opposed to the league's position of every other day. 

After two weeks of daily testing, the timeliness of the tests will be switched to every other day if the positivity rate falls below five per cent among players and Tier I and Tier II individuals. The daily tests will continue past the two-week mark if the positivity rate does not drop. 

"There's no finish line with health and safety and I think these protocols are very much living and breathing documents, which means they will change as we gain new knowledge about this virus, as we gain new knowledge about transmission, as we gain new knowledge about testing and there are new tests and new techniques that come online," Dr. Allen Sills, the NFL chief medical officer, said during a conference call. "We very much anticipate that these protocols will change."

The decision to test every day came as rookies for the Kansas City Chiefs and Houston Texans were set to report to camp, and under the league's protocols, a player must produce one negative test before he is allowed to enter his team's facility. 

"These are complicated issues which involve a lot of factors," Sills said. "But suffice it to say we very much look at it from a medical and public health standpoint, and we want to make sure that first and foremost we're creating the safest possible environment for our players, for our coaches and our staff, but that we're also operating within the safest environment for each one of our clubs' locations, which means ongoing and regular communication with the public health authorities in those areas."

The agreement for daily testing also came one day after several NFL players took to social media to voice their concerns over a lack of a player safety plan for scheduled training camps. 

Prominent players such as Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson, New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, Texans defensive end J.J. Watt, Los Angeles Rams defensive tackle Aaron Donald and Cleveland Browns wide receiver Jarvis Landry all commented on social media on Sunday under the hashtag WeWantToPlay. 

"We know that we can't eliminate risk, but we're trying to mitigate it as much as possible for everyone," Sills said. "We know that this is going to be a shared responsibility." 

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy has decided not to grant an exception to a public safety executive order to the New York Giants and New York Jets, forcing both teams to play home games without fans in attendance. 

The pre-existing order limits large, outdoor public gatherings in an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus. 

The teams – which both call MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey home – issued a joint statement confirming the news on Monday. 

"We support Governor Murphy's decision in the interest of public health and safety," the statement said. 

"Although we would prefer to have fans at MetLife Stadium for our games, we will continue to work with Governor Murphy's office and will provide updates if necessary."

The teams also announced that their training camps will be closed to the public as a cautionary measure. 

"We urge our fans to continue to take the necessary precautions recommended by health officials to stay safe and we look forward to seeing you at MetLife Stadium as soon as possible," the statement said. 

The Giants' and Jets' situation stands in contrast to teams like the Baltimore Ravens and Jacksonville Jaguars who have announced plans to fill their stadiums to 20 or 25 per cent capacity with other safety protocols in place. 

MetLife Stadium opened in 2010 and has a seating capacity of 82,500. 

The New York-New Jersey area has been among the hardest hit by COVID-19 in the United States, with the Centers for Disease Control reporting nearly 220,000 confirmed cases in the New York City area. 

NFL players have utilised social media to voice their concerns over a lack of a player safety plan for scheduled training camps, using the hashtag WeWantToPlay.

In an email sent to all 32 teams on Saturday, the league said rookies will in most cases report on Tuesday, quarterbacks and injured players on Thursday and all other players on July 28.

Reigning Super Bowl champions the Kansas City Chiefs, along with the Houston Texans, have been granted permission to have rookies report on Monday because they kick off the season on September 10, three days before other teams are in action.

Even with camps set to open, discussions are ongoing between the NFL and NFL Players Association (NFLPA) regarding health and player safety protocols amid the coronavirus pandemic.

One of the biggest requests from the NFLPA is for players to be tested for COVID-19 daily, as opposed to every other day.

The NFLPA said on Thursday that 72 players were known to have tested positive, as of July 10.

That led to Sunday’s #WeWantToPlay social media blitz, with prominent players such as Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson, New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, Texans defensive end J.J. Watt, Los Angeles Rams defensive tackle Aaron Donald and Cleveland Browns wide receiver Jarvis Landry all commenting on social media.

NFLPA president JC Tretter also tweeted: "What you are seeing today is our guys standing up for each other and for the work their union leadership has done to keep everyone as safe as possible. The NFL needs to listen to our union and adopt the experts' recommendations #wewanttoplay."

The NFL told its 32 teams on Saturday that training camps can start on schedule in the coming week.

In an email, teams were notified that rookies will in most cases report on Tuesday, July 21, quarterbacks and injured players on July 23, followed by all other players on July 28.

Reigning Super Bowl champions the Kansas City Chiefs, along with the Houston Texans, have been granted permission to start camp earlier because they kick off the season on September 10, three days before other teams are in action.

Rookies for both those teams will report on Monday, NFL.com said.

Even with camps set to open, discussions are ongoing between the NFL and NFL Players Association (NFLPA) regarding health and player safety protocols amid the coronavirus pandemic.

One of the biggest requests from the NFLPA is daily player testing for COVID-19 as opposed to every other day. The NFLPA said on Thursday that 72 players were known to have tested positive, as of July 10.

Wide receiver A.J. Green signed his one-year franchise tender for $17.9 million with the Cincinnati Bengals on Friday, and will report to training camp. 

Tagged by the Bengals back in March, the seven-time Pro Bowler had been seeking a multi-year contract to stay in Cincinnati. The two sides did not work out a deal prior to Wednesday's deadline, however, and Green had said he would honour the tag and report to camp. 

"A.J. is one of the best receivers in the NFL," Bengals coach Zac Taylor said in a statement. "He's an important part of our plans, and we're thrilled to have him in the fold from day one. We're looking forward to the impact of his talent and leadership on our offense this season." 

After tearing his left ankle in the first practice of training camp a year ago and missing all of the 2019 season, the soon-to-be 32-year-old will be suiting up for a ninth season with the Bengals – and first without Andy Dalton. 

The fully healed Green will now be teaming up with number one pick Joe Burrow, so arriving at camp on time will be paramount for the two to develop chemistry after Green had worked for so long with a different quarterback. 

Since Green’s rookie season in 2011, only two quarterback-wide receiver tandems have totalled more pass completions than Dalton’s 581 to Green – the Pittsburgh Steelers' Ben Roethlisberger and Antonio Brown (783) and the Atlanta Falcons' Matt Ryan and Julio Jones (782) – and that is with Green missing all of last season. 

"By signing, A.J. puts himself and the team in the best position to have a great season together, and we look forward to the opportunity at the end of the season to discuss keeping him here long-term," Bengals executive vice president Katie Blackburn said.

"He has been an integral part of our team, and we expect this year that he will be the same impact player he has always been." 

Green has said before he would like to finish his career in Cincinnati, and only Chad Johnson ranks ahead of him in Bengals franchise history in receiving yards (8,907), receptions (602) and touchdown catches (63). 

As the NFL's deadline for teams and franchise-tagged players to agree to long-term contract extensions came to pass, the biggest deal was the deal that didn't happen.

So while the soap opera between Dak Prescott and the Dallas Cowboys gets to air another year after the two sides failed to work out a contract that would have put the talented quarterback among the NFL's highest-paid players, a few other teams were busy locking up vital players amid less fanfare.

Derrick Henry will still be pounding the rock for the Tennessee Titans for the foreseeable future, the Cleveland Browns made Myles Garrett the league's highest-paid defensive player and the Kansas City Chiefs will have defensive lineman Chris Jones on board for what should be an extended window for another Super Bowl run.

When breaking down those aforementioned agreements, it appears all three teams were able to get good value even in what's arguably been the most volatile offseason in league history.

Let's start with Henry. On the surface, the four-year, $50 million contract the Titans gave the 2019 NFL rushing champion looks rather risky considering the often short shelf life of running backs and how a similar pact the Los Angeles Rams constructed with Todd Gurley two summers ago spectacularly backfired.

But Tennessee wisely front-loaded the deal, with most of the $25.5 million in guarantees on the books for the first two seasons, and can cut bait without much penalty after 2021 in the event Henry begins to show a steep decline.

It's not hyperbole to suggest that Ryan Tannehill's breakthrough 2019 season was a direct result of the threat Henry presented to opposing defenses as a runner. By extending their most important player, the Titans have not only given their quarterback his best chance to succeed, they've increased their chances of again contending for an AFC title for at least the next two years.

Of course, the road to an AFC championship still figures to go through Kansas City following the reigning Super Bowl champions' massive recent spending spree that resulted in 2018 NFL MVP Patrick Mahomes landing a record 10-year extension worth up to $503 million and Jones agreeing to a four-year, $80 million deal.

The Chiefs will have some tough decisions to make to get under the salary cap once the big money in Mahomes' contract kicks in after this season, but they've rightfully identified Jones, whose 24.5 sacks over the last two seasons trails only Aaron Donald for the most among interior defensive linemen, as a player to keep.

And the 2019 Pro Bowler gets the benefits of some long-term security and the chance to reach free agency at the relatively young age of 30 - not to mention the opportunity to realistically add a few more rings to his collection.

Extending Garrett may not have been an urgent matter for the Browns, as the 2017 number one overall pick still had two seasons remaining on his rookie contract, but the five-year, $125 million extension was a shrewd, forward-thinking move by new general manager Andrew Berry.

Sure, $25 million a year for a non-quarterback is a lot of coin, but Cleveland has the most cap space in the league right now and with the way the pass-rusher market has been trending, that annual salary could be a relative bargain down the road if Garrett continues to produce double-digit sacks towards the latter end of the deal.

After years and years of bumbling leadership hires, the Browns just maybe have finally gotten it right this winter with the additions of two impressive young minds in Berry and new coach Kevin Stefanski.

It's still way too early to gauge the impact the coronavirus will ultimately have on the NFL's economic landscape in the coming years, but the Titans, Chiefs and Browns at least appear to have positioned themselves well for the potential pitfalls that may lie ahead.

Justin Simmons will play the 2020 season on the franchise tag and does not believe the Denver Broncos had any intention of signing him to a long-term deal.

Wednesday's deadline to sign franchise-tagged players to new contracts passed without Simmons and the Broncos coming to terms.

It means the 2019 second-team All-Pro will earn $11.4million on the franchise tender this coming season and could hit the open market in 2021.

"If the Broncos wanted to get a deal done, they would've," Simmons said on NFL Network's 'Good Morning Football'.

"And so the reality is another year on the franchise tag is like a contract year all over again. Year two in [head coach] Vic's [Fangio] system with all the weapons that we have, I'm more than confident in myself and what I can do.

"Moving forward, we'll just have to see. It's a business decision on both ends. Whatever's in my best interest and my family's best interest is always what I'm going to do."

The Broncos are seen by many as a team that could take a step forward in 2020, which will be quarterback Drew Lock's first full season as a starter.

However, Denver face a difficult challenge in an AFC West division that contains the Super Bowl-champion Kansas City Chiefs.

But Simmons is confident the Broncos have the personnel, particularly on defense, to contend.

"You're talking about Von Miller, Bradley Chubb is coming back, Jurrell Casey, we've got Shelby Harris, Alexander Johnson, Todd [Davis], myself, Kareem [Jackson], A.J. Bouye, Bryce [Callahan] is coming back," he added.

"We've just got so many weapons around the board. And we're talking about year two, guys feeling comfortable in the system. I can't say enough good things about our defense.

"You talk about a motivated defense at that. Guys willing to prove themselves. I'm excited. The season can't get here fast enough. We just need to get back to some football."

Washington owner Dan Snyder said he supports an "unbiased investigation" after 15 women who previously worked for the franchise alleged they were subjected to sexual harassment from team employees.

The women, only one of whom - Emily Applegate - was willing to go on record, made accusations against former scouts and members of Snyder's "inner circle" in an article by The Washington Post.

Attorney Beth Wilkinson confirmed her firm, Wilkinson Walsh, had been hired by the team to review the allegations.

In a statement, Snyder said: "The behaviour described in yesterday's [Thursday] Washington Post has no place in our franchise or society.

"This story has strengthened my commitment to setting a new culture and standard for our team, a process that began with the hiring of Coach [Ron] Rivera earlier this year.

"Beth Wilkinson and her firm are empowered to do a full, unbiased investigation and make any and all requisite recommendations.

"Upon completion of her work, we will institute new policies and procedures and strengthen our human resources infrastructure to not only avoid these issues in the future but most importantly create a team culture that is respectful and inclusive of all." 

The NFL earlier released a statement, which read: "These matters as reported are serious, disturbing and contrary to the NFL's values.

"Everyone in the NFL has the right to work in an environment free from any and all forms of harassment."

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